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Si4JV FRANCISCO, JULY I, 1899. 



Number 26. 



Printed and published retry Saturday by the proprietor. FRKl) MARRIOTT 
ftH Kearny street. San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Pott, 
ojlet at Stcond-clatt Matter. 

Tht o/tct of the XKWS LETTER in Xtv Tort OUy it at Ttmplt Court, 
[Geo. A. Kellogg, Eatttrn Representative), where information may bt 
obtained regarding eubtcriplion and advertising ratet. 

All tocial itemt, announcement*, advertising, or other matter, intended for 
publication in the current number of the tJBWB LETTER, thould be 
tent to this office not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 



T 



H I NGS are getting quiet in Nebraska. A week has 
passed with only one cyclone. 

FIXGREE of Michigan has declared for Alger, which 
ought to be suffic ient to damn the pair. 

ZOLA is probably the biggest man in Paris, but con- 
cerning the fact he is also tooting the loudest horn. 

THE automobile seems to be a success, notwithstand- 
ing that there are no reports yet that it has killed 
anybody. 

FOR the present, at least, purity in politics must be 
regarded as a dream. Here's the editor of the Exam- 
iner mixing up in it. 

REV. J. B. A. WILSON 
explains that " The Man 
With the Hoe" had the im- 
plement placed in his hands 
by drink. The view is nar- 
row and fallacious. The man, 
needing the drink, would 
pawn the hoe to get it. The 
Wilson theory argues that 
the hoe is not a necessity, 
and the holding of it a dis- 
grace. In fact, he is as nec- 
essary as a preacher, his 
calling as honorable, and his 
place in the world as hard to 
fill. The Man with the Hoe 
is as he is because God chose 
to make him that way. De- 
signed to play the fiddle or 
teach Delsarte, he would 
have been molded on differ- 
ent lines. 

THE statement of two 
Br.issels physicians that 
they have perfected a serum 
for the cure of cancer will 
be received with both inter- 
est and incredulity. There 
will be a hope and a doubt. 
The fact cannot be forgotten 

that similar statements have been made concerning other 
diseases, that had they all been verified, the human race 
would be obliged to commit suicide or undergo the incon- 
venience of living forever. 



WHILE there is evidence that more soldiers are needed 
in the Philippines, there is a growing feeling that a 
General to direct them would be part of a good plan. 

SN Indiana man, who claims to know how to manufac- 
ture gold, naturally refuses to reveal the secret. Nat- 
urally, also, he couldn't if he wanted to. 

THERE is no necessity for wasting any sentiment on 
France. That country requires trouble to make it 
happy and a crisis to render it serene. 

DISPATCHES announce that Uncle Sam will rule Cuba 
"for some years." The necessity for somebody to 
rule the island is beginning to be recognized. 



Testing the Gravity of Oil. 



RACE-GOERS will be surprised at the formation of a 
trust among bookmakers. An impression had pre- 
vailed that these gentlemen already had facilities for get- 
ting all the money in sight. 

ENGLAND objects to the purchases of arms by the 
Boers. Nevertheless, England has not been ob- 
served in the act of asking Oom Paul's permission to pur- 
chase whatever she may need. 



MINISTERS have begun to attack the fad known as 
Christian Science. As this anomaly is devoid of a rec- 
ognizable tincture of Christianity, and utterly destitute of 
a trace of science, they might well put in their time fight- 
ing something worth while. 

FOR using vile language 
to women, a fellow named 
Goldberg recently had his 
head nearly knocked off. The 
strangest part of the pro- 
ceeding was his nerve in car- 
rying the matter into court 
for sympathy. The next 
time he gets licked he will at 
least be judicious enough 
to say nothing about it. 

THERE can hardly be a 
doubt but Alger has such 
a grip on the Administra- 
tion that he cannot be shaken 
off. The head of the War 
Department is simply Mc- 
Kinley's Old Man of the Sea. 

INERS indicted in Idaho 
_must stand trial, a cir- 
cumstance causing their law- 
yers and their journalistic 
backers much grief. No ex- 
planation is made of the pe- 
culiar theory, that a miner , 
has any more right than 
another person to kill his 
neighbors and destroy their 
property. The possibility of 
future inconvenience should 
have been thought of in advance. 

SUCH a creature as Emma Goldman should be ridden 
out of town on a rail, courtesy, of course, suggesting 
that the rail be equipped with a side-saddle. 

DE CLAM has been trying to get away from his name 
and reputation by suicide, and failed. Evidently the 
usual facilities have been denied him. Are French methods 
of imprisonment grown more austere ? 

PROBABLY the man who robbed the Alameda is not 
worried particularly about the numerous clues as to his 
identity, since all of them seem to lead to spots from which 
his person has the discretion to remain absent. 




m 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 



FACTS ABOUT CRUDE OIL. 

UPWARDS of 30 years ago when the splendid oil of 
West Virginia gave signs that its supply was becom- 
ing exhausted, experienced oil prospectors found in 
Pennsylvania, in districts quite remote from already pro- 
ductive territory, much oil of excellent quality both for 
illuminating and lubricatiog purposes. 

The Standard Oil Company, then in its infancy, raised 
the bowl that the oil was "a dangerous explosive" and 
quite "uDfit for commercial use." But when the 
Pennsylvania oil fields in their turn showed signs of ex- 
haustion, the astute Rockefellers secured all the oil leases 
they could get hold of, and the cry of "dangerous explo- 
sives" was heard no more. 

When Ohio and Indiana came in as oil producers, the 
cry was changed to "too low fire test" and that these oils 
were unhealthy as they contained such a "large amount 
of sulphur." But all the same, millions of gallons of this 
death-dealing fluid (?) are yearly sold by the Standard 
people as Pennsylvania oil. Of course it is quite unneces- 
sary to say that the Standard under various aliases own 
nineteen-twentieths of the Ohio and Indiana fields now. 

Some such depreciating cry is sure to be heard about 
the oils of this State, especially as the majority of them 
are rich in naphthas; some stand a very low cold test and 
others a high fire test, which renders them equally as 
valuable at any rate, as the best Ohio oils; while the 
specific gravity is, on the average, quite normal. Their 
richness in naphthas then, their low cold test and high 
fire test, apart altogether from any consideration of their 
value when refined, as illuminants, at the present price of 
crude in the East ought to gratify producers. Since the 
first discovery of petroleum, the greasy fluid has been 
found to be of great value for many purposes beside that 
of illumination. 

Crude oil for instance, is rapidly taking the place of 
coal for fuel, even where that mineral can be bought as 
low as $2 00 per ton delivered, for, it is quite smokeless 
and cinderless; in combustion, the temperature can be 
kept at one unvarying point, (a perfect impossibility with 
coal, however clever the fireman may be), a great de- 
sideratum in malleable iron works, and similar manufac- 
tures. Oil saves about two-thirds in the cost of labor 
alone. Its heat co-efficient, is found to be this: Forty- 
two gallons of crude oil are equivalent to one ton of the 
best bituminous coal. Oil, when burnt as fuel, deposits, 
in lieu of smokes (which in the case of coal ruins apparel 
of all kinds, books, pictures, and other valuables) a delicate 
substance called lamp-black of much commercial value. 
From crude oil is taken naphtha, which at a gravity of 
64 deg. Beaume test, when added to water-gas, makes a 
fine illuminating agent. The gas supplied by the Chicago 
Gas Co. (a side show of the Standard) is all made this way. 
The oil is piped from just across the State line in Indiana, 
and the naphtha is shipped in tanks holding several hund- 
red barrels. Crude oil from Frpsno can easily be piped to 
this city and so put San Francisco in a position to compete 
successfully, notwithstanding the smallness of her 
developed and settled territory, with the very largest of 
Eastern manufacturers. The great Trunk lines west of 
the Missouri River use hundreds of thousands of gallons of 
car axle oil every year. In winter, this oil must flow 
freely at zero, and in summer stand at least 500 deg. 
F. FIRE test. Fresno oil will meet these requirements 
and so be able to comply with the specifications of the 
C. B. & O, the C. R. S. & P., the U. P., the N. P., the 
C. M. & S. P., and all roads using the standard specifica- 
tions for car axle oils. One sample of Fresno oil saponifies 
well, and would be valuable as a cylinder lubricant on 
steamships sailing in salt water, and for use in meat 
canneries. As these lines catch the readers eye, the 
magnificent mail steamships of the "Austrian Lloyds" 
sailing from Trieste, Genoa and other poiuts to Brindisi 
and Alexandria, are plowiDg the blue seas, and emitting 
no smoke, dust or cinders from their smoke stacks. 
Engineers and fire-men are alike dressed all in spotless 
white and the floors of the engine and boiler rooms are 
whiter than this page. Four great English railways are 
now using oil instead of coal and the comfort to crowded 
London is much appreciated. Oil for fuel can be carried 
in water-ballast tanks on merchant steamships, or war 



vessels, with perfect safety, and effect a great saving of 
expense in the maintenance of coaling stations far from 
home. From the residuum of crude oil, when refined, the 
city and village belles are supplied with the emollient 
vaseline, the lovely aniline dyes, the delicate flavor of the 
Bartlett pear in their lollvpops, and, chiefest of all, the 
seductive chewing-gum. Gasoliae, benzine, paraffine wax 
candles, antipyrine, antifebrin, antikamnia, sulphinal and 
all the other sedatives and anodynes of what is called "the 
coal-tar series," owe their origin to petroleum. It is death 
to bed bugs and many insects that destroy trees and plants. 
This fortunate oil-strike so near us, should, if properly 
managed, inure as much to the benefit of this City and 
State, as a fresh gold discovery. 

Author-Critics The literary editor of one of our ambiti- 
And ous dailies recently accorded superlative 

Sailor-Critics, and unqualified praise to the novel, 
"Moran of the Lady Letty," and its 
author, Frank Norris. Later, the same journal printed 
an article, written by J. F. Rose-Soley, criticising the 
book in question so aptly and cleverly that the literary 
editor who had lauded Norris most effusively saw fit to 
caption it, "What Frank Norris Does Not Know About 
Navigation." Verily, Rose Soley demonstrated that 
Norris has a few things to learn about the sea. 

Where is the author who would not break a lance in de- 
fense of his own literary creation? About two columns of 
space in the last Sunday edition of the ambitious daily 
were consumed by Norris in an effort to show up (as the 
literary editor puts it) "What Mr. Rose-Soley Does Not 
Know About Literature." 

The case stands thus: Mr. Norris writes a book about 
the sea. The literary editor goes into ecstacy about it in 
a boomful page, declaring substantially that the book is 
all right. A fortnight brings a change, and he sanctions 
Rose-Soley's conclusions that the hook is all wrong. It is 
merely a temporary change, for, seven days later, the 
editor squares himself with Mr. Norris by emphasizing the 
latter's charge of literary incompetence against Rose- 
Soley. 

Mr. Norris demands that Rose-Soley "be one thing or 
another — a sailor or a critic." It is hard to believe that 
such babyish nonsense could emanate from the writer of a 
popular novel. 

" A man mast serve his time to every trade 
Save critics— critics all are ready-made." 

A sailor-critic, of all critics, should be most competent 
to expose the nautical absurdities of a landsman's sea- 
story. The judgment of the average layman in the liter- 
ary world will certainly be that literary criticism, as ex- 
emplified by the ambitious daily, must not be taken 
seriously; that Mr. Norris can learn something concerning 
the sea from Mr. Rose-Soley, and that Mr. Rose-Soley is 
quite equal to the task of taking care of himself in a 
literary controversy with the author of "Moran of the 
Lady Letty." 

Something As To Citizens of San Francisco who know 
One J. M. Chretien. J. M. Chretien are not surprised 
that he has been kicked out of the 
Fourth of July Committee in disgrace. The wonder is how 
this creature evergotinto the Committee or was placed in 
a position where he could handle money or swindle other 
people. Mr. Chretien's reputation in San Francisco is 
well-known. He has been detected more than once in 
tricks which have sent his betters to the penitentiary. 
Chretien is the fellow who, temporarily disguised as a gen- 
tleman, gained admission to the Bohemian Club. There 
he smuggled in a professional gambler, with whom he had 
previously arranged to stock the cards and rob a wealthy 
member, and then divide the spoils. In all gentlemen's 
clubs the fascinating game immortalized by Schenck is 
played, and, as the members are gentlemen, an honest 
game is the result, and the hazards and fortunes of the 
play are borne with a fortitude born of a knowledge that 
the forfeits are honestly lost and as honestly won. 

Chretien and the other blackleg worked their game suc- 
cessfully, and the gentleman marked by them as the most 
worthy object of their thriving attention lost heavily. He 
finally became acquainted with the facts, and Chretien 



Joly t. 1899. 



PAX FRAXCTSCO XT-WS T.F.TTHR 



til kicked out of the Club. The money won he refused to 
divide with his pal, thus exploding the time-honored saw 
that there is honor among tnit- 

Aoother instance showing the moral depravity and 
native bent for crookedness thai reside in the heart 
o( Mr. J. M. Chretien : A mirried gentleman, de- 
siring to raise money on personal property, went with 
Chretien before a notary, who drew up the necessary pa- 
pers. In the presence of the officer the man signed the 
papers, but his wife's signature had been attached before. 
Chretien assured the notary that he personally knew that 
the lady's name had been affixed by herself, and upon his 
affirmation the officer attached his official seal and name 
to them. It ultimately transpired that the woman's name 
was a forgery. 

As to contributions to the celebration funds: Chretien 
constituted himself a committee to collect money from 
citizens for the Fourth, evidently, as subsequently de- 
veloped, intending to put the money in his own pocket. A 
saloon keeper, from whom he obtained $10, when ap- 
proached by the properly authorized persons, explained 
that he had already contributed through Chretien. Taxed 
with the peculation, Chretien declared that he simply bor- 
rowed the money for bis own use. 

Here, in brief, is a record of the personal history of Mr. 
Chretien, which can be substantiated before any jury or 
Judge in California. Is there any wonder to be expressed 
at the developments made in the Fourth of July Commit- 
tee? Are there so few honest men in San Francisco that 
blacklegs must be chosen to purse the people's contribu- 
tions? 

The community owe thanks to Mr. A. S. Baldwin for 
the distinct service he has rendered in exposing this dis- 
reputable business. 

Tho Twisting and Some curious things are happening 
Entangling of Law. over the labor troubles in the North- 
west. The laborers have been try- 
ing to secure higher wages by acts of intimidation that are 
altogether without justification. This is a free country, 
and the wage earner has a right to refuse to sell his labor 
for less than he believes it to be worth. In exercising such 
refusal, no man, be he President or common constable, has 
the right to say him nay. The boasted freedom of this 
country would be a sham were it otherwise. On the other 
Land, as the worker is entitled to this freedom of action, 
so also is the so-called "scab." The one may stand out 
for what he thinks he ought to get, whilst the other, from 
sheer want or other cause, may be willing to work for 
what he can get. The freedom of action is the same for 
both. In the endeavor to advance wages, the workers have 
the same right of combination, at least, that is now so 
freely being exercised by the many trusts of the period. 
We say "at least," because there is some doubt whether 
the interference of the trusts with the freedom of trade is 
awful. If we interfere with the trusts on this ground, it 
would seem that we have an equal right to interfere with 
the trades unions. They are equally combinations in re- 
straint of trade, or, if there be any difference, it is against 
the unions. But the Constitution does not discriminate in 
favor of any one class, but declares "that all men are born 
free and equal." If any one class be the victim of assault 
and intimidation for doing what it has a right to do, the 
law is set at naught, and the intimidators ought to be re- 
strained and punished. These are the elementary rules 
that should govern such matters. But during strikes they 
are usually forgotten by all parties mixed up in them. The 
military and judicial officers of the Government are about 
the first to lose their heads. They did so the other day 
at Wallace, Idaho. The Judge refused the prisoners a 
writ of habeas corpus, denied them the right of an inter- 
view with their witnesses, and refused to draw a jury from 
the body of the county, but appointed a partisan known 
to be inimical to the accused. That Judge did more vio- 
lence to the law than the men did to the peace, and should 
be held responsible accordingly. 

A Stranger to In a recent issue of the Examiner was a 
the Truth. statement that George Crocker, of the 
Southern Pacific had, because of the acci- 
dental delay of his cook in preparing dinner, held a train 



for an hour and a quarter. The delay was of course an- 
noying, and the editorial ear having been tickled by an ac- 
count of it, the editorial chin protruded menacinglv, and 
the inner parts (we had almost said intellectual parts) of 
the editor were stirred to wrath. Rising on bis hind legs 
be pawed the air, vowing that the railroad magnate should 
receive a lesson. So with many a flourish, accompanied 
by the picture of the capitalist, that the public might 
realize fully who was being rebuked, the tale was printed. 
The only fault with it, aside from the manifest spirit of 
malice, was in the circumstance that it was utterly 
untrue. On the contrary, Mr. Crocker had given pa- 
trons of the road the benefit of a special train ordered 
for bis own use. He had done so for the reason that 
the regular train, upon which they had expected to be car- 
ried from Castle Crag to this city, was hours behind. 
Rather than have them subject to the annoyance of wait- 
ing, Mr. Crocker ordered more cars put upon his private 
train, thus saving them a long wait which, excepting for 
his generous thoughtfulness, they must have undergone. 
For this, the passengers who understood, were naturally 
grateful; but the editor did not want to understand. He 
accepted the conclusion that any act of any Southern Pa- 
cific official must be wrong. Once he would not have done 
this. When the paper he directs in the paths of purity 
was on the payroll of the corporation, he would have com- 
mended Mr. Crocker, but since that happy time, it's dif- 
ferent. No corporation is free from faults. We are not 
fighting the battles of any of tbem, but merely for the 
truth, to which the Examiner is a stranger, and to 
which it declines an introduction. If Mr. Crocker objects 
to being abused by the paper mentioned, experience has 
doubtless taught him the method of avoiding it. However, 
it has taught him also that immunity is not worth the price 
asked. Wisdom suggests that the editorial yowl be per- 
mitted to spend itself, noisy, undisturbed and impotent. 



To Be Classed No thoughtful person will deny that 
With Fakes. among "Christian Scientists" are to be 
found many conscientious people. Ap- 
plying the faculty of thought further, it is discerned that 
these people are deluded by the shrewdness of charlatans, 
or that in some degree their minds have gone away. For 
the whole theory is baseless, its sounding phrases nonsensi- 
cal and its practice suicidal. When a man states that by this 
so-called science his bones have been knit, his strangulated 
hernia united, or his eyesighi restored, he merely states 
that which is not true, which folks with brains unaddled 
know to be not true, and which, in the light of reason, 
is ridiculous. If a woman smash her thumb with a ham- 
mer, a suitable poultice is all she needs, and neither Chris- 
tianity nor fancied science cut any figure in the healing. 
Yet all the delusions are readily explained. Many imagine 
themselves ill when in truth they are simply lazy, and in- 
stead of mourning over ails that never existed, ought to 
be attending to household duties or plowing corn. No 
doctor can help them, principally because they do not need 
help, and the Christian Science fad catches thorn. It 
teaches them to imagine themselves well. Others rush 
for medical assistance when all they require is rest, fall 
into the hands of miserable quacks, such as advertise^ in 
the highly moral dailies of this city, and soon lay up a 
store of disgust which comprehends the while medical fra- 
ternity. While convalescing, which they are certain to d)o 
if they leave the quacks soon enough, they learn of Chris- 
tian Science, and pondering it, get well through the pro- 
cesses of nature. But they are converts. The most silly 
contention set up by exponents of this folly, and all are in 
a measure silly, is that as Christ used no medicines, the 
human race should not. This view eliminates considera- 
tion of the divine attributes to which history and legend 
have ascribed a miraculous power of healing. Attention 
is here properly called to the belief that Christ turned 
water into wine, blasted a fig-tree, created of nothing an 
abundance of loaves and fishes. If they have power to 
follow this example in a few instances, mundane intelli- 
gence will accept the belief that they can follow it in the 
particular of healing. Until they shall make the demon- 
stration, however, their boasts will be regarded as- idle 
chatter, and their patients as victims of a sweet and abid- 
ing homicidal mania. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 



A Companion Th»t The New York Tribune, which is the 
Hurts tho principal organ of President McKin- 

War Department. ley, has evidently made up its mind 
that the sooner Secretary Alger is 
out of office the better it will be for the Administration. 
Mismanagement and incompetency have been accounted 
for by departmental officers, and especially by Surgeon- 
General Sternberg, to a lack of a sufficient clerical force. 
The Tribune goes to much trouble to explode this allega- 
tion. It shows, in tables of figures, that in 1863, when the 
Civil War was at its height and the Government had a 
million men under arms, it had a clerical force in the War 
Department of 665, and of these 133 were in the Provost 
Marshall's department, which does not exist now. By 
May 31, 1897, three months after Secretary Alger bad 
taken office, this number had been increased to 1366. 
Thus the employees of the Department numbered twice as 
many when the entire military force consisted of 30,000 
men and when peace prevailed, as when the Government 
was conducting a great war with a million men in the 
field. Judged by the number of men in arms, 665 em- 
ployees were doing 33 times as much work in 1863 as 663 
employees were doing in 1897. Since the war with Spain 
broke out, over 1,000 " temporarily " engaged clericals 
have been given places. The figures are of interest in 
connection with the claim that the War Department failed 
to rise to the war emergency because of an insufficient 
clerical force. The fact would seem to be to the contrary 
of this. When the rolls are examined it is found that a 
very large proportion of the "temporaries" are from 
Michigan. It is clear that, in the interests of the Admin- 
istration, Whitelaw Reid would rather have Alger in the 
Senate than in the Cabinet. 

After the In San Francisco there dwelleth many tax 
Tax Dodgera. dodgers. For one class of them there is 
much excuse. Personal property dodges 
the Assessor almost as its owner wishes. On the other 
hand, the owners of small homes can rarely escape, and 
have to make good the amount which personal property 
so easily evades. For the latter there is sympathy; for 
the former there can be none. The right method of show- 
ing sympathy in the case is to find a way to make the tax 
dodger pay up, thus lessening the burden of the house- 
holder, who only dodges when he can, which is not often. 
The State of Illinois has hit upon a plan that is working 
wonders for the present, and principally because of the 
publicity that is given to tax shirking. From this it would 
seem that they have better consciences, in even wicked 
Chicago, than are to be found in some other places we 
know. The new law requires that each property-holder, 
real as well as personal, must come before the County As- 
sessors and submit a sworn schedule of all he possesses. 
In case of a refusal to come, 50 per cent of a fairly esti- 
mated value of his property is added to it for the purpose 
of taxation. Then the law requires that all personal as- 
sessments be given ihe widest possible publicity. The 
reports from most of the counties show wonderful addi- 
tions to the assessment rolls. In Chicago, only a few thous- 
and persons have failed to submit sworn statements, and 
the assessed valuation has increased 75 per cent, most of 
it from personal property. It is said that hidden values 
are coming to light in a wonderful way, and the law is de- 
clared to be "almost proof against fraud and evasion.'' 
That may be, but with a deadened public conscience as 
good results would not be obtained. A false oath as to 
values that are hidden is not a sin with all people every- 
where. 

Bubonic Plague There is no port in the United States 
and Quarantine, that needs a stricter quarantine than 
that of San Francisco. We are now in 
such frequent and quick communication with the terrible 
disease-breeding grounds of the East that nothing but 
eternal vigilance will keep out its death-dealing plagues. 
The cholera, small-pox,;typhoid andintermittentfevers, and 
now the dreaded bubonic plague, are liable to be in upon 
us without a moment's warning or a particle of prepara- 
tion. Quarantine of a most rigid character is the only 
known means of keeping such diseases out. But it is to 
be feared that our quarantine is not of that kind. The ac- 



commodation for receiving passengers, immigrants, troops, 
etc., at Angel Island needs enlarging and making more 
comfortable, and the arrangements for the delivery of 
food, clothing, etc., should be very much more strict than 
they are. The ships should be better aired and fumigated 
than they are, and passengers of all grades should be de- 
tained for as long a period as experience determines to be 
wise and necessary. To let the cabin passengers ashore 
at the end of two days is a species of favoritism that will 
cost this city dearly some day. A ship infected with small- 
pox, for instance, should be kept in quarantine for 18 to 
21 days from the breaking out of the last known case. A 
lesser period does not afford adequate protection, as the 
books of authority all show. We are escaping better than 
could be expected since the war with the Philippines, but 
perhaps this is because the ships are chartered for time 
periods, and their owners are not interested adversely to 
quarantine delays. The doctors, therefore, report every 
suspicious case, and due precautions are taken. But that 
will hardly be the case when government supervision is at 
an end. Our quarantine system is cracked up to be bet- 
ter than it is. It will stand a great deal of perfecting yet. 
The bubonic plague has already reached Honolulu. It may 
be in San Francisco any day, which is without a hospital 
in which to treat it. 



Gay Piumaged Birds Some years ago the News Letter 
For The Park. suggested bow easily the Golden 
Gate Park might be stocked with 
such gay piumaged birds as are to be found principally in 
Australia. The time was not propitious, however. The 
commissioners of that time admitted that the idea was 
perfectly practicable, and that its execution would add 
very greatly to the attractiveness of the Park, but its in- 
come was then so limited, and its expenses so great that 
the commissioners felt deterred from entering upon any 
new enterprise. But things have greatly changed since 
then. The Park's revenue has been greatly increased, and 
its permanent improvements have been pushed on well to- 
wards completion. The time has fully come when an 
appropriation can be made to add a feature to the Parle 
of surpassing interest. We have a climate here very 
similar to that of Australia and any bird that lives there, 
or any plant that grows, could be perfectly acclimatized 
in California. In regard to plant life the Golden Gate 
Park is indebted for nearly all that it possesses to the 
Antipodes. Had we been compelled to depend upon the 
East, we should have had a leafless park in the winter. 
The bright yellow blossoms of the different varieties of 
acacia, and stately evergreen of the eucalyptus, make a 
difference that is incalculable. With every tree and bush 
the native habitat of the hundreds of different hued birds 
to be found in Australia, the Park would be instinct with 
life and beauty. They could soon be turned loose to care 
for themselves, and would increase and multiply exceed- 
ingly. They would not leave the Park as there is no 
similar shelter near by, and, if a few did go farther afield, 
what would it matter? They ought to be acclimatized all 
over California. The experiment could be made successful 
for a few hundred dollars. 



While the folks are away in the country and the house is empty 
will be an excellent time to have the carpets taken np and sent to 
Spaulding's Steam Cleaning Works, where the latest and newest 
machinery will make them look like new. They will be relaid and 
sewed— everything spick and span for the folks when they get back 
from the country. Remember the place, 353 Tehama street. 



The Peace Commission at The Hagne may result in nothing of the 
least importance, but that has nothing to do with the fact that J. F. 
Cutter and Argonaut whiskeys are the finest liquors to be found in 
the world. They are time tested and full of vigor and life. Nothing 
better ever passed the lips of man. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market 
street, sole agents for the United States. 



The popular Grand Hotel Cafe is just receiving the finishing 
touches of the painters and paper bangers. The best business mans* 
luncheon to be found in the city is served there by Foster & Fay 
every day from 11:30 until 2 o'clock. 

Stirks orchestra— which is soon to go Bast, still delights the 
thousands of patrons who visit Cafe Zinkand nightly for supper or a 
fine glass to drink after the theatre. 



July t, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




THERE is a matron of Society who is a great favorite 
with her friends. She takes special care to be nice 
to the elderly girls and pay old bachelors, and is never 
happier than when planning a match for each. Several 
that she undertook failed ignominiously, however, and not 
long since she gave a ladies' luncheon, and told the women 
there assembled that there was one thing she wanted set 
right, and that was the way the club was blamed for 
keeping men from social visiting, etc. No such thing, she 
declared, was the fact, but, on the contrary, the system 
some of our bachelors have adopted of having suites of 
rooms down town, where they have (presumably) stag 
parties, proves more tantfncon and enticing than formal 
drawing-room evenings. Those Market street suites and 
Kearny street dittos are the real secret why the men 
have grown so selfish. 

# • * 

The departure of General S. B. M. Young for Manila 
revives interest in the tate of his pretty daughter, whom 
it will be remembered was quite popular in society. While 
living, she managed to create within her breast an affec- 
tion for an impecunious actor named Mr. Charles Charters. 
Mr. Charley Charters had hard work to support himself; 
those of his friends could not imagine how it came easier 
to support two than one. Mrs. Charters, it will be borne 
in mind, also joined the stage, and won distinction for her 
beautiful frocks. The last beard of the ambitious pair was 
when they were in Seattle. People are wondering whether 
the thoughts of the hero of El Caney wandered affection- 
ately toward the pretty girl, or did the superior charms 
of the widow with the big income efface from memory all 
other reminiscences ? 

» • » 

Who shall now say that sisters have not a definite use. 
The handsome young doctor who recently married discov- 
ered last week that had it not been for the assiduous work 
of his fair sisters, who to him were angels in disguise, 
never, oh never, would he have been in the employ of the 

Board of Health. 

# # # 

It is claimed by the enemies of the Yellow Journal that 
it has been and is responsible for much mischief as a result 
of its reckless assertions in public print, whether founded 
on fact or no. Everything "goes." Some big headlines 
in that paper one morning last week might have led to a 
coolness between friends, to say nothing more; for 'tis 
said that friends of young Jim Flood and his newly wedded 
wife telegraphed them to Paris, asking what was the row 
over there that they were reported to have created, vide 
a cable in the daily Examiner — " The Floods' Fall on 

Paris." 

• * * 

There is a rumor in the swim that a young Eastern man 
of wea'th who visited Del Monte recently in the party of a 
multi-millionaire, was captivated by a local belle sojourn- 
ing at the hotel. No wonder maids and mamas look with 
favorable eye on this queen of watering places, for the 
number of eligible partis who visit there as a sure thing 
when doing the Coast cannot be found at any other of our 
numerous resorts, unless it may be Castle Crag. 

# » * 

A startling whisper is running through the swim that a 
certain young beau — with more money than prudence — is 
bent upon giving his friends a surprise for his portion of 
the celebration on the National holiday, and for that pur- 
pose has enlisted the aid of a set of young folks. The af- 
fair is being kept so close only the mere outline is obtaina- 
ble as yet, but we can promise our readers they will have 
full particulars when the event comes off. 

# * » 

'Tis well to be off with the old love before you are on 
with the new, is a saying as old as the hills, and yet we 
see it disregarded every day. The lovely Alice knows 
how this is, no doubt. 



On dit the sweetness of manner exhibited by the wife of 
a Government official in one of our recently acquired pos- 
sessions inclines one to believe that political methods are 
not confined to her brothers, for there is yet a Governor 
to be placed in position over there, and a woman's influ- 
ence is frequently most potent in securing votes for an 
election. 

• • » 

The flirtatious old widow who goes to the Lakes region 
for her summer outing will be in evidence again this 
season, as she is already on the ground looking round for 
her summer campaign. 

* « » 

On dit the sweet-faced daughter of the lawyer's widow 
is earnestly desired as a daughter-in-law by the quondam 
San Jose-ite. 

For 35 years Jackson's Napa Soda baa led all mineral waters. 



i iMUt ■? tit littt tititititif 



***# 



■MnUil 

I College San Rafael 

For Young Ladies. * 

Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic. 4 

' ' Pull oolleglo course of studies. A boarding sohool of highest 3 

** grade. Superb modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful 5 

and commodious olass rooms. Music and art rooms. 3 

Looated In the lovely Magnolia Valley. 3 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Address, J 

MOTHER SUPERIOR, \ 

f College San Rafael. San Rafael, Oal . 



Irving Institute 



Select Boarding and Day 
School for young ladles 



2126 CALIFORNIA ST., S- F. 

Next session will begin August 7th. Accredited to the Universities. 
Seminary and Full Conservatory of Music Primary Department for chil- 
dren. Carriage will call. For further information, address the Prlnoipal, 

REV. EDWARD B. CHURCH, A. M. 



T* • *A. e* 1 1 [Founded 1876.] 

I rinitV «!?CnOOl, 3300 Washington St. 
•^ ban Francisco. 

Boarding and Day School for Young Men and Boys 

Prepares for University and College; accredited with the Univer- 
sity of California and Leland Stanford University. A Faculty of 
eleven Professors and Teachers. Boarders limited to thirty -fire. 
Christmas Term opens August 1st 

Rev. Dit. E. B. Spalding, Hector. 



H. J. STEWART, Musical Director 

Has removed his Music Studio to 

1406 Van Ness Avenue, 
Between Bush and Fine. 

The Solly Walter School of Illustration 

Will re-open August 1st for the fall and winter term. 

26 O'Farrell St- 

PROF. WALTER WATSON, §£!«■ 2„7thy s?cYl a u!tt™! 

LeBsons private, in class, or at your residence. 

417 ELLIS STREET, S F., CAL. 

San Francisco Dress-Cutting School, 

French tailor method taught. Full course of instruction in the 
art of Dressmaking. Patterns out to oraer. Terms reasonable. 
Men and, women teachers employed. 

202 Q ROVE ST- 8. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 




•* We obey no wana but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

SORRY I cannot keep my promise about " the other 
people" in the cast of The Adventures of The Lady Ur- 
sula. There are no "other people." What they do on 
the stage is evanescent detail. No one cares for what 
they say; no one remembers. If we except Charles Wal- 
cot, in the r61e of Rev. Mr. Blimbo, who stays on the stage 
a little longer than the rest of the accessories, the play 
may be said to consist of two parts, that of Sir George 
Syivester and that of Lady Ursula. As I said last week, 
the play is light. There is little to remember. Its aphor- 
isms are some centuries out of their teens. Its moral, or 
lack thereof, is neither of the dryasdust kind, nor is even 
reminiscent of what I might term a blind suggestion. It 
is just the ordinary talk that surrounds an ordinary plot, 
and is a thousand leagues below the crisp, crackliog dia- 
logue of Stanley Weyman's stories of that period. There 
is not really a serious situation. The attempted duel with 
pistols would never have taken place; this the audience 
knew as well as Sir George 
Sylvester. And here is where 
Anthony Hope really missed 
his chance. The duel shouid 
have come off. As a gentle- 
man, Sir George had no right 
to say that he d.d not want to 
murder the brother of Lady 
Ursula, or be murdered by him. 
The dramatist had no right 
to treat so lightly the honor 
of an English nobleman; for 
by doing that he showed his 
inability to grasp and use a 
great situation. The men in 
the room do not know that 
"young Barrington" is in fact 
Lady Ursula. The latter is 
not even certain that Sir 
George knows that she is 
masquerading as her brother. 
Sir George claims to have 
been grievously offended by 
Barrington, and unless mutual 
friends prevented the duel, as 
a man of honor and in accord- 
ance with the code, Sir 
George could not step back 
under any plea whatsoever. When a man compels 
another to face the point of his sword or his pistol, and the 
other takes up the challenge to vindicate his honor, it be- 
speaks a lack of courage and honor to plead anything. 
Shot or cut is the only solution. 

If, therefore, Barrington or Sir George had really fired, 
and one, preferably Barrington, had been wounded and his 
sex had been discovered by all present, the situation would 
have been very strong, how strong only an artist like 
Henry Miller knows. That would have been a real " ad- 
venture.' 1 The mere masquerading in boys' clothes is not 
such a wonderfully artistic feat. Talk— small talk— and 
an occasional pat on the back, which jars the delicate body 
of the "youngman," may provoke a laugh, but it is not 
dramatic action. There is nothing very dramatic when 
"young Barrington" breaks down and cries as the cur- 
tain goes down in the third act. Merely a case of over- 
wrought nerves. However, we can let that pass. The 
censure against the dramatist is to point out his lack of 
appreciation of the dramatic situations, and his misrep- 
resentation of the character of a gentleman. He at- 

" The apparel oft proclaims the man." declared Polonius in his 
eloquent sermon to Laertes. .1. M. Litchfield & Co., at 10 Post 
street, make the best-fitting and accurately proper military suits to 
be found in San Francisco. They use nothing but the finest mater- 
ials, employ only the best cutters and tailors, and have the swell 
army trade uf the city. They also do fashionable tauoring for gen- 
eral wear. 

11 you don't drink Jackson's Napa Soda you don't know what's good. 




Mrs. Ernestine Ereling. 



tempts to show us a fire eater in the Earl of Hassenden, 
and sends him from the stage a mere puppet, a lame duck. 
E. J. Morgan must feel this fact: for with all his splendid 
talent he is unable to infuse character into the part he 

plays. 

» • * 

I cannot enter into the individual faults of the play, 
when such two artists as Henry Miller and Margaret 
Anglin are covering them by the matchlessness of their 
acting. Then again there is the staging, which blinds the 
eye and lulls the soul with wondrous delight, and there is 
Sir George Sylvester's sealskin, trimmed robe de chambre, 
in sooth a dream. Then there is the grace of Henry Mil- 
ler's acting. He says "Good night" inimitably. There 
are few actors on the stage who could repeat those words 
several times and give them the artistic variations which 
Henry Miller gives them. Then there is the singular 
"something" in Margaret Anglin's personality, which I 
know and love so well, yet which I cannot name. A com- 
bination of so many mystic forces which command instant 
attention and lasting admiration. This little woman can 
play the coy maiden, the audacious flirt, the feminine boy 
with equal skill, and she can trip up an old duelist with all 
the Vicking spirit of her race, and stamp her little foot 
and tell the doughty sword 
fighter that Lady Ursula 
doesn't squint. No, she doesn't 
squint, nor you either, Mar- 
\ garet Anglin; you see straight 

\ and you act fair, and you de- 

\ serve all the homage that 

\ fashionable and art-loving San 
\ Francisco accords your excel- 
lent ability. 
\ * # * 

\ Irwin Eveleth Hassell, the 
i young aspirant for excellence 
! in piano playing, leaves for 
I Europe on Sunday evening, 
I July 2nd. He goes direct to 
/ Berlin, and will spend some 
/ years in musical studies in the 
/ great Kaiserstadt. Irwin is 
/ the only son of Mr. Hassell, 
/ Secretary of the California 
Wine Makers' Corporation. 
The fact that Irwin is an only 
son, and that he goes away to 
stay away for years, is not a 
matter for pity. Hundreds of 
others have had similar ex- 
periences. The reflection that 
comes to me is that we have in our midst men who are 
willing to bring any sacrifice for the sake of art. In part- 
ing with his only son, Mr. Hassell also parts with the 
rest of his family. His wife and his two daughters go 
with the son to care for his physical comforts while he is 
studying. What spirit indwells the American man 1 What 
mental process is at work to make a man a slave to gold 
and a slave to the sublimest arts at the same time ? Here 
is an American standing at the head of a great business 
concern, yet thinks little of taking upon himself something 
like actual martyrdom to afford his children a good educa- 
tion in their chosen career. I know of but one other case 
here where a man who for years gave up association, com- 
fort, and spent his hard-earned money for the sake of art 
— this man is the husband of Mrs. Birmingham, whom I 
consider the finest contralto in the State. Let no one tell 
me that these people do all these things, bring all these 
sacrifices for " what is in it " at the end. I will not look - 
at the sordid side of things. There is no denying that to 
bring a hard-headed business man to spend his dollars he 
must have become convinced that the investment will 
yield good returns, and when such a man does that, he 
has a soul, a heart, a sense for the sublime, a love for the 
divine in human lives. Is not a man like that preferable 
to the phrase-mongers and Pharisees, who "talk" art, 
but are not willing to do anything for it. The coming gen- 
eration in America, particularly in California, will com- 
mand the respect of Europeans in every branch of educa- 
tion. We will have the best artists and the best musi- 



July i, 1890. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



clans in the world. Who knows, the time may come when 
we shall be independent of the Italian singers. Just now 
we must pay our homage to the Italians, though we cannot 
go too close to some of tbem. I trust Young Hassell will 
come back a finished artist, to repay in a measure the 
sacrifices of his father and to fulfill the hope of his many 
friends. Bon voyage! 

* • • 

The sweetest voice God did not give exclusively to the 
nightingale— there is Mme. Pasquali, at the Orpbeum. 
That is a marvelous trio, Mr. and Mrs. Pasquali and our 
own Abramoff, whose basso profundo Is heard to great ad- 
vantage. Apropos of Sig. Abramoff, he is one of the 
clever artists hailing originally from the Czar's domain, 
who has not changed his name to Lumperini, or Lauser- 
ini, and he sings just as well. The Orpheum offers splen- 
did attractions this week, and the best of them is the trio 
in the prison scene of Faust. 

• * # 

McCoy, one of the foremost music teachers on the Coast, 
gave the Oaklanders a surprise on Friday night. His 
pupils showed what thorough tuition can accomplish when 
there is good material to work on. Mr. McCoy is parti- 
cularly great in orchsstrating, and men like Damrosh, 
Sousa and others are reaping golden harvests with the 
work done by him. Adolphb Danziqee. 



Next Monday evening will be an important day and date 
on the calendar of the Tivoli Theatre, for on Monday, July 
3, 1899, the Tivoli will have reached its twentieth year an- 
niversary. During that long period the doors have 
been closed but a few times, and more than seven thou 
sand performances have been given. The history of the 
Tivoli has been one of uninterrupted success. It has kept 
pace with the progress of the city, and has universally 
given a show for half-a-dollar that could not be equaled 
for variety, talent, and general excellence in any other 
city in the country. Mrs. Kreling, the proprietor of this 
popular play-house, has every reason to feel proud of this 
anniversary which the Tivoli has so happilv reached, and 
she is to be congratulated, for there are few charities in 
San Francisco that are not indebted to her for the volun- 
tary assistance the Tivoli has freely given them from time 
to time. May both the Tivoli and its proprietor live to 
enjoy many happy anniversaries. 

Frederick the Great has played to the capacity of the 
Alcazar all of this week, and will, no doubt, close to-mor- 
row evening to standing room. The attraction to. follow 
on Monday will be of more than ordinary interest, for two 
distinct plays will be embraced in the one evening's pro- 
gramme, that of Don Caesar De Bazan and Only tlie Master 
Shall Blame. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison have been identified 
with the characters of Don Caesar, and Maritana, the 
gypsy, for a number of years, and their excellent presen- 
tations of the characters have won for them many warm 
compliments. Only ihe Master Shall Blame is something 
new. It is a drama in one act from the pen of Charlotte 
Thompson, and draws in a very interesting and refined 
manner a story taken from life, and the title from Kip- 
ling's L'Envoie. Miss Thompson is a California woman 
and well-known in this city; in the presentation of her new 
play she shows keen talent at plot-making for the stage 
craft. The action to this dainty mite of dramatic litera- 
ture is keen with interest, and bids for the play and au- 
thoress much promise in the dramatic field. A special 
matinee will be given Tuesday, July. 4th. 

The Orpheum's new people include Hayes & Lytton, the 
dramatic stars, who have made such a hit in vaudeville; J. 
Morie, the "Tourist Juggler," from Europe; the Gardner 
Bros., musical comedians. The hold-overs are the Pas- 
qualis in another opera scene; the Farrells, cake-walkers; 
Cressy & Dayne, the Four O'Learys, and Melville & Stet- 
son. An extra matinee is announced for Tuesday, July 4th, 
with regular matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

The Adventure of Lady Ursula will be seen all next week 
at the Columbia, and will be followed by Lord and Lady 
Algy. 

Oliver Morosco, of the Grand Opera House, has effected 
a lease of the Burbank Theatre, Los Angeles, and will open 
it on the first of August as a part of Morosco's circuit. 



An important announcement regarding the Grand 
Opera House is that the company now performing there 
will not conclude their season, as originally intended, July 
15tb, but are now a permanent organization under the 
sole management of Walter Morosco. Sir Jules Benedict's 
charming opera, The Lily of Killarnry, is crowding the 
Grand Opera House, and it has several times happened 
during the week that the box-office has had to refuse 
money, not even having standing room to dispose of. For 
next week the renowned opera, Tin Beggar Student, is an- 
nounced. It is only the uninformed who are unaware of the 
fame of this great lyric work, which always, when prop- 
erly presented, attracts the public. It is most elaborately 
and uniquely staged, and will be given with a magnificent 
cast. There will be a special matinee on Tuesday next, 
July 4th. At every matinee the best reserved seats in the 
house can be purchased for twenty-five cents. 

The romantic opera, Shamus O'Brien, will be continued 
for another week at the Tivoli, with Denis O'Sullivan in 
the title r61e. The opera has drawn crowded houses this 
week, and the play is presented with an admirable quality 
and balance highly appreciated by the lovers of good act- 
ing and good singing. 

End up your spree and taper off and sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Alcazar Theatre. 



Fred Belasco, Leasee. Mark Thall, 
Manager. 'Phone Main &>4. 

Week oommenoing July 3d. Speolal matinee July 4th. Stu- 
pendous double bill, 

ONLY THE MASTER SMALL BLAME 

And 

DON GAESAR DE BAZAN. 

Lewis Morrison. Florence Roberts, and the Alcazar Company 
supporting. Special wardr bes and settings of the period.. 
Our never-deviating prices prevail: lt.c, iibo., 35c, 50o. 

C-J __L' TL J. Gottlob, Marx & Co., 

OlUmDia I heaxre. LesseeB and Managers. 

Beginning next Monday, second and last week. Special holiday 
matinee Tuesday. Charles Frohman presents 

HENRY MILLER 

and a 

SPECIAL COMPANY 

in a superb production of Anthony Hope's romantic comedy 
THE ADVENTURE OF THE LADY URSULA 
Next production, the great Empire Theatre success. "Lord and 
Lt>dy Algy." For the first time in this country outside of New 
York City. 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell St. 
between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Orpheum 

Week oommenoing Sunday, July 2d. 

HAYES Z> LYTTON, 

. In "A Wise Guy"; J. Morie, the tourist juggler; Gardner 
Brothers, musical comedians: The Pasqualls, In scene from 
Faast; the Farrells; dessyA Dayne; 4 O'Learys; Melville & 
Stetson. 

Reserved seats 25o; balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats 
50c. Matinees Wednesday. Saturday and Sunday. 
Special matinee Tuesday, July 4th. 



Grand Opera House. 



Morosco Amusement Co., Inc., 
Lessees. 



This week. Last performances of 

THE LILY OF KILLARNEY. , 
Week of Monday. July 3d, MlUooker's best opera, 

THE BEGGAR STUDENT. 

Our new prioes— Orchestra, 35 and 50c, ; Entire Dress Circle, re- 
served 25c ; Entire Family Circe, reserved, 15c ; Gt*Hery, 10c 
Maticee Saturday; ext, a matinee July 4th. At tbe matinee 
the best reserved seat in the theatre) may be bought for S5o 
Family circle, i5c ; gallery, 10c Branch box office ]ust inside 
of main entrance of Emporium. 



Tivoli Opera House- 



MBS. Ernestine Kreling, 

Proprietor and Manager. 

Positively two weeks^nly; the society event, Donnis O'Sulli- 
van in the romantic opera, 



SHAMUS O'BRIEN. 



Anunequaledoast; enlarged chorus; magnificent soenery. 
Matinee Saturday at 2 o'clook. 
Popular Prices : 25o. and 5uo. 



Our telephone, Bush 9. 



THE SANTA GRUZ 
OF ALAMEDA ^_ 



SUNNY GOVE BATHS 



A select summer resort for 
Take Narrow Gauge trains. 



bathing, camping, and boating 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July i, 1899. 



THE CONQUEST OF THE PHILIPPINES.— A RETROSPEOT 
AND A PROSPECT. 

EDITOR News Letter, Dear Sir: — ODe year ago, upon 
my return trip from the Orient, I wrote as follows: 
S. S. Coptic, Tuesday, June 21. 1898. 

" Last night, at 1:30 a. m., I was awakened by three 
sharp blasts of our ship's whistle saluting the passing 
transports to Manila. Alas! alas I and alas I — enthusiasm 
now, but later on sickness, suffering, misery, squalid death 
under the pitiless sun of a tropical sky in an alien land. 
And still later on for those who remain at home, taxesl 
taxes 1 taxes! Such is the glory and the cost of war. 
When all the burdens of it are settled on the backs of the 
people, then look out for political and social revolutions at 
home. As the war has been repeatedly referred to by my 
correspondents, I will say I'm no Jingo; don't believe in 
the doctrine of island expansion, annexation or conquest, 
but fear that the American people are lending a willing 
ear to the suggestions of pride, ambition, and avarice, 
rather than to the sober and wholesome dictates of wisdom, 
prudence, aDd justice. Spain's colonies have ruined her." 

Last January I summarized the war craze thus: 

"The policy of the present United States Congress and 
the Executive Administration may be summed up as hav- 
ing shown four stages of progressive development: 

First: Yellow Journalism and hysteria. 

Second: Revenge and elemental ferocity. 

Third: Militarism and pride of power. 

Fourth: Ambition, greed and ignorance." 

In February I made the following observations as to the 
effects of war in a tropical country upon American 
soldiers: 

" WheD the Government of the United States despatches 
shipload after shipload of unacclimated young men to the 
everglades and jungles of tropical swamps, whether in the 
East Indies or West Indies, it is consigning the flower of 
American youth to unimaginable suffering, and too often, 
alasl to hapless and inglorious death." And I added: 
''Do you think this overdrawn? Do you think this is an 
extreme view of the case? Let me quote a sketch by an 
eye witness, a well-known New York writer, of the em- 
barking of sick and wounded soldierson board a transport 
hospital ship homeward bound. 

"That day strange figures began to mount the sides of 
the ship, and to occupy its every turn and angle of space. 
Some of them fell on their knees and slapped the bare 
deck with their hands, and laughed and cried out 'Thank 
God, I'll see God's country again!' Some of the men were 
regulars, bound in bandages; some were volunteers, dirty 
and hollow-eyed, with long beards on boys' faces. Some 
came on crutches; others with their arms around the 
shoulders of their comrades staring ahead of them with a 
fixed smile, their lips drawn and their teeth protruding. 
At every second step they stumbled, and the face of each 
man was swept by swift ripples of pain. They lay on cots 
so close together that the nurses could not walk between 
them. They lay on the wet decks, in the scuppers, and 
along the skylights and hatches. They were like ship- 
wrecked mariners clinging to a raft, and they asked 
nothing more than that the ship's bow be turned toward 
home." 

It is interesting to remember that the Paris Peace 
Commission, that aggregation of American wisdom, de- 
cided in its combined sagacity that an army of five thou- 
sand men would be ample to control the Philippines. 
General Lawton said recently, after his very creditable 
experience in the field, that 100,000 men will be required 
to hold and pacify the Philippines, or more than four times 
the strength of our old army. In addition we will need 
from 25,000 to 50,000 in this country, Puerto Rico and 
Cuba. (It is assumed that Cuba is to be annexed, since 
our patent laws have already been extended to that island 
by the Assistant Secretary of War.) 

The latest statistics on the subject (by Edw. W. Harden) 
allege that the total exports of the Philippine Islands are 
$41,000,000 Mexican dollar currency per annum, or, say, 
$20,000,000 gold, U. S. currency. We know that an army 
of 23,000 men costs us yearly not less than $23,000,000 in 
the Dnited States. 100,000 men in the Philippines will 
cost us over six times as much, owing to the expense of 



transporting supplies, etc., or, say, $140,000,000 per year. 

Now where is the profit to come in — the profit to the 
American tax payer — the American workingman? With 
an outlay seven times as great as the entire commerce of 
the islands, where are we to recoup ourselves? — for Colonel 
Denby has said that we have taken the islands for con- 
siderations of profit solely? The commerce of the islands, 
even were it all profit, does not come anywhere near the 
cost of the "keep" of our soldiers, and anyway their com- 
merce goes chiefly to other nations than the United States. 
The cost of maintaining an army of 35,000 men in the is- 
lands is now some $5,000,000 per month, or $60,000,000 
per year; and in the same ratio for one of 100,000 men the 
cost to Uncle Sam for the same period would be over 
$170,000,000. Just when will the ledger balance? And if 
the opinion of the officers of the "Raleigh" and other 
government officials should turn out to be correct, the 
army will have to be further increased to 150,000, in which 
event the cost would jump to $255,000,000 per annum — an 
expensive luxury. And the American tax payer will have 
to foot the bills — they never can be collected from the is- 
landers. And besides we have paid $20,000,000 spot cash 
for the bargain, tool our title to which is so astonishingly 
clouded. Has Uncle Sam fallen into the hands of the 
Philistines? 

In this connection I may mention that in the San Fran- 
cisco press of June 22nd appeared the following: "In the 
matter of bodily losses we are told that 664 men have been 
killed, and 6,500 wounded and invalided." And, "An army 
officer returned from Manila made the astonishing state- 
ment to-day that eighty per cent of the soldiers in the 
Philippines will get pensions for dysentery and other in- 
testinal complaints." 

And another officer, referred to as of high rank, and 
well qualified to speak, asserted, in substance, that the 
war in the Philippines is costing the government at the 
present time at the rate of $8,000,000 per month. The 
cost mounts steadily higher and higher, month by month, 
as the carnival of death and destruction goes on. Bear 
in mind that here we are only considering dollars. Human 
life is cheapl Our care is wholly for pelf. Commissioner 
Denby has said it, in regard to this precious scheme of 
"Benevolent Assimilation." 

The outcome of the last six months' operations was fore- 
told by Spanish officers, who said, "The Americans will 
win the battles, but the Filipinos will win the campaign," 
and this is confirmed by the admission of such officers as 
General Greene, General Reeve, General Lawton, General 
King, General Hall, Fleet Engineer Ford, Captain Clay, 
Captain McQueston, and others too numerous to mention. 
For particulars see San Francisco press of June 22nd. 

In April I averred : "All that this country can possibly 
acquire (as a result of expansion in the Philippines) is 
perplexing responsibility, continued unrest and tumult, 
and liability to constant altercation and even warfare. As 
agains t this there is not one single redeeming feature, moral, 
commercial, political, or otherwise. In fact, to say noth- 
ing of the enormities of the last two months' occurrences, 
the whole scheme is a wild-goose chase of the most idiotic 
kind. From my standpoint, no more insane caprice than 
this fad of colonial expansion into oriental tropical islands 
has ever before possessed our people. The old delusions 
and follies of the past: John Law's money, the Mississippi 
bubble, the South Sea Islands scheme, the Mulberry Cul- 
ture, the Biue Grass mania, and the Free Silver craze, 
seem all combined in this last spasm of political delirium 
tremens." 

As to the present status, and in conclusion, I will use 
the language of Colonel Robert G. Ingersoll. In the eyes 
of clerical expansionists he is doubtless an infidel, but in 
my opinion he is a courageous liberty-loving man, brave 
enough to champion the cause of Humanity. Colonel In- 
gersoll says : 

" I have one sentiment for the soldiers,— cheers for the 
living and tears for the dead. If it were meet to weep 
over the sacred dust of the brave who died to render our 
flag stainless and keep it in the sky, it is now in order to 
flood the graves of the boys who are falling in the Philip- 
pine Islands For they are not fighting to add luster to 
Old Glory' or to save the Union, but as mere machines 
at the behest of the Administration, which for the time be- 



July I. 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



me is the Government of the United States. 

" War with Spain, (or which the volunteer took up arms, 
has lonir since ended. Congress has not declared war 
against the Filipinos nor voted money to carry on a for- 
eign war of conquest. Then why this thunder of guns, the 
flying thunderbolts of hell, and these new-made graves as 
numberless as the stars? It is a war not in behalf of lib- 
erty, but against it. Our arms are not adding glory to 
the flag, but instead are staining that starry emblem of 
freedom with the blood and tears of a people fighting for 
the rights of self-government. The soldier is not to blame. 
It has always been considered a glorious thing todie fight- 
ing for truth, liberty, and eternal right. But when one 
falls in the Philippine war there burns no balo of glory 
above his dust, but bis sad, untimely, uncalled-for death 
causes tears to moisten the eyes of every patriot in the 
land. Therefore, when he falls in such a war his bier 
should be draped in deepest mourning and drenched with 
the tears cf his fellow-countrymen. 

" Take Colonel Stotzenberg as an example. No braver, 
truer soldier ever wore uniform or marched in the shadow 
of a flag. He only recently remarked that he was sick of 
such a war and looked forward to the near future when he 
and his brave volunteers would be relieved from killing 
men who were fighting for independence. He arrived on 
the battlefield fresh from the arms of his wife at Manila; 
at the head of his regiment, leading a charge, he fell, 
pierced through the heart. What great principle did he 
die for? Will the administration please answer?" 

John J. Valentine. 
San Francisco, June 24, 1899. 



THAT TRIP TO YOSEMITE. 



Editor News Letter : I have just seen a squib, printed 
first in your paper and now being quoted elsewhere, 
in regard to Edwin Markham and his alleged indifference 
to his fellows, as shown on a certain camping trip. 

Mr. Markham did go to Yosemite in 1897 with a party, 
and was one of the most helpful members of the excursion. 
He took for his part the arduous and responsible duty of 
driving the six-horse wagon in and out of the valley. As 
a man had been hired to do cooking and another to care 
for the teams, supply fuel, etc., it would scarcely seem 
that Mr. Markham need also be called to use axe or frying 
pan. 

As to his courtesy toward the ladies: one example. He 
was the only one of the party who went provided with a 
mattress. This he at once gaveup to a sick lady, roughing 
it like the others afterward. 

Mr. Markham's kindness toward others and his indiffer- 
ence to his own comfort, his sense of absolute justice and 
equality, are among his most marked characteristics. His 
offering to share his excess of salary with the teachers in 
his school until each fared equally with himself, is a fact 
that can be verified by the asking. It was only because 
the teachers protested that he did not carry out the plan. 

No one who knows Mr. Markham doubts his disinterested 
care for those about him. More than one poor family in 
Oakland can testify that they were saved from want this 
winter from his slender purse. 

One Who Knows. 

Oakland, June 21, 1899. 



1 The Frenchman likes his native wine, 
The German likes his beer, 
The Irishman likes his whiskey straight 
Because it gives good cheer; 
The Englishman likes his 'alt and 'all 
Because It makes him frisky; 
But they all go baok on their favorite drink 
For Jesse Moore "AA" Whiskey." 



Champagne Imports In 1898 
Aggregated 242,319 cases, of which 86,855 caBes were G. H. Mumm's 
Extra Dry, the acme of perfection. Bottles will bear green neck- 
band and star label. 

The Grand Hotel Cafe fills the want of hundreds of business men 
every day between the hours of 11:30 and 2 o'clock, for the cafe is a 
popular well-kept place, and the luncheon is always served in the 
most appetizing manner possible. The best the markets afford is 
always to be had. Foster & Pay are expert caterers. 

Do you drink? Then mix Jackson's Napa Soda with your tipple. 



CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTERN R7 GO. 

Lessee o( San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



THE PICTURESQUE, ROUTE OF CALIFORNIA. 



SPECIAL RATES 

FOR THE 

4th OF JULY 

On Sunday, Mondau and Tuesdau . . July 2, 3 311(1 4 

Round Trip Tickets will be sold from San Francisco 
to all points north of San Rafael at the rate of 

ONE SINGLE FARE »'o«ow 8 : 



Petalnma $100 

Santa Rosa.... 1.60 
Bebastopol .. . 1.80 
Guerneville 2.60 



Windsor $1 95 

Healdsburg... 2 25 

Lytton 2 40 

Geyserville. . . . 2.55 



Return limit WEDNESDAY, July 5, 1899. 



Cloverdale 3 00 

Hopland 3 80 

Ukiab 4.60 

Sonoma 1.00 

Glen Elleu 1.20 



On FRIDAY, JUNE, 30th, and SATURDAY, JULY 1st 

Round Trip Tickets will be sold from San Francisco to all 
points norm of San Rafael at the following reduced rates ; 



Petaluraa $1 50 

Santa Rosa 2 25 

Sebastopol. ... 2.70 
Guerneville .... 3.75 



Windsor $2 95 

Healdsburg. .. 3.40 

Lytton 3.60 

Geyserville... 3.85 



Return limit, WEDNESDAY, July 5, 1899. 



Cloverdale 4.50 

Sonoma 1 50 

Glen Ellen 1.80 

Hopland 5.00 

Dkiah 5.00 



For further information apply at Ticket Office, 650 Market street, 
Chronicle Building, or Tiburon Ferry, Foot of Market street. 
General Office: Mutual Life Building, 222 Sansome street. 



H. C. Whiting. General Manager. 



R. X. Rtah, Gen. Pass. Agt. 




1 The Take-It-Ezu Swing 



•Is a Hammock, Sv/ing and 
Ghair combined. Perfeot ease af- 
I'ordid lo the head, back and limbs. 
Changes position automatically by 
moving the body to the position de- 
sired. The swing balances no mat- 
ter what the position of the tody. 
Used indoors, on theveraDda, lawn, 
picnic-* and just the thing for camp- 
ers. Constructed of hardwood, mal- 
leable iron and fancy striped can- 
vas. Weighs 33 pounds. Guaranteed 
to hold 300 pouuos. Can be folded 
into space required for a 6- root step- 
ladder, l^rice $5 f o b.. San Fran- 
cKco. Money refunded if not as 
represented. 

Western Advertising Gompanu 

313 Bush St.. 8an Francisco 



ELECTRIC LAUNDRY is our name, 

Linen we clean, make 

Each article so bright and clean 

Can see your face in polished sheen. 

To catch us quick by telephone 

Ring up our call, South 231. 

In all our work we aim to please, 

Can do so with the greatest ease. 

Let him who well deserves high praise 

And does his best in all his days, 

Unite with all good men and true, 

Nor fail to give each one his due. 

Do this and we will keep you clean, 

Rinse from your conscience all things mean, 

You surely want thus to be seen. 

ELECTRIC LAUNDRY CO., 835 FoLSOM St. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July I, itgq. 



2Ie7. 
UitW 




The Rough Riders. One of the most attractive maga- 
zine features of the year have been 
the papers upon the Cuban campaign which have appeared 
serially in Scribner's, by Colonel Theodore Roosevelt. 
These have now been brought out, revised and enlarged in 
book form, with many handsome pictures, and it is safe to 
say that " The Rough Riders" is one of the best books that 
the Spanish war has produced. The author has put much 
of his own strong personality into the telling of these sto- 
ries. His style is simple and direct, but graphic, while a 
love for anecdote and a certain sense of humor relieve the 
tension of a long record of peril, hardship, exposure and 
death. The official title of the regiment was the First 
United States Volunteer Cavalry, "but," the author says, 
"for some reason or other the public promptly christened 
us 'Rough Riders.' At first we fought against the use of 
the term, but to no purpose; and when finally the Generals 
of Divisions and Brigade began to write in formal commu- 
nications about our regiment as the 'Rough Riders,' we 
adopted the term ourselves." Dr. Leonard Wood, who, 
under General Miles, had served in many inconceivably 
harassing campaigns against the Apaches, where he had 
displayed such courage that he won that most coveted of 
distinctions — the medal of honor, was a warm personal 
friend of Colonel Roosevelt, who, during the year preceding 
the outbreak of the Spanish War, was Assistant Secre- 
tary of the Navy. When Congress authorized the raising 
of three cavalry regiments from among the wild riders 
and riflemen of the Rockies and the Great Plains, Secre- 
tary Alger, knowing that Colonel Roosevelt had spent 
many years in the Northwest in bunting trips and amongst 
the cowboys and mountain hunters, and furthermore that 
"he was determined to go to the front somehow or other," 
offered him the command of one of them. Being inexperi- 
enced in military work, it was decided that Dr. Wood 
should go as the Colonel of the regiment. The mustering 
places for the regiment were appointed in New Mexico, 
Arizona, Oklahoma and Indian Territory. The difficulty 
was not in selecting, but in rejecting meu, applications 
from every part of the Union pouring in. In the arming, 
equipping, mounting and disciplining of the men lay the 
real difficulty. Numerous companies were proffered from 
various States, but it was only from the four Territories 
that organized bodies were allowed to be accepted. "But," 
the writer says, "owing to the fact that the number of 
men originally allotted to us, 780, was speedily raised to 
1,000, we were given a chance to accept quite a number of 
eager volunteers who did not come from the Territories, 
but who possessed precisely the same temper that distin- 
guished our Southwestern recruits, and whose presence 
materially benefited the regiment. We drew recruits 
from Harvard, Yale, Princeton and many another college; 
from clubs like the Somerset of Boston and Knickerbocker 
of New York, and from among the men who belonged neither 
to club nor college, but in whose veins the blood stirred 
with the same impulse which once sent the Vikings over 
the sea." Such was the forming of the regiment whose 
men gave it its peculiar character. Most interesting are 
the author's descriptions of many of the captains and lieu- 
tenants; natural leaders of men, many of them; some of 
them formerly campaigners in the regular army against 
Apache, Ute and Cheyenne, all — "Easterners, Westerners, 
Northerners and Southerners, officers and men, cowboys 
and college graduates, wherever they came from, and what- 
ever their social position — possessing in common the traits 
of hardihood and a thirst for adventure." One character- 
istic and distinctive contingent which could have appeared 
in only just such a regiment, was a number of Indians — 
Cherokees, Cbickasaws, Choctaws and Creeks. "Only a 
few were of pure blood," the author says, "the others 



shaded off until they were absolutely indistinguishable from 
their white comrades, with whom, it may be mentioned, 
they all lived on terms of complete equality." 

As is well known, this regiment was in the first expedi- 
tion to leave our shores. Of the six days steady sail south- 
ward and eastward through the wonderful sapphire seas 
of the West Indies toward the unknown, of the first 
glimpse of the Cuban coast, of the landing at Daquiri, of 
the first fight fought and won on Cuban soil, of the won- 
derful charge of the Rough Riders on San Juan Hill, of the 
many deeds of conspicuous gallantry there performed, of 
the days spent in the trenches before Santiago, of the 
surrender of the Spanish, of the return home and the month 
spent at Montauk before disbanding, and of what has be- 
fallen some of the Rough Riders since the regiment dis- 
banded, no true American should fail to inform himself 
from Colonel Roosevelt's book. It is impossible to read 
this record of brave deeds and noble deaths without a stir- 
ring of the pulses and a deepening thrill of patriotism. 
Oo closing the book one knows something of the feeling 
which made brave "Bucky" O'Neill exclaim: "Who 
would not risk his life for a star ?" 

The Rough Riders : by Tbeoiore Roosevelt, Colonel of the First Volun- 
teer Cavalry. Coarles Scribner's Sons, Publishers. For sale at the Em- 
porium, price Jl.feO. , 

Tho Man With The much-talked-of poem, "The Man 
the Hoo, With the Hoe," by Mr. Edwin Mark- 

And Other Poems, ham, with several other poems by the 
same gifted writer, some of which 
have been published from time to time in Scribner's, The 
Century, The Atlantic and The San Francisco Examiner, are 
now issued in book form by the Doubleday & McClure Com- 
pany. Much has been written about the initial poem, which 
gives its name to the book, and the same altruistic spirit 
— so notable therein — is seen more or less in almost every 
page of Mr. Markham's writings. Dean Hodges, in his 
suggestive work on " Faith and Social Service," points 
out that progress in commerce, politics, and industry call 
for a more willing service of man to man, that education 
and religion are being deeply affected by the idea that 
"man liveth not to himself alone," and that in an import- 
ant sense he is " his brother's keeper," and that he will 
be held measurably responsible for his welfare. Besides 
the poem that first made the author famous there are 
many others that deal with life's inequalities. Particu- 
larly strong and fine is " The Rock-Breaker," a pen pic- 
ture that lingers in the mind, even as does that of Millet. 
It is safe to say that Mr. Markham's songs are not des- 
tined " to perish like the shapes of air," for: 

" On heights afar that voice is beard, 
And the dim paths he breaks to-day 
Will some time be a trodden way." 

The Man With the Hoe. and Other Poems: by Edwin Markham. Double- 
day & McClure Company, Publishers. New York. For sale by A. M. 
Robertson. Price, $1.00. 

The Jamesons. Stories of New England life, as depicted 
by Miss Wilkins, have an abiding place 
in the best affections of lovers of simple, homely tales. 
The story of the Jamesons is strung together on the 
slightest of threads, but is written in the author's best 
manner, and is just long enough to while away a summer 
day. To quiet little Linnville whose inhabitatts prided 
themselves that nobody in their village had ever taken 
boarders, came one day the Grover stage-coach and stop- 
ping at Mrs. Liscom's, five boarders — mother, grand- 
mother, two daughters and a son — were seen to alight. 
Their advent was marked by much speculation. 
Mrs. Jameson who had a weakness for Robert Browning 
and hygienic bread and several other little hobbies, en- 
deavors to enlarge the sphere of those about her. How 
she succeeded in her efforts to educate the people of 
Linnville in beauty and to establish improvements of all 
sorts in their midst, attacking their most time honored 
institutions, Miss Wilkins tells with inimitable charm and 
much humor. A love tangle between Mrs. Jameson's eld- 
est daughter and Mrs. Liscom's only son is smoothed out 
to the satisfaction of the young people, and at a pretty 
October wedding the minister receives a larger wedding 
fee than often falls to a minister in Linnville. 

The Jamesons: by Mary E. Wilkins. Doubleday & McClure Co., Pub- 
lishers, New York. Forsaleat The Emporium. Price 98c. 



July i, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THE CRYSTAL PALACE. 

THIS evening the new Crystal Palace, with entrci 
at 5 Kearnv and 12 Geary street, will be thrown open 
to the public. The place has been in the hands of pa 
decorators, carpenters and furnishers for several 
past, and its opening shows what excellent taste and lav- 
ish expenditure of money can accomplish. It has 
nearly doubled in size, and is without doubt thr 
artistic cafe in the city. The ceilings have been beauti 
fully frescoed, and Cupids, angels, garlanded with flower.-, 
disport themselves thereon in a gorgeous sea of green and 
gold. The entire furnishings are in the Louis XV" style. 
The walls are hung with choicest paintings, all of which 
are good, some of them especially fine. "Marguerite in 
the Church" occupies the position of honor. This canvas is 
6 by 9 feet, and in detail, composition and feeling, is truly 
a work of art. The sneering Mephisto, the sad, despair- 
ing face of Marguerite, are all there; the tense clasped 
hands, the attitude of the yielding figure, speaks elo- 
quently of the broken heart. A " Corner in the Kitchen" 
is a still life, not so large, and is a totally different subject. 
The central figure in the canvas is a deer, and it is drawn 
to the life. The utensils about it, the manner in which the 
dead animal lies, the vivid blood and stained knife are 
realistic to a degree. "The Wounded Soldier," "The 
Bashful Girl," a "Venetian Masquerader" " The Mon- 
astery Cobbler," " The Conspirators," and others are 
richly worth a visit to the Crystal Palace. Mr. I. Deutch, 
the proprietor, has fitted up the Cafe without regard 
to cost, and the result is a handsome combination. The 
Palace is lighted by rich and beautiful electric and gas 
chandeliers. A fine lunch will be served from 11 until 2 
o'clock every day, when the inner man may feel sure of get- 
ting excellent solids, pure liquids, and the most attentive 
service. 

S DAINTY green cover, with handsome new design by 
Bull of San Francisco, incloses a number of meritor- 
ious articles in "Sunset" for May. "Education in Califor- 
nia," "The Kings River Canyon" and "Hunting in Mexico, 
all handsomely illustrated, are of leading interest, supple- 
mented by the sixth installment of "Chronicles of a High- 
way," and a short story, "The Cruise of the Silver Shill- 
ing." "Sunset" is published by the Southern Pacific 
Company at San Francisco, and with this — number one of 
the third volume — enters on its second year. It is in every 
way worthy of the interest with which it is received. 

WE regret to learn of the death of A. E. Quintard Esq., 
a well-known banker and ship-owner of New York 
City. Mr. Quintard is the father of Mrs. Nicholls, the 
estimable wife of the Rt. Rev. W. F. Nicholls D. D., L. 
L. D., Bishop of California. Mr. Quintard's interests were 
chiefly in the Southern States, whose best interests he had 
greatly at heart. He will be sorely missed by his friend 
Bishop H. C. Potter of New York and by the P. E. Church 
generally. His eminently practical turn of mind, and his 
quiet, munificent charities, were known to but few. 

OVER 30 years ago the dry goods house of J. J. O'Brien 
& Co. was opened for the first time by its founder, 
the late J. J. O'Brien, who, up to the time of his death, 
was widely known as one of California's most popular and 
enterprising merchants. That the establishment of which 
his widow and children are now the principal owners, has 
lost none of its old-time popularity is well evidenced by the 
large number of patrons who daily throng its spacious 
aisles. 

ONE of the latest enterprises in the way of copper min- 
ing is an incorporation to work the old mine near 
Acton, in Los Angeles County, known as the King of the 
West, with a capital of $600 000. The incorporators are 
W. J. Woodside," A. Woodside, W. W., Robinson, W. D. 
Alexander, and Theodore Froelich. 

"The Overland Limited," via Chicago, Union Pacific, and 
Northwestern Line. 
Only three and one-half days to Chicago. Four and one-half days 
to New York. Pullman Vestibuled Sleepers. Pullman Dining Cars. 
Pullman Tourist Sleepers. The '-Overland Limited" leaves San 
Francisco every day in the year at 6 p. m. Cabin reservations made 
and steamship tickets sold to all parts of Europe. For full particu- 
lars and sleeper reservations address T>. W. Hitchcock, General 
Agent, No. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



THE formal opening of Hotel Lyndon, LosGfttOS, takes 
place this Saturday evening, and will be a - 
' of that beautiful town. The hotel has been hand 




Corner of Smoking Rot»n-~KotA Lyndon. 

somely finished throughout. The bedrooms and private 
suites are beautifully furnished with solid polished heavy 
oak, ash, and cherry sets and equipped with every ele- 
gant convenience. The dining-room is airy, light, and 
ample, and the billiard room provided with excellent new 
tables; the smoking-room is fitted up artistically, the 
walls are decorated with draperies and baskets and other 
work of the Arizona Indians, and the floors strewn with 
handsome rugs. It will be especially appreciated by gen- 
tlemen guests. The ladies' parlor and writing rooms are 
most tastefully decorated and luxuriously appointed. The 
entire table service at Hotel Lyndon is new — bright silver, 
sparkling cut glass, and snowy linen. The table will be 
supplied with every delicacy, and an experienced French 
chef will cater to the tastes of the guests. 



In times 01 peace; in times of war, 
The favorite drink is Jesse Moore. 



VyV^AAANAAA < ^»^VWyw^WV^^W^AAAA 



DOXEY'S 

631 Market Street 
Under Palace Hotel 



To make room for an 
entirely new Fall stock 
from London and New 
York, Mr. Duxey offers 
bis present stock of . . 



AT THE SIGN 
OF THE LARK 



BOOKS 

Current 
Standard 

and . . . 

Fine Books 



At prices never before seen in tbe West. 

EVERY BOOK MUST GO.^b- 

$2.00 Books for $1.40 
1 SO " " 1.00 
1.00 " " 70 

Everything in Proportion. 

THE LAUREL SERIES. A beautiful large cloth £Qp 
bound, gilt-'.op 12mo. book, large type, good paper **~ ~ " 
Kipling, Hawthorne, Stevenson, Du:nas. Hugo, and 1O) others. 

Open Evenings. Libraries Purchased. 



DOXEY'S B; 



IG Look 

new for tbe 

"p. IM c Yellow 

ARGAINS Signs. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 




J5iu!&»tt:Jtkl/fcl/ 



The feature of the week in the Comstock 
Ore Strike in market has been a rise in Con. Cal-Vir- 
Con. Virginia, ginia on the strength of a new find of 

ore. What the discovery amounts 
to is not certain yet, and it will take time to 
prove its value. Still the development is most encour- 
aging, showing as it does that there are chances in the 
lower levels now being unwatered which did not exist 
above. This ore was found two floors above the 1750 level, 
separated from old stopes by a few feet of low grade ore 
porphyry and clay. Superintendent Ross believes that 
this section of the mine is virgin ground, and it is cer- 
tainly so on the 1800 below, giving rise to the hope that 
the same ore will be cut there in its downward continua- 
tion. With the elevators working smoothly there will be 
no difficulty experienced in keeping the water in check, 
permitting •work to go on expeditiously in the district now 
drained. The find gave a stimulus to the market, help- 
ing all the stocks on the list more or less. Before long 
electric power will be available along the lode, arrange- 
ments having been completed during the week with a 
company about to start a plant on the Truckee, capable 
of furnishing 5,000 horse power to the mining companies at 
a large reduction on the present cost of operations. When 
this power is available the water in the South End Mines 
will be handled with ease, and an opportunity will be af- 
forded to get at rich ore bodies known to exist in the 
lower levels of Crown Point and Belcher, now submerged. 
One of the most active stocks in the market just eow is 
Potosi. Some very important work is being prosecuted 
by this company, and it will make itself felt in the market 
before long. Taking the lode as a whole, it is many years 
since work has been prosecuted so actively as it is now, 
and the prospects are bright for active trading and 
higher prices for months to come. 

There is little doing in the local Stock 

Local Stocks and Bond market. This is not an unusual 

Are Dull. condition at the holiday season of the 

year. The popularity of the sugar stocks 
as a medium for speculation seems to have died out tem- 
porarily, and most of the shares have a heavy tone, in 
spite of dividends promised and declared. Holders of 
lighting shares have troubles of their own, arising from 
uncertainties of the future, based upon threatened compe- 
tition, which, however, is still a long way off. Still, the 
shadow is in itself sufficient to scare a certain class of 
holders, who go to bed in fear and trembling every night 
lest something should occur between sundown and sunrise 
to snip a cent or two off their securities. It was some of 
those sad-eyed, nerveless creatures who dropped out of 
cable stock at a decline, from which the market was 
quickly resuscitated, the other day, because a statement 
appeared to the effect that the town would soon be 
swamped with automobiles, to the utter annihilation of 
the cable car system now in vogue. These dreaded arri- 
vals, while not here, are well established in other parts 
of the world, but in no way have they interfered with cable 
cars, let alone supplant them. Both have a sphere of use- 
fulness of their own for which they are particularly 
adapted, and which they are destined to fill without en- 
gendering opposition, the one with the other. Still, an 
idea to the contrary will undoubtedly suffice to give timid 
investors the nightmare for months and maybe years to 
come. They would not be content without worry of some 
sort. 

The quiet tone of the silver market 

A Mere Case of does not indicate the fulfillment of 

Supply and Demand, predictions rife some weeks ago 

about an advance in price which 
would carry the metal back to the old standard of $1.29. 
The situation has narrowed down so now to a position re- 
garding supply and demand, thai the market has recently 
strengthened a little in America on a strike of operators 
in Colorado. This in itself must be accppted in proof of 
dominant conditions now existing, and which are likely to 
exist in the future, regulating market prices of the metal. 



The London Financial News airs the 
A Heathen operations of a Cantonese named 

Chinee Promoter. Kang Yu Wei, who has a mission to 
perform in the way of organizing im- 
mense promotion companies among the Chinese residents 
of the United States for investment in various industries 
outlined for the progressive development of the Flowery 
Land. He calculates to raise about $60,000,000 among 
the Chinese merchants, a portion of which will be invested 
in schemes in America and elsewhere, the balance to be 
devoted to undertakings in China. This wonder of the 
Orient has not yet put in an appearance in San Francisco. 
He will have a wide field here to cover, most of his coun- 
trymen being well fixed as the result of their operations 
for years. The bulk of their money has hitherto been de- 
ported to China, and an effort to divert the bulk of it into 
local circulation will be entirely satisfactory, from an 
American standpoint. Kang can do a land-office business 
among the Chinatown swells, who are gamblers born and 
bred, if the schemes offered are as large and seductive as 
his ideas. Out here the impression would be that the en- 
terprising Kang had been dallying with the reeking bowl 
to the point of indulging in what is commonly dubbed "a pipe 
dream." 

An interesting discussion is now go- 
California Stamps ing on in London over the merits of 
Abroad. California stamps in comparison with 

old Cornish stamps. The latter, in 
use at the Dolcoath mine in Cornwall, only shows a record 
of 1.56 tons per stamp in 24 hours, while the Californian 
stamps have accomplished in the same section at least 
three, and probably four, tons in the same period of time. 
A Cornishman named J. T. Richards, of Camborne, has 
just invented what is known as a Californian stamp "guide," 
which it is claimed will save considerable cost in time and 
labor. In speaking of the invention the Mining Journal 
says: "Under the old style of guide there was considerable 
friction caused by the work being against the grain of the 
wood, and the boles consequently losing their circular 
shape through the uneven working of the stamp heads. In 
Mr. Richard's invention, the motion follows the grain of 
the wood, and as soon as signs of wear in the holed wood 
show themselves a shaving can be planed off and the halves 
come together around the stamp beads. It seems on the 
face of it a very useful idea." 

The settlement of the litigation over 
The Golden Cross the Golden Cross Mine, of San Diego 
Mine. county, will be a source of congratula- 

tion to all who are interested in the 
free and untrammeled development of mining interests 
throughout the State. The property has been badly handi- 
capped for years by law proceedings, and, had it not been 
for the prompt action of Samuel M. Shortridge, the well- 
known lawyer of this city, and his associate counsel, Jeffer- 
son Chandler, who succeeded in preventing the sale of the 
property by the Sheriff when legal proceedings were first 
instituted, the present owners would not now be in posses- 
sion. The battle in the Courts was fought vigorously, 
and the victory has been thorough and decisive. The bulk 
of she stock is now held by Colonel Isaac Trumbo, who, in 
the future, will control the destinies of the mine, which is 
a very valuable property, destined to swell the annual 
gold yield of the State" for years to come. The Golden 
Cross and other mines of the group are now incorporated 
under the name of the Free Gold Mining Company. 

The incorooration of the Occiden- 
A Sensible tal Exploration Company in this 

Business Proposition, city is a step in the right direc- 
tion. Time and again this idea has 
been urged upon the promoters of mining enterprises 
abroad, that the development of prospects was the safest 
and most profitable avenue to wealth. Ready made mines 
as a rule are a dangerous investment. Frequently there 
is a nigger in the fence somewhere, or the owner of a pay- 
ing and apparently promising property would not be eager 
to step down and out. This does not reflect upon old- 
time properties abandoned by pioneer miners, who were 
handicapped by the primitive machinery for mining and 
milling. Rome of the most prosperous properties working 
here to-day are relics of the gold era in California, where 
the miner worked until he reached the water line and then 



July i, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



»3 



was forced to quit, through lack of necessary pumps. But 
of all, there is nothing like taking up new ground. A 
favorable prospect is followed sufficiently to prove its 
value, whether it is worth taking up or not. Should the 
ledge give out, there is an end of it. The loss is cut short 
right there, and no liabilities need attach. The prospect- 
ing plant is in position to be moved to another locality. 
So the work goes on until something is found which will 
justify the expenditure of larger sums of money in sinking 
at depth and in erecting a plant. Most of this property 
can be had upon a working bond, allowing time for a test, 
and involving no responsioility should failure result. It is 
to work upon this safe and highly sensible plan that the 
Occidental Exploration Company is formed. 

Arizona seems to be a rich field for the 
A Paralyzer For men now angling for the small fry in the 
Copper Tru«t. East with money to invest in mining 
stock. On top of the Spenazuma Com- 
pany, which is accredited with some queer doings in its 
methods of stock flotation, comes the Arizona Limited Cop- 
per Mining Company, with a capital of $10,000,000, owner 
of " a hill 225 feet high, which shows 3,500,000 cubic yards 
of rich copper, gold, and silver ores, or about 8,000,000 
tons." What the big experts out here have been doing in 
overlooking a bonanza like this lying close to hand is a 
mystery. A good thing like this is not to be picked up 
every day. The only trouble about the matter is, it is too 
good to be true. 

Following are the transactions on the 
Stock and Bond Stock and Bond Exchange from June 
Quotations. 23d to June 29th inclusive : 

Miscellaneous Bonds. Sales 

Ferries and ClitT House Ry 6% 28,000 <S 117 

Market Street Cable 6% 7.000 @ 129V4 

Con 5", 5,0 ® my, 

S.F &S. J. V.Ry5% 9.UO0@lliH 

So. Paciflo of Arizona 6% 11.00 (5) USM-H* 

So. Paciflo Brancn 6% 14 000 @ 124^-124>< 

S. V W. W. 6% 5,000 O I16M 

U. S.8% 600 @ 108 

U. S. (Coupons, old) 4% 1,100 ® 11354 

STOCKS. 

Water. Shares. Highest. Lowest. . . 

Spring Valley Water 348 101 100K 

Contra Costa Water 705 71% 71)f 

Gas and Electric. 

P.QUltable Gas 350 5% 5 

Mutual Eleotrlo 50 Hii 14* 

Oakland Gas 110 47 47 

Paoitle Gas Improvement 126 72 72 

S. F. Gas and Electric 2.185 74 60J£ 

POWDERS. 

Giant 2,165 73Y, . 70 

Vlgorlt 900 3% S% 

Sugar Stocks. 

HanaP.Co 410 17& 17& 

Hawaiian C & S Co 120 KTOj 98 

Hutchinson S Plantation Co... 491 33 St% 

Onomea PI 150 40H 4 % 

PaaunauSPCo .-. 485 40)4 30« - 

Street Railroads. 

Market Street 547 63 62 

Miscellaneous. 

Alaska Packers Association. ... 31 113 112% 

Oceanic S S Co 175 85H 85 

Pacific Coast Borax Co 16 lSiYt 134% 

London, Paris & American 100 130 130 

Transactions this week amount to 9,441 shares and 80.500 bonds, as 
against 10 690 shares and 147 500 bonds of the previous week. Next 
week the Exchange will be closed lor the regular Fourth of July 
vacation. On the 23d the stock of the Giant Powder Co. was sold 
down to about 70. This weakness was due to the rumor that the 
plant of the U. 8. Smokeless Powder Co. would be rebuilt to include 
the manufacture of dynamite and black powder as well as smoke- 
less powder. The intentions of the D. S. Smokeless Powder Co. are 
not definitely known, but it is believed now that they may rebuild 
in the East, where their largest market is. Gas and Electric weak- 
ened to 69%, chiefly owing to the scarcity of investors. The bonds 
of fie Oakland Transit Co. were listed during the week and are now 
109% bid. This is one of the cheapest, if not the cheapest, 6 per 
cent bond on the list. The indebtedness of the bond, including the 
bonds, amounts to about 17 500 a mile. The assets are about $6,500,- 
000, and the amountof bonds is $1,400 000. 

Ladies do not have to wear switches to cover up their defects if 
they use Smith's Dandruff Pomade in time, it cures dandruff, itch- 
ing scalp, stops falling hair and makes hair grow. Price 50c at all 
druggists. 

For biliousness, constipation, torpid liver, sallow skin, use Baldwin's 
Health Tablets. Ferr y D.ug store, 8 Market street. 

After the oarouse drink Jackson's Napa Soda— then you can go home 
with safety. Catch the idea? 

There are lots of "AA" brands of whisky, but onl^ one Jesse Moore ''AA,' 



Mining Machinery »°« supplies 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 
Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill 
Bartlett Concentrating Table 
James Ore Feeder 
Roger Improved Crushing Rolls 
Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers 
Two and Three Stamp Mills 
Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps 
Wood-Working and Iron- Working Machinery 

PARKE & LACY CO., 21 and 23 Fremont Street, 8. F. 

JOSEPH FIGEL, MERCHANT TAILOR 

2d Floor Flood Building. Entrance Room 5. 

This is an invitation to accurate dressers— men 
who have been paying $50 to $65 for business suits 
— to look over our assortment of fancy cheviots and 
worsteds that we're making np from $30 to $50. 
It's quite an item, isn't it, to save $15 on a suit? 
DepeDd on being properly fitted, on correot styles 

■^~~"~ and on excellent workmanship. 

There's a splendid assortment of trouserings, too. 



FIRST- 
CLASS 
CUSTOM 
TAILORING 
AT 

MODERATE 
COST. 



Hugh a, boyle 

(C. A. Helmqdist, Cutter). 



FINE 



TAILORING 



Room 9 Flood Building 
San Franolsco. 



Bon Marctie 
GlotniQQ Renovatory 

40 Ellis Street, room 1-2. 



SUITS CLEANED 
AND PRESSED 



$1.00 



L. B. NORDLUND 



BROUGHAMS AND COUPES (Rubber Tires.) 






TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE 

Nos. 57-59-61 Minna Street, Between First 
and Second. One block from Palace Hotel. 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, 
Corner Post and Stookton. Tel. Main 153. 
Every vehicle requisite for weddings. Par- 
ties, calling, shopping, business, or Pleas- 
ure. Special orders for four-in-hands. 
Tel. Main 153. 
J. Tomkinson, Prop'r. Established 1803. 



DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



Dentist 



813 Sutter Street, 
Tel. East 629. 



H. ISAAC cJONES, M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Offloe, 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stookton Sts., S. P. 
Hours, 10 A. M. to 4 p. M. Sunday by appointment. Te i. OrmtlOl. 



no r» C nilNNF Of Olympic Club, Chiropodist, at Luoke'a 
Ul\. U. t. UUnilC, shoe Store, 832 Market Street, S. F. 
Hours from 9 A. M. to 12 M.; 1 P. M. to 6 p. M. Ingrowing toe nails a 

spe cialty __^ , 

Johannid 

As a table water is unsurpassed. 

— London Hospital Gazette . 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 




"Hear the Crier?" "What the devil art thou?" 
"One that will play the devil, sir. with you." 

«S. BALDWIN is a prominent and respectable citizen 
of San Francisco. Any man who knows Mr. Baldwin 
will accept his word as the truth. He has just exposed an 
attempt to blackmail him by members of the Fourth of 
July Committee, and the names of JohnM. Chretien and P. 
T. Robinson are mixed up in the scandal. For years it 
has been understood that the funds subscribed by patri- 
otic citizens for the proper celebration of Independence 
Day were largely squandered, and there are hundreds of 
men who do not hesitate to say that these old-time Fourth 
of July Committeemen who always come to the front when- 
ever there is any money to disburse, and as promptly dis- 
appear when it is gone, are not working for nothing. Mr. 
Baldwin says that Chretien approached him with an allega- 
tion that Robinson wanted $50 of his money for arranging 
a fireworks display at Glen Park next Tuesday evening. 
The real estate man declined to be blackmailed. Robinson 
denies that Chretien was commissioned to speak for him. 
Thus the matter stands; but it is suggestive of a class of 
men that handle Fourth of July funds, and whose patriot- 
ism is measured by what is in it for them. 

THIS country is engaged in absorbing foreign territory. 
When we shall have had enough of this, perhaps some 
attention may be given to the protection of American citi- 
zens on foreign soil. In the Bulletin of Wednesday and 
Examiner of Saturday the cases of two citizens — a man of 
Redwood City, this State, and a woman of Texas — are 
reviewed. These persons are in prison where filth, torture, 
ill-health, and ultimate death await them unless help be 
soon extended. They are denied trial, and our Consuls are 
powerless or criminally apathetic. Why not develop a lit- 
tle backbone in protecting this man and woman? We all 
know that human life is hardly as dearly held by the au- 
thorities as a barrel of rotten canned beef, but a little self- 
respect and determination to fill other nations, not wear- 
ing breech-clouts and using gas-pipe canon, with respect 
for the persons of Americans abroad, would be a pleasing 
but highly improbable vision. 

TWELVE jurors were unable to find a verdict of guilty 
against Ex-Collector Welburn, who embezzled money 
and ran away. Of course the case against the prisoner 
is clear enough to satisfy almost every man, woman, and 
child in San Francisco. That he ran away, according to 
eight of the twelve jurors, must be accepted as evidence 
of his innocence— else why should they not promptly con- 
demn him. That a half-score of witnesses swore that the 
charges against him were true serves justice no good 
turn, for the jurors do not believe them. After all, per- 
haps justice will not be defeated, for, if he be acquitted, 
the Ex-Collector stands a good chance of going to the 
Philippines and being potted by some brown-skinned na- 
tivej 

EMMA GOLDMAN, the sexless representative of 
pigmy chaos, now in this city, is one of those small 
creatures that should be taken by the seat of her trousers, 
carried to the Cliff House, and gently dropped overboard! 
Professedly laboring to tear down and destroy, she should 
be taken at her word, accepted as an enemy of society, 
and suppressed. There is such a thing as too much liberty 
of the jaw, and this peripatetic windbag is violently affected 
with it. 

GOVERNOR GAGE has fled to Catalina Island, thirty 
miles off the coast of Southern California, where he 
will spend the Fourth of July. There will always remain a 
doubt in the public mind whether his Excellency fled to 
escape the ubiquitous and insistent firecracker, or the 
hungry and persistent office-seeker. In either case his 
patriotism cannot be consistently questioned. 



TWO lawyers and two police sergeants quarreled over 
the filthy coin which a Court decided had been earned 
by the attorneys in saving a murderer's hide. The male- 
factor, distrusting banks, had buried his treasure in the 
earth, whence it had been disinterred and lodged with 
Chief Lees, until the latter's grip had been reluctantly re- 
leased by a peremptory order of Court. When the coin 
was counted the lawyers say the policemen demanded a 
rake-off for having steered the old man who did the mur- 
der to their eager net. This is strenuously denied by the 
guardians of the peace. Honors are easy. Evidently the 
coin was not the only filthy quantity in the combination. 

CHIEF SULLIVAN says that he has unbounded confi- 
dence in the men who, in buying supplies for the Fire 
Department, are proved to have paid from two to five 
times as much for them as is charged in the open market. 
There is no eoubt that the firms who sell the goods would 
heartily endorse the chief's certificate of character. Bald 
assertion and gushing expressions of belief in the integrity of 
men may be easily accumulated in San Francisco or else- 
where. We may admire the devotion of the chief to his 
subordinates, but we must damn his judgment as an ex- 
pensive and unnecessary luxury. 

\TO free press, no free speech!" shrieks the Exam 
1\ iner with black type half an inch' tall, in describing 
the situation at Wardner, Idaho. Half a foot down the 
column beneath, the special reporter sent to Wardner to 
tell the facts, and doubtless doing so, says: "A mild cen- 
sorship was ordered at Wardner a few weeks ago and 
maintained for a few days, but it was ridiculous at best." 
Were Ananias in this city and out of a job, his qualifica- 
tions would not be sufficient to secure for him a situation 
as telegraph editor of this yellow sheet. 

PUGILIST Jeff ries earned $62,000 in the ten days follow- 
ing the annihilation of the Australian's reputation; and 
President McKinley, by workiog overtime, earns $50,000 in 
twelve months. Evidently this is the age of brawn rather 
than of brain. The creature with the hoe beats out, in a 
financial way, the student with the book. To be able to 
knock off an adversary's head expeditiously is to-day the 
royal road to riches. 

SN imaginative minister of this city regaled his large 
congregation, last Sunday, with a discourse upon the 
subject, " If Christ came to San Francisco." He should 
be more practical. Theories are of small service in this 
work-a-day world. Christ has no intention of coming to 
San Francisco: and his satanic majesty is already on the 
ground. 

THE Police Court attorney who denies that his face 
was slapped by an enraged bailiff, and that he was 
thrown out by that court official, impeaches thereby the 
ability of that minion to properly discharge the functions 
of his lowly but necessary place in the judicial machine. 

NEVADA City was, three days ago, the scene of a cow- 
ardly attempt at assassination. Evidently the send- 
ing of murderer Moore to the penitentiary when he should 
have gone to the gallows, is bearing fruit in the congenial 
soil of Nevada City — as elsewhere. 

IN the long list of new appointees by the Health Board 
are several disinterment inspectors, but no mention ap- 
pears of disinfecting inspectors, and really a considera- 
ble number of such could be profitably emploved about the 
City Hall. " 

DR. WACHENDORF declared sympathetically that he 
would tke his patient, one Kehlenbeck away to a quiet 
place. Behold, the Doctor is a prophet, for Kehlenbeck 
is now on a slab at the Morgue. The Doctor's diagnosis is 
a tribute to his medical training. 

GH. RYAN, J. J. Sullivan, and J. Murray have been 
, appointed food inspectors, vice Fogarty, McGinty, 
and Flannagan. Great God I Where is the shade of 
Frank Pixley ? 

NOT a shadow of doubt will be entertained as to the 
successful outcome of the proposed minstrel perform- 
ance by Native Sons. It is beyond denial that the scions 
of California's pioneer stock are "corkers" from post to 
finish. 



July i, 1899 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER. 



»5 



One of California 's Sreatest Sources of Wealth 



CALIFORNIA is rapidly adding another wealth pro- 
ducer to the long list already in active operation. To 
her fruits, grain, fish, wine, lumber, stock and gold must 
be added the production of oil. The development in this 
direction has, within a recent time, assumed an impor- 
tance which abundantly justifies the belief that there lie 
beneath the soil in different sections of the State immense 
bodies of petroleum, of great practical value. In South- 
ern California, for many years native petroleum has been 
a commercial fact; but only of recent years have efforts 
been made to locate oil fields north of Tehachapi. The 
time and money expended and the accomplished results 
guarantee a brilliant future for this undeveloped industry 
in Central California. 

Oil City is a little hamlet situated on the barren south- 
eastern foothills of the San Joaquin Valley, in Fresno 
county, which scarcely six months ago had a place on the 
map, and was unknown to more than two or three hun- 
dred people. By the opening of the year 1900 it will be 



There is no reason, say those whose opinions are worth 
having, why they should not be of more frequent occur- 
rence in the Fresno county oil territory. When the mea- 
gre developments at Oil City are measured by the results 
obtained, no man can limit the great wealth which lies 
beneath these barren San Joaquin foothills and valleys, 
and which is certain to be made tributary to the wealth of 
the State. 

Speaking of the future of the Coalinga region Mr. C. N. 
Hall, a Pennsylvania expert with thirty years of practical 
experience behind his back, says: " Nowhere in America 
have indications of oil been so generally distributed as 
throughout the State of California, and, after a thorough 
study, I have come to the belief that a large part of the 
west half of the State, from the Sierras to the ocean, is 
underlaid with oil." Mr. Hall has made a critical exam- 
ination af the new territory, and, in concluding a review 
of the geological formation and indications in that section, 
declares: " I believe in the field fully, and expect to see 








General View of Oil Fields .adjacent to Oil City, Coalinga District. 



recognized by tens of thousands, for Oil City is doubtless 
destined to be the centre of a large production of fuel oil, 
which will not only make fortunes for the lucky investors, 
but add millions of permanent wealth to the State. The 
attention of men of unlimited means has been drawn to the 
Fresno oil territory, experts of lifelong experience and 
unquestioned integrity have gone carefully over the fields, 
and disinterested opinions from all worthy sources unite 
in declaring the new district to be a true oil belt, from 
which millions upon millions of barrels of oil will be taken. 
Not only is expert testimony a unit upon this point, but 
the actual output of petroleum has proved the fields to be 
exceedingly rich. Men who went to that section one year 
ago are to-day wealthy; and stocks which were difficult to 
sell last January at $40 are worth $3,000, and hard to get. 
The temporary investment by one man of $1,200, within a 
year has netted him $75,000 on dividends and $100,000 for 
his interest. To those familiar with the great oil produc- 
ing fields of Pennsylvania these transactions do not ap- 
pear strange, for they have been frequent in that section. 



wells of 10,000 barrels per day capacity drilled in the 
Coalinga fields; this I write as a frank and honest state- 
ment of my opinion of the Fresno county field, and espe- 
cially of Coalinga and vicinity." 

There have been many companies organized for the de- 
velopment of these fields, and some of them are purely 
speculative. Their promoters expect to make fortunes at 
the expense of the people, and without expending a dollar 
of their own money. Companies which are organized to do 
a legitimate business — who have paid for oil lands and are 
developing their properties, will court investigation. 
There are some wildcats, but the legitimate and honest 
investors are to be easily distinguished. Those enumer- 
ated in the following pages may be relied upon as repre- 
senting actual values and upright methods. 

In the following pages no attempt is made to burrow 
deeply into the causes, but the effort has been rather to set 
forth what is being done in this field, the reasons for the 
developments now going on, and the undoubted wealth 
which exists there. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 



FRE5N0, METROPOLIS OF SAN JOAQUIM VALLEY 



Fresno county is deeply interested in the new oil belt 
which lies in a southwesterly direction distant about fifty 
miles. The rich region lies on the west side of the San 
Joaquin Valley, and in the edge of the Coast Range of 
Mountains. Fresno, the metropolis of the valley, has in- 
vested a good deal of money in the new fields, its hustling 
business men have organized a number of companies, and 
the city will very greatly profit by the development of 
that territory. The Fresno Republican says: "There can 
be no question that this is the coming industry in Fresno 
county. The people have not fully realized the import- 
ance of the oil development, and if the business element 
of Fresno know what is good for them they will try to 



afford an opportunity for profitable investment by persons 
of small means, who, in buying the stock, are secure from 
being assessed out, and their holdings have the advantage 
of the most expert examination of lands represented by 
the stock they hold. 

From the location of the company's lands it is twelve 
miles to the head of navigation. A pipe line will be run 
to the head of navigation from the wells, and the product 
shipped by water to this city and towns about the pay, 
thus rendering the company independent of all railroads. 
They are also the fortunate discoverers of a copper mine, 
a tunnel some forty feet in length having been run, open- 
ing up a splendid copper ledge two and a half feet in width. 




Court Bouse, Fresno, Cal. 

work for this trade, since the new train service, leaving 
Fresno in the morning and arriving at Coalinga at noon, 
places the Fresno merchant as near to the Coalinga 
trade as the Hanford merchant, and that Hanford has 
profited by it every citizen in the town can testify." 

The Union Consolidated Oil and Transportation Com- 
pany is composed strictly of local capital and by local par- 
ties. The offices of the company are in the Parrott build- 
ing, room 323. This company has had for the past four 
months and a half a party of oil experts and surveyors in- 
vestigating the oil regions of California, and at last has 
succeeded in locating lands in Township 10 South of Range 
10 and 11 East, Fresno county, and is the owner of 2400 
acres of oil-bearing lands, which have been carefully tested 
and declared to be of great value. 

This company is in no sense a close corporation, and is 
not composed of wealthy men. It has been determined to 



The company's method of operation is as follows : Two 
hundred thousand dollars of the capital stock is set aside 
as treasury stock, the entire proceeds of which is to be 
used in developing the property. While this stock is on 
the market, no private holdings will be sold at any price. 
The gentlemen composing the company are enthusiastic 
oil men, and invite the fullest investigation of their methods. 

Among those who took prompt advantage of the oil 
boom in Fresno may be mentioned Mr. W. N. Rohrer, who, 
realizing the immense importance of the oil industry, sent 
a surveying party out to the oil belt before the general 
stampede, and succeeded in locating 1700 acres of oil ter- 
ritory, which has since become very valuable. Mr. Roh- 
rer and his associates deeded their claims to the Western 
Oil Co. , a close corporation, having no stock for sale. 

Mr. Rohrer is also President of the Mt. GoddardOilCo.. 
which has leased half the holdings of the Western, and w 



July i, 1899. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTRR , 7 



tlramt Central Hotel. Fresno. 

proceed at once to bore a well on tbeir lease only two 
miles from the famous spouters at Oil City. A limited 
portion of Mt. Goddard stock will be disposed of for devel- 
opment purposes only. 

While Mr. Rohrerhas made a specialty of real estate, 
he has been giving much of his time of late to oil interests, 
and is probably one of the best posted men in the district 
in regard to the present situation. The Directors of the 
Mt. Goddard Oil Co. are among the best and most conser- 
vative business men of Fresno, being F. K. Prescott, C. H. 
Murdock, A. B. Smith. M. K. Harris, B. F. Shepherd, C. 
S. Pierce, and W. N. Rohrer. 

Helm & Helm, dealers in real estate, who have a large 
list of the finest improved and unimproved properties in 
the city and lands throughout the county, have turned 
their attention to the rich oil fields, and are handling very 
successfully properties and stocks in the petroleum terri- 
tory. They may be consulted either by correspondence or 
in person, and may be accepted as excellent authority 
on values. Those who are best informed show their belief 
that this discovery will be, at an early day, quite as 
strong a drawing card as the Alaska gold discoveries; and 
that petroleum, instead of ranking third on the list of min- 
eral products, will take front place. Helm & Helm's of- 
fice is 1842 Mariposa street, Fresno. 

The name of S. N. Griffith has been identified with some 
of the largest enterprises of the San Joaquin Valley, and, 
in matters of public policy in local affairs, his judgment is 
always accepted as safe and sound. Mr. Griffith and his 
partner, Mr. W. H. McKenzie, own one of the hand- 
somest business blocks in Fresno, and compose one of the 
leading real estate firms of the city. Within the past 
thirty days Mr. Griffith has floated a big company for the 
development of oil interests in the county. 
1 Among many others who are prominently identified with 
the important material interests Eot only of Fresno itself, 













Tl?e- 



parmers' r/latior^al 

BaQ^ °f Fresno . . . 



Hours: 
lo a, m. to 3 p. m. 



Paid-Up Capital 

$150,000.00 



A. KUTNBK, President. 

ALEX GOLDSTEIN, Vice-P.esident and Manager. 

WALTER SHOEMAKER, Cashier. 

JOSEPH M. SMITH, Assistant Cashier. 



Transacts a General Banking Business. 
Buys and sells exchange on all the principal 
cities of the United States and Europe, 
Solicits the accounts of Corporations, firms, 
and individuals. 

Has absolutely fire and burglar-proof safe de- 
posit vault. Safety deposit boxes for rent at 
nominal figures. 



California Oil 
Stock . , . 
ExGliaiiQe . . 




All Stocks Listed on Exchange, 

Quotations Furnished upon Application, 

Correspondence Solicited. 



Smith Bros. Drug Co., Fresno. Col. 



B. F. SHEPHERD Freslrent. 

J. S. HERMANN Treasurer. 

GttftS. TEftGUE Secretary. 

Room 500, Safe Deposit Building, S. F., and 
1123 J Street, Fresno, Cal. 



IS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July i, 1899. 







IMS 



Train of Oil Tank Cars, End of Pipe Line, One Mile from Coalinga, Fresno, Cal. 



but iD pushing the development of the tributary oil fields, 
may be mentioned Alexander Goldstein, vice-President 
and Manager of the Farmers National Bank of Fresno; 
Mr. L. L. Cory, a prominent attorney, and Mr A. B. Smith. 

All oil stocks are listed by the Coalinga Oil Stock Ex- 
change, Fresno, of which B. F. Shepherd is President; J. 
S. Hermann, Treasurer; and Chas. Teague, Secretary. 
Quotations are furnished and correspondence solicited. 

Fresno has several hotels, of which the leading hostelry 
is the Grand Central Hotel, which is thoroughly furnished 
throughout. The Grand Central is convenient to all 
trains, and caters for the best class of trade both perma- 
nent and transient. All the modern improvements are 



found there, and the tables are always supplied with a 
great variety and abundance of the best in the markets. 






The Tubbs Cordage Company of this city manufacture 
four different kinds of rope that are of especial value in 
the work of developing oil wells — the sand line, bull rope, 
cable and hawser-laid. The last-named is in reality three 
separate ropes twisted into one, the result of which is to 
impart an extra spring to the drill. It will be found of 
great value in the work of sinking. All the Tubbs cordage 
rope is made of the carefully selected manila stock directly 
imported by the company. 




Oil Weil Capped, Coalinga District, Tre»*o_Co.,Cal. 



FUwing Oil Well, Oil City, Fresno Co., Cal. 



July I, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«9 



COALINGA FIELDS. RICH A5 PENNSYLVANIA 




tion wherein steam and heat are factors. California 
fields will play a tremendous part in the immediate future 
development of Industrial interests. 

The increase in output at the Coalinga fields has been 
steady. For the month of April, 25,266 barrels of oil were 
shipped from the wells on section 20. In the following month 
the shipment increased to 35,000 barrels. In the month 
of June just, closed, the record shows 60,000 barrels. At 
present the actual capacity of the Coalinga fields is between 
iio.Diio and 100,000 barrels, but there is a lack of transpor- 
tation facilities, and some of the wells are capped. There 
are 16 producing oil wells in that district, which is today 
yielding a larger product than the entire remainder of the 
State. 

The Coalinga Oil Company has closed contracts, to go 
into effect October 1, for the delivery of 110,000 barrels 
monthly. Chanslor &■ Canfield are the Coalinga Company, 
and they are also heavily interested in every company in 
section 20 except the Mutual. It may be added that this 
firm has given a great deal of attention to the placing of 
their product on the market, and are succeeding grandly. 
Mr. Chanslor devotes his entire time in demonstrating to 
consumers the value of oil as a fuel, acd the consumption 
of petroleum is rapidly increasing as its merits . are being 
more generally understood. 

Among some of the heavy consumers who formerly em. 



One of Chanslor & Canfield's Rigs, Oil Gity, Fresno Co., Cal. 

One of the most serious drawbacks — in fact the only one 
— to the manufacturing interests of California has been the 
absence of cheap fuel. Climaticconditions are favorable to 
the economical employment of men and machinery and the 
successful prosecution of manufacturing interests in this 
State. There is neither ice nor snow in winter, nor pros- 
trating heat in summer. Woods, metals and other mate- 
rials native to the coast are to be had in abundance. Tem- 
perate climate all the year round more than offset the 
difference in wages paid to skilled labor here and at the 
East; the long freight haul must act as an effective pro- 
tective tariff. The vast trade of China, Japan— the entire 
Orient — is moving toward the Coast of California. 

The question of fuel must solve this problem, and the oil 
fields of this State must provide the solution. Those who 
have studied the oil territory of California, and men who 
are spending their money in investigating and developing 
these oil discoveries, are positive that immense quantities 
of petroleum are locked in the bowels of the earth. The 
industry has been demonstrated. Thousands of barrels of 
oil are being produced daily and consumed by the locomo- 
tives and stationary engines of the State. The fields that 
have been developed are but the beginning. The activity 
of capital and the energy of men who are interested in oil 
at this time mean without possible doubt that the era of 
cheap fuel, for which the State has long sought, is at hand. 
This will be of inestimable worth to California. Eastern 
manufacturers and millions of capital which are lying 
idle must be attracted to the State, and manufactur- 
ing interests receive an unthought-of impetus. Only sec- 
ond to the discovery of gold (if indeed can any exception 
be made), may be held the discovery and production of fuel 
oil. It will mean a revolution in every branch of produc- 




The Famous "Blue Goose" Well, 800 bbls. oil per day. Property of 
Home Oil Co., Oil vity; Fresno Co., Cal. 



ao 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 




New York Syndicate Big. Coalinga District, Fresno Co., Cat. 

ploved coal for fuel but now use oil, are the Western Sugar 
Refining Company, the Judion Manufacturing Company, 
National Ice Company, Steiger Terra Cotta and Pressed 
Brick Works, Western Meat Company, San Francisco 
Electric Company, Pacific Gas Improvement Company, 
Equitable Gas Company, Oakland Gaslight and Heat Com- 
pany, Gladding, McBean & Co., and Central Light Com- 
pany, all of this city and Oakland; Los Angeles Lighting 
Company, Puente Oil Refinery, Los Angeles Oil Refining 
Company, Ventura Oil Refining Company, and the South- 
ern Pacific, Santa Pe and the Valley Railroads are all 
changing from coal fuel to oil. 

Colonel Charles Sonntag, realizing the necessity of 
cheaper fuel for the manufacturing industries of the State, 
has for some time taken a great interest in the produc- 
tion of oil in California. With this object in view, the Col- 
onel visited Los Angeles in 1895, looked over the field, en- 
tered into certain relations with the producers, and re- 
turned to this city, where he labored to introduce the 
crude product from the south into the factories and mills 
operating here. He was very successful in his efforts, 
and as a result, in many cases, coal was discarded and 
crude oil took its place. Col. Sonntag went into Contra 
Costa county, investigated and interested local capital. 
Wells are now being sunk, and excellent results are being 
obtained. He returned a short time ago from an extended 
trip through the Coalinga fields, and declares that the de- 
velopments there far exceed all his expectations. He an- 
ticipates the day will soon be here when the output of oil 
will exceed in value either gold or silver. The Colonel 
thinks the only danger lies in putting too high a figure on 
oil-bearing lands, and thus scaring investors off. Capital 
is just now taking a deep interest in oil, and with reasona- 
ble encouragement large sums of money will be put into 
the developing of this great industry. 

Within the district named, up to the present date, 
Fresno county has been the scene of the greatest activity. 



The Coalinga Oil fields are at Oil City, distant from Coal- 
inga about ten miles north, and the entire oi 1 belt is per- 
haps forty miles in length by half a mile wide. 

As early as 1892 Roland and Lacy of Los Angeles vis- 
i'"'l that district and prospected those fields. They obtained 
a little oil — from 5 to 40 barrels daily — but determined that 
the results would not justify further effort, and gave up 
the enterprise. The next attention paid to the oil fields 
of Fresno county was by Captain Frank Barrett, in 1895, 
who, in speaking of subsequent development, says : 

"When I first 
went there the only 
inhabitants were 
coyotes. The first 
night I slept on the 
ground with the 
buggy cushions 
against the wheels 
of tae wagon, to 
keep the wind off. 
A small frying pan, 
equally small coffee- 
pot, a little piece of 
bacon and a few 
crackers comprised 
the commissary 
stores. Sage brush 
was the fuel, and it 
was very scarce. It 
was the mostdreary, 
desolate, God-for- 
saken looking region 
that the eye of man 
ever rested on; could 
be fitly compared to 
the Dacotah Bad 
Lands. And yet, 
from my observations of the field, I became convinced of 
the value of the lands for oil, sufficiently so to commence 




Capl. Frank Barrett. 



July i, 1899. 



SAN 1 R AXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



immediate developments, and I am glad to gee that my 
predictions have come true; and I feel proud of the fact 
that all the big wells are on territory located by me and 
by companies organized by me. It is true that "tin 
inga Oil Company developed their big wells on the W. i of 
20, but they are on property located and first developed by 
me." 

June 1, 18!>t> i^he commenced work in October, 
Barrett bad drilled two good producing wells, one yielding 
ubout twenty-five barrels and the other from fifty to sixty 
barrels daily. The three C's had also drilled a couple of 
«ells, but they were not as good wells as Producers' and 
C msumers', the company that Captain Barrett had or- 
ganized and of which he was President. In August. 
1 he Secretary of the Interior made his famous ruling, or 
rather infamous ruling, declaring that petroleum lands 
were not mineral lands, and could not be located as such, 
and the Producers' and Consumers' lost all their holdings, 
save the northwest quarter of section 20, on which the 
wells were located. It embarrassed the company to such 
an extent that they leased the northwest quarter to 
Chanslor, Canfield and Hayward for a term of ten years. 

The lessees incorporated the Coalinga Oil Company, and 
have made large developments under the management of 
C. A. Canfield, and now have a daily output of about 1500 
barrels. There was, however, at the time the Producers' 
and Consumers' Company made the lease, a very serious 
drawback to the field. During the fall and winter of 1896-7, 
the heavy rains in the foothills destroyed the roads as fast as 
they were made; feed for horses was scarce and very high. 
The oil had to be hauled to the railroad in tank wagons, 
and it was costing 50 cents a barrel to do it. Captain 
Barrett organized a company and put in a pipe line, guar- 
anteeing to carry the oil for four years, the first year at 
15 cents a barrel and for the three following years at 10 
cents per barrel. 

The Home Oil Company is the third producing company 
in the field. Captain Barrett secured a lease of the north- 
east quarter of section 20, and organized the Home Oil 
Company with Selma people — C. U. Kilbourn, G. W. Ter- 
rill, Walter Scott and I. V. Poston. Captain Barrett was 
elected manager, which position he resigned shortly after- 
ward, and was succeeded by Judge Poston. President Ter- 
rill, of the Home Oil Company says that Captain Barrett re- 
signed as manager of that company against the protest of 
every stockholder, but his pipe line, coupled with the fact 
that he had formed an alliance with the Union Oil Com- 
pany of California, operating in San Benito county, occu- 
pied his entire time. Judge Poston succeeded Captain 
Barrett as manager of the Home Company, which posi- 
tion he held until January 1, 1899, when, having disposed 
of all his interest, coupled with the fact that he wanted a 
rest, be resigned. This company was organized with a 
capital stock of $100,000— one hundred shares of $1000 
each. This stock has recently sold at $2250 per share, 
and cannot now be bought for $3000. They have a pro- 
duction of about 800 barrels a day. 

At the present time the production of the Coalinga dis- 
trict is about 90,000 barrels a month. The capacity of 
the wells runs all the way from 75 to 800 barrels a day. 

The Avenal Land and Oil Company expects to begin 
operations just as soon as the necessary machinery can 
be procured. The holdings of the company are large, and 
comprise some of the finest grazing lands in Kern county. 
A. B. Williamson is President of the company, and the 
Board of Directors are : T. Binny, J. A. Hooper, J. E. 
Rawlins, J. S. Robertson and C. A. Canfield. 

The Kreyenhagen district is located about twenty miles 
east from the Coalinga fields, and is in Fresno County. It 
is one of the Yecent discoveries, and all indications point to 
a bright future for it. There are at present two flow- 
ing wells in this district; but they are capped, owing to 
the absence of transportation. This will be effected soon 
by the construction of a pipe line either to Coalinga or 
Hanford. , , 

The St. Lawrence Oil and Mineral Company is the largest 
corporation operating in this field. The company has capi- 
tal stock of $50,000, in 5,000 shares of the par value of $10. 
It may be incidentally observed that the stock is now sell- 
ing at $15 per share, and difficult to get. One thousand 
shares were sold for $10,000 to furnish the working capital, 



and 1,200 shares were retained as treasury stock to meet 
any possible deficiency which might be made before the 
property became a paying investment, and so secure all 
>ue from assessment for development purposes. Th 1 " 
stock is to be distributed ]>m r<it<i among the stockholders 
as soon as the wells are flowing. There is great an 
and double shifts, day and night, will soon be working on 
the property of the St. Lawrence Oil and Mineral Com- 
pany. 

Its officers are : A. B. Smith, president; Fred Foster, 
vice-president; J. L. Hickman, treasurer; F. H. Pryor, 
secretary. Directors : Fred Foster, W. L. Jackson, E 
Skinner, A. B. Smith, V. H. Pryor, and J. Vinning. 

The company owns 160 acres of oil land, which lies in 
section 12, tp 23, R 16 E., and also Jth section of Govern- 
ment patented land near by. The property is abundantly 
supplied with wood and water, which are important ele- 
ments. The oil in small quantities thus far found is of ex- 
cellent quality, is of a very light color, and of specific 
gravity, 14 Beaume. 



U/. |i I^otyrer, 

Oil Lands Bought and Sold. 
Dealer in Stocks, Securities, 
Real Estate and Insurance. 
Correspondence solicited. 

1047 J Street, prc^spo, Qal. 

Reference : Fresno National Bank. 



Smith's Dandruil Pomade . . 

CURES 



DANDRUFF 
ECZEMA 
ITCHINU SCALP 



AND ALL SCALP AND SKIN DIJ-EASE:. 

FRIGE 50 GENTS 

AT ALL DRliaaiSTS 




FREE SAMPLE 

Mailed to those who wish to test its merits upon 
return of this circular, with your address, to 



SMITH BROS.. Fresno. Gal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 



HANFORD, COUNTY 5EAT OF KING5. 




Water Work*, Hanford, King's Co., Cal. Rawlins A- Robertson, / 

The development of these oil fields in Fresno county have 
been of great direct benefit to the towns of the San Joa- 
quin Valley. Large quantities of supplies are being con- 
sumed, and the pay-rolls aggregate an important sum. 

The town of Hanford displays an energy which larger 
places might emulate with profit. Hanford is the county 
seat of Kern county, and is the centre of a fine agricul- 
tural country — a prosperous and pushing place of about 
4000 inhabitants. It is 60 miles distant from the oil fields, 
and taps them by means of a spur from the Southern Pa- 
cific which reaches Coalinga, to which a pipe line extends 
from Oil City. 

Among the most progressive and valuable citizens of 
Hanford are Messrs. Rawlins & Robertson, of the Bank of 
Hanford, owners of the city water-works, and several of 
the best blocks in the town. J. A. Rawlins is President 
and Mr. Robertson a Director of the bank. These gentle- 
men are interested with 6. W. McNear and Chanslor & Can- 
field and other men in 23,000 acres of oil lands; and they are 
also stockholders in the Phoenix, Home and Blue Goose 
Oil Companies. They also own large ranches in the imme- 
diate vicinity of Hanford. They have great faith in the 
future of the oil fields, and anticipate that the product of 
the region will solve the question of fuel, enabling manu- 
facturers of California to compete with the East, and thus 
build up local industries. They think Hanford should be 
the point of distribution for the oil fields, and are losing 
no opportunity to accomplish that result. 

Duncan R. Cameron, a dealer in real estate and inter- 
ested in fruit packing, is accurately posted on the qualities 
of lands in the oil district of King and Fresno counties. 
He buys and sells oil lands on commission, and gladly fur- 
nishes valuable information free to inquirers. Mr. Came- 
ron's office is in the Hotel Artesia block. 

One of the leading attorneys of Hanford is Horace L. 
Smith, from Mississippi. He was educated in the South, 
served in the Confederate Army from 1860 to 1865, a mem- 
ber of Company F, Thirtieth Mississippi. He came to Cali- 
fornia in 1885, and practiced before the Eureka Bar, re- 



moving to Hanford in 1893. Mr. Smith has made an espe- 
cial study of land law, and has been retained in the most 
important land litigation of that section. He is an excel- 
lent speaker, and in 1896 delivered a most effective memo- 
rial address before the United Union and Confederate sol- 
diers of Kern county. 

Hotel Artesia is so named because in the court of the 
hotel is an artesian well and fountain. The water comes 
from a depth of 1600 fest and is fine, cold and wholesome. 
The hotel is first-class, and modern in its appoint- 
ments. Special attention is given to transient guests 
and traveling men. The telegraph and railroad offices 
are all in the building. The proprietor of the Hotel' Arte- 
sia is B- J. Turaer, who conducts his house upon the most 
liberal principles. 



Thomson & Bouie go., 

flanufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL 
OR IRON . . . 




WATER PIPE, 
OIL TANK3 

304 to 314 Requena 5t., Los Angeles, Cal. 



July I, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



*3 



Robertson & Sharpies, capitalists, who own large 
interests in Hanford, are completing a large department 
store, 150 front by 100 feet deep, two stones in height. 
The upper floor will be devoted to lodge rooms and offices. 
and the first floor for stores, etc. The location is quite 
central, and immediately opposite the Opera House. Ho- 
tel Veodome, a handsome brick structure, has just been 
completed by Mr. Sharpies, and is now prepared to receive 
guests. The hotel is light, roomy and constructed in a 
thoroughly modern, up-to-date manner. 

Joseph D. Biddle, whose offices are in the Hotel Artesia, 
real estate and insurance agent, is thoroughly conversant 
with the oil fields and the different most promising sec- 
tions. Mr. Biddle is interested in several oil deals, and 
within the past month has floated one of the largest cor- 
porations now operating in the field, several of the stock 
holders being heavy capitalists of San Francisco. 

Hermann Nathan, of Nathan Brothers, is Vice-Presi- 
dent of the California Raisin Growers' Association, and is 
at present acting President, owing to the absence of N. 
Theo. Kearney in Europe. Mr. Nathan has been inter- 
ested in Hanford and in the raisin and fruit business of 
Kern and Fresno counties for the past 25 years. He is at 





The Sharpie* Building Hanford, King's Co..i'al 

present largely interested in oil, and is a director in the 
original Kreyenhagen Oil Company. 



SELMA, FRESNO GOUNTY. 

The town of Selma, 
Fresno county, has its 
representatives in the 
oil regions — has several 
companies actively at 
work — and is showing a 
keen appreciation of thn 
possibilities of the new 
fiejds. Chief among its 
citizens thus interested 
is Capt. J. A. McClung, 
Sr., who was President 
of the Producers' and 
Consumers' Oil Com- 
pany, the company 
which drilled the first 
gusher in the now cele- 
brated oil fields of 

Coalinga The Captain c tnlH _,, A _ Mca . ung , 

is now President and 

General Manager of the Selma Oil Co., and General 
Manager of the Mutual Oil Company; he is also President 
and General Manager of the Sunnyside Oil Company. These 
companies are actively engaged in developing the field. 
The Selma well, a picture of which is shown in this num- 
ber, is the deepest well yet drilled in the field. The upper 
stratas of oil and gas have been penetrated in this well, 
and they expect to drill into the pay streak in a few days. 
The men shown in the picture are the men behind the guns, 
upon whose skill depends the success of the enterprise. It 
will be interesting to the reader to know that there is in 
the Selma Company's well over a mile of casing, in four 
sizes, running from llf to 51, which, at the present price 
of casing, would cost $7,000. This well is now nearing 
1700 feet in depth, and the 7| casing is down almost 1600 
feet. 




f\e\n\ 9 Jtelm, 



Geo- I Helm 
F- M- Helm 
Tel. Red 11. 



Oil Well, Oil City, Fresno Co., Cat., 660 bbls. per day. 



REAL ESTATE AND MONEY LOANING AGENCY. 
Special attention given to exchange of property. 
Rents Collected. A large list of fine Improved and Un- 
improved properties in City and County. Notary 
Public, Insurance. Oil stock bought and sold on 
Commission. 

Offiee: 1842 /I\arip08a St., prespo, <?al. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 



BAKER5FIELD, SUMMERLAMD, AND PARKFIELD. 




Rotunda; Hotel Artesia, Hanford, King's Co., Cat. 

A discovery ot unusual importance was made at 
Means' Ranch, 'about four miles northeast of Bakers 
field, during the last week of May, 1899. 

Having noticed a film of oil at this place on Kern river, 
some miners, temporarily out of employment, sank a fifty- 
foot hole on a bluff not twenty yards away from the stream. 
Then a two-inch augur was used, and twenty-five feet 
deeper oil of excellent quality was discovered in small 
quantity. 

The oil sands here are apparently very rich. From this 
shallow hole exudes about a barrel a day. As a result of 
this discovery, all available lands along Kern river have 
been located. Several San Franciscans are among the 
holders. 

The stratification coinciding with that at the point of 
discovery, more wells are to be bored further up Kern 
river. At Barker's Sulphur Spring Ranch, about four 
miles from Means' and less than eight miles fram Bakers- 
field, natural gas of excellent illuminating character, has 
for years past been used from a sulphur spring. 

A five-foot deep augur hole just bored at another place 
on the ranch at once filled with sulphur water and natural 
gas. The water is impregnated with salt and other indi- 
cations dear to the prospector for oil are present. 

The place has been leased by Maurice V. Samuels of San 
Francisco, and machinery will be immediately put into 
operation on the property. 

No deep hole is to be sunk for the present, but a num- 
ber of shallow borings, intended to reveal the formation 
first below the surface, will be made so that certain theo- 
ries can be tested. 

An experimental well will then be sunk upon the lands 
of the San Joaquin Valley Gypsum and Land Company, 
immediately across Kern river from Barker's Ranch. 

Six miles beyond, upon Kern river, is the power-house 
of the Kern County Electrical Company. Here twelve 
thousand horse power is developed from the fall of the 
river where it enters from the canon. Hot sulphur water and 
natural gas again show at this point. This suggests a 
stretch of the gas belt, if not the oil belt as well, over ten 
miles along the river. 

Oil at Kern river could be handled by competing railroads. 
Cheap fuel secured, Bakersfield has a good chance to be a 
large manufacturing center. Natural gas would prove of 
inestimable value for heating purposes, since the use of 
coal in so warm a climate as that city enjoys must result 
in overheating of houses and great discomfort in conse- 
quence. 

The oil found is apparently heavier than that of Coal- 
ing a, but it is, of course, from near the surface. Cer- 
tain well-known tertiary fossils are found at both Coalinga 
and Kern river. The region is of rare interest to the geol- 
ogist, and is fully described by Mr. Watts in Bulletin num- 
ber three of the State Mining Bureau. 



PARKRELD. 

Parkfield is in Monterey County, and has been attract- 
ing a good deal of attention lately. In order to meet 
the many inquiries which have been made at this office by 
mail and otherwise, a representative of the News Letter 
was sent down there and instructed to report nothing 
but the facts. The News Letter is a conservative jour- 
nal. It does not believe in encouraging investments in oil 
lands, gold mines, or any other speculative ventures unless 
there is fact and foundation for it; so whatever appears in 
this Oil Number may be accepted as well within the truth. 

At Parkfield, the representative of the News Letter 
met Captain Barrett, who is the president and general 
manager of the Parkfield Oil Company, who turned him 
over to the field manager, W. H. Hennage. Captain Bar- 
rett declared that be desired no boom, that he had the en- 
tire belt corraled, and knew what the territory contained. 
Barrett was the founder of the Coalinga field and Hen- 
nage the first driller, and has been with the Captain four 
years. There are two rigs in active operation at Park- 
field, and a third is erected with machinery and casings 
on the ground, and a water line under construction. An 
examination of the oil sand cropping out within two feet 
of the surface of the ground, is quite as strongly impreg- 
nated with the scent of oil as an empty oil-barrel. A visit 
to the gulches was made and several natural seepages were 
seen. An excavation had been made near by to catch 
the trend of the rock, and there was seen oil dripping 
down through the shale. 

Water, a most necessary quantity in developing oil prop- 
erties, is abundant at Parkfield. The supply is not half 
developed, but an inch pipe was discharging its full capac- 
ity, with but half the supply turned on, and the manager 
said there was abundant water in sight to run ten rigs 
twenty-four hours every day. Of timber for all possible 
uses there is a fine supply. 

The writer met at Parkfield, a Mr. Whittier, of the 
Green & Whittier Oil Company. Los Angeles and Coalinga, 
who expressed himself in no uncertain terms as to the 
richness and value of Captain Barrett's field. He declared 
that the belt was typical of the Pennsylvania oil fields. 

The Parkfield territory can be made tributary to the 
railroad at Bradley with a pipe line 18 miles in length, or 
tidewater at a distance of 45 miles. One pumping sta- 
tion would be required right at the scene of operations, 
and then the oil would naturally gravitate to the railroad. 
The same conditions would prevail in piping to the coast. 
It is well worth a trip to Parkfield to see the develop- 
ments, whether a person wishes to invest or not. 



i. <•:■ til 









Fwrkjield, Monterey Co., Cal. 



July I, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 






Summerland in San ta Barbara County enjoys the dis- 
tinction of being the only belt in the world which draws 
some of its oil from beneath the bed of the ocean. It is a 
new field and a comparatively prosperous one. There are 
many wells along the beach, "just above tide water, and 
al on the wharfs which extend out into the ocean, 
mmerland the Southern Pacific Railroad has a wharf 
extending into the ocean four hundred yards, on which 
Mr. Treadwell has sunk wells 50 feet apart for a 
considerable distance, and from them is being pumped up 
quantities of oil of a good quality. The Duquesne Oil Com- 
pany is one of the heaviest operators in this district, and 
will soon construct a wharf extending into the ocean for 
1400 feet. From this long structure wells will be sunk at 
regular intervals into the oil deposits below. One singu- 
lar fact is that the oil brought up from beneath the ocean 
floor is of a better quality than that produced by the wells 
on the shore lands. The quality improves as distance 
from the beach increases. 

THE GREAT WESTERN OIL COMPANY. 

This Company is one of the most substantial organiza- 
tions now operating in the oil district of this State and its 
holdings are doubtless among the most valuable. The 
members of the company are Oeo. W. McNear, P. E. 
Bowles, L. L. Long, W. H. Chickering, C. 6. Wilcox, 
C. B. Simmons, S. Mitchell. G. W. McNear, President; 
L. L. Long, Secretary. 

The company only made its purchase after having made 
a careful examination of the region which lies in Fresno 
County in the Coalinga oil district. The oil belt of those 
fields runs from Northwest to Southeast and the holdings of 
the Great Western Oil Company are all within that terri- 
tory. 
Following are the lands of the Company: 

1280 acres in township 20 S. R. 1G E. 

800 " " " 15 •' 

2880 " " " 19 " " 15 " 

640 19 " " 16 " 

This is the township and range in which section 20 is 
located which is therefore the great oil producer of the 
Coalinga field. 

640 acres in township 18 S. R. 15 E. 

2240 " " •• 14 " 

320 ' 17 ' " 

a total of 8800 acres. 

When it is considered that one acre is ample for a well, 
the possibilities of the vast body of oil producing land may 
be more fully realized. 

There has been sufficient development done in the Coal- 
inga fields to establish the fact that this land is rich in 
oil. At the present time the output of the surrounding 
wells is more than 90,000 barrels per month, and from a 
single well an average of 800 barrels is taken daily.. 

The general geological formation of the lands held by 
the company is the same as that of section 20— the banner 
producer of the district. The oil found in this immediate 
vicinity is a refining oil, and flattering results have been 
obtained from tests made by the best experts in San 
Francisco. 

As a matter of fact owing to the oil wealth of territory 
immediately contiguous there can be no doubt of the great 
value of the lands of the Company. Water is . an import- 
ant element in the development of oil fields, and the Great 
Western has secured a fine water right in the form of 
springs, which will yield an abundant supply for all pos- 
sible purposes for operation of its holdings. Owing to the 
development all about them, and the actual production of 
oil of commercial value in large quantities, the lands of this 
company are destined to prove of great and immediate 
money value. 

The development of the oil interests of California is of 
the utmost importance to the whole State. The question 
of cheap fuel is encountered at the very doorway of success- 
ful manufacturing. With abundant oil, fuel will be cheap and 
there can be no fear of the over-production of the article. 

A new era of development, progress and manufacture 
will appear with the production of petroleum. Of an arti- 
cle of such general use we shall never be able to produce 
more than will find readv and profitable market. 

The Great Western Oil Company are proceeding to im- 
mediately work their immense holdings, and are destined 
to take a front rank in the list of oil producers 



BANK OF HANFORD 



.HANF0RD, CAL. 



.1. B. RtwMIIS, President 

.1. i>. Hi' km \n, I'nshicr 



BlODLB, Man«Rcr 
A. II. Kino. I 



Crarpmpnr or ,hc 'ondttlon of tho Bank of I, mo in lArift 
}ldiemer;r Hanfordat thecioscf business J U 9? 3°- '°9°- 

ASSETS. LIABILITIES. 

Loans and Discounts . |977fMM Capital Slook II5I.OO0UI 

Bonds. Stocks & Warrants &M88 ft5 Reserve 10 0(0 01 

Real Estate 16.780 01 „_ .., ,'.'..',1" 

HulliHnK and Premises 
Furniture and Fixtures 



Duo from B;inU« 
Collections In Transit 
Cash on Hand 



q Protlt and Loss 3.550 66 

4 00i 00 ! Dividends, Unpaid i 



97,469 99 

4.0N H.H 

91,777 "t 



Deposits 9M.MI in 

Due Banks and Bankers. . 5,654 68 



YARDS : 

Hanford, Visalia, 
and Lindsay 

Ed. £. Youyq, 

Secretary and Gen. Mgr. 



t 



Central 

l^i mber 
<5o/npar)y 



HANFORD, CAL. Telephone, Main 5. 



♦ Complete estimates and plans furnished for Der- 

$ ricks, Power Houses, and Buildings of all classes. 
I ' 



| W. R. McQUIDDY 



^ttori?ey at law. 1 



Hanford, Gal 



I 

fi Especially posted on land titles in Coalinga oil district Jr 

All communications received will be promptly answered 4 

♦■ . i 

Correspondence Solicited. is 



Jtattyar? Brothers 



i 



DEALERS IN 



HARFORD. CAL. $ 
GRAIN, DRIED FRUIT, 
HONEY, BEES' -WAX . . 
AND RAISINS 



i 

i 
i 

i 

if Qeperal Irisurarjre. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 



WELLS OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 



The Western Oil and Asphalt Company of Los Angeles, 
a picture of a portion of whose plant is reproduced in this 
issue, has the largest and best equipped oil refinery in 
Southern California, having a capacity of 375 barrels 
per day. This company some years ago, as agent, handled 
all the different brands of asphalt produced in this State, 
with indifferent success and considerable travail, owing to 
the uncertainty of the quality of the material. Most of 
these asphalts were found to contain too large a percent- 
age of foreign ingredients, at the same time lacking uni- 
formity in quality, while some proved valueless on account 
of careless treatment in the refining process. After many 
discouragements in the attempt to market these asphalts 
had been suffered, it was concluded that the only way to 
procure an article that would be free from the detriments 
attached to those already in vogue, was to engage in the 
refining business, and obtain an asphalt against which it 
would be impossible to urge an objection. 

The Western Oil and Asphalt Company makes a supe- 
rior gas engine, stove and gas distillates, and the best 
line of lubricants ever produced from California oil. Here- 
tofore it has been objected that the cylinder and engine 
oils made from California crude contained aspbaltum, which 
naturally would be a condemnation. This company guar- 
antees the lubricants manufactured by it to be free from 
all trace of asphaltum. Though producing these distil- 
lants and lubricants, the Western Oil and Asphalt Com- 
pany has made the central feature of its business the ob- 
taining of an ideal asphaltum. 

It has succeeded, through an experience obtained from 
year? of experiments and by very close attention to the 
minutte attendant upon successful refining, in obtaining an 
article which is practically pure bitumen. The bitumen 
is conceded by the most reliable and foremost experts to 
be the valuable property in the asphalt. 

We are permitted by the Western Oil and Asphalt Com- 
pany to insert a copy of analyses made hy A. W. Dow, 
inspector of Asphalts and Cements for the District of Col- 
umbia, which confirm the claim of this company to be the 
manufacturers of the purest and best asphalt in the trade: 

Solid Flux 

Grade D. Grade G. 

Total bitumen soluable in carbon 

disulphide. 99. 10 per cent 99.68 per cent 

Organic matter not bitumen '"■ 52 " 0.12 " 

Carbonate of lime none none 

Silica and clay 0.38 per cent 0.20 per cent 

Examination of the above bitumen to determine the per 
cent soluble in petroleum naphtha sp. gr. 0.682 at 60 deg. 
P. boiling between 60 and 80 deg. F., resulted as follows : 

Solid Flux 

Grade D. Grade G. 

Petrolene (soluble in naphtha) 77.29 per cent 97.20 per cent 

Asphaltene (insoluble in naphtha).. 22.71 " 2.80 " 

The following test was made by keeping 30 grams of the 
sample exposed to 300 deg. F. for 6 hours in an open ves- 
sel 2 inches in diameter, and which showed the following 
losses : 

Solid Grade D 0.13 per cent 

Flux Grade G 0.34 

None of the samples were appreciably altered by being 
kept at 300 deg. F. for 6 hours in an open vessel. 

From these analyses it will be seen at a glance that 
these asphalts are practically pure bitumen, hence nearly 
twice the volume of paving mixture can be obtained per 
pound by the use of this material than from other asphalts 
which contain little above 50 per cent pure bitumen. 

As a great deal depends upon the softening agent used 
in compounding asphaltic mixtures, the Western Oil and 
Asphait Companv produces a "G" grade Flux, which is 
'unequaled, being 99.68 per cent pure bitumen and abso- 
lutely free from water or volatile oil. Unprejudiced ex- 
perts acknowledge the good California fluxes to be supe- 
rior as softening agents to the paraffine residuum of the 
East. This company has succeeded in procuring a hard 
asphalt, rich in gums and full of life, being 99.10 per cent 
pure bitumen, together with a flux, free from water and 
volatile oils, 99 68 per cent pure bitumen, so that the man- 
ipulator must be stupid indeed who fails to achieve glorious 
results from the use of these materials. 



As a matter of economy to the consumer, the richness 
of these asphalts reduces the cost in the matter of freight 
rates, as he pays for the transportation of pure bitumen, 
and not foreign matter, which latter he can judiciously 
add to meet requirements. 

The plant has a capacity of 600 tons per month, nearly 
all of which finds a market in the principal States of the 
East, being used for street paving, manufacture of roofing, 
reservoir lining, pipe dipping, electrical insulation, etc. 

As stated at the outset, the oil interests of Southern 
California are of much earlier development than those of 
the central part of the State; but if one may judge from 
the splendid results now beiog accomplished in Fresno and 
adjoining districts, it is entirely probable that the later 
discoveries will send the oil regions north of Tehachapi to 
the front, and keep them there. 

As far back as 1857 a well, 800 feet deep, was put 
down in Los Angeles, but for some reason work was sus- 
pended and nothing came of it. In August, 1893, there 
was a revival of oil interest in that city, and ever since that 
time the production has increased so rapidly that up to 
date the total output has been more than five million bar- 
rels, and prices have ranged from 30 cents a barrel to 
$1.65 cents a barrel in the field. The minimum price was 




Map of Coahnga District 



July I, 18*). 



SAN FRANCISCO NBWS LETTER 

5ECTIDN 20TI9 5 R.I 5. E 






»7 




reached in May, 1895, and the maximum price in Mai ch, 
1897. At the present time the average price per barrel 
is $1. 

There have been twelve hundred wells drilled in Los An- 
geles, and the percentage of them which have paid is very 
high. The average cost of these wells was $2800. 

The Puente oil fields are in Los Angeles county, and 
about five miles distant from Puente Station, on the South- 
ern Pacific Railway. Prof. W. L. Watts, in his report 
on them to the State Mining Bureau, says " the hills in 
which the Puente oil wells are situated appear to be an 
east extension of a line of elevation which can be traced in 
a southeasterly direction from the city of Los Angeles. 

At Pullerton, Los Angeles county, there is great activ- 
ity. The Santa Pe railway is operating and developing 
more than a dozen wells, and wells are being put down by 
private parties. The field is a promising one. 

The map of Section 20, Tp. 19 S. E. 15 E., M. D. M., 
which is published in this number, shows the exact loca- 
tion of the oil belt which has made that region famous as 



the banner oil producer of the district. About section 20 
the lands have all been carefully tested and locations and 
purchases made. It is almost impossible to obtain land in 
the district; the only way in which one can become inter- 
ested is by buying stock in one of the many companies or- 
ganized for operation in the Coalinga oil belt. 



Telephone, Main 5104, 
Cable Address, "Luofeward," 

(Nevada Metallurgical Works.) 

71 & 73 STEVENSON STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Stamp Mill and Concentrator In operation 
on premises, 



Established 1869. 
A. H. Wabjj. 

ASSAYING 
ANALYSES 
SAMPLING 
Practical working 
tests of ore by all 
Processes. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 




Portion of the Plant of Western Oil and Asphalt Co., Los Angeles, Col 





Portable Rig at Parkfleld Oil Wells, Monterey Co. 



Rig No. 1 Parkfield Oil Co., Cholame Valley, Monterey Co. 




Oil Storage Tanks He feet diameter, 30 feet high. Capacity t,WfiO0 gallons each. Erected by Lacy Maw) act,,, 



vfacti/ring Co., Los Angeles, Cat 



July I, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



29 




Sttmmcrland Beach Wells — low tide. Santa Barbara Co., Val. 



Dr. Ed. E. Hill, President. 



Capt. Oliver Eldridge. Vice-President. 



Continental Building ^ l^oan 



ASSOCIATION, OF CALIFORNIA ESTABLISHED 1889 



Subscribed Capital $8,500,000 

Paid-in Capital 1,310,000 

Profit and Reserve Fund 175,000 

Monthly Income, over 100,000 

DIVIDEND DECLARED JUNE 30, 1899- 

Ordinary Deposits 6 per cent per annum 

One Year Term Deposits » »•■■■• 7 " 

Class " F " Stock 10 

Class "A" Stock 14 



HOME OFFICE: 

222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cat. 



WILLIAM, C0RBIN, 
Secretary and Gen'l Manager. 






3© 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 




THE Continental Oil & Development Company is com- 
posed of business men of San Francisco, who, after care- 
ful investigation, bought outright one hundred acres of 
land in the very centre of the Coalinga oil belt, and in the 
section adjoining the famous section 20, which has made 
fortunes since it was opened. On either side of the Com- 
pany's land the indications are all that could be desired. 
Within a stone's throw the oil may be dipped up from an 
oil spring with a dipper. . The Company is spending its 
money in development. A small quantity of unassessable 
stock will be sold to assist in sinking wells, which, unless 
all proved indications fail, will yield immediate and large 
returns. There is nothing of the speculative in the Conti- 
nental's work. The land is owned by it outright, and 
every dollar paid in goes into honest development. There 
is every reason to believe that the stock, which is now 
sellins at its face value of ten dollars per share, will be 
worth many times that amount by the first day of Janu- 
ary 1900. The offices of the Continental Oil & Develop- 
ment Company are at room 1, 22 Market street; its offi- 
cers are William Corbin, President; L. Chambers, Vice- 
President; A. E. Rudell, Secretary and Treasurer; ard 
Bank of California, repository. 







I FIREWORKS 



I 

For the FOURTH I 

$1, $2, $3 I 
$5, $8, $12, $20 I 

and upwards £ 

I 



Save money by buying dlreot from the makers. Assorted boxes 
(or ohlldren, Including Flreoraokers, Torpedoes, eto 



Lawn assortments 



CALIFORNIA FIREWORKS CO. 

219 Front street Factory— Sixteenth ave. & L St. 



rfe♦'ferfe»'fe»^^ , fe»^* , »i^fe« , 'fr»^^t»'fe W=**kW¥*i& 




Residence of F. W. Hunter, Parkfield, Monterey Co., Cal. 



*^r*c*^*fe^'^^*'»*^»*^»*'»*^»*'»*^***^»*^ 



THE GALL 



is the ONLY San Francisco Dally which has 
dared to take an outspoken stand for public mor- 
als. The only paper making a fight against the 
corrupting influences of the race tracks and gam- 
bling dens which are a blot on the reputation of 
the city and State. The "sure thtnft" races are 
NOT ADVERTISED In Its columns. Do you 
not prefer such a paper In your homes? 



THE SUNDAY GALL 



contains a choice selection of literature and 
speolal features Its pages for women are filled 
with the latest Society and Fashion notes. 



i 



Delivered t>u Carriers. 65 cents a month. 



A. B. Bialer, Attorney, Parkfield, Monterey '',,., Oa 



Weekly CALL $1.00 per uear. 

£ W. S. Leaks, Manager, j 



July i ( 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS U-TTER. 



3i 




PROSPECTUS OF THE CARIBOU 
OIL FINING COMPANY, 

[INCORPORATED ] 



OU Weils Near Westlake Park— Los Angeles. 

THE above half-tone gives one a very excellent idea of 
the appearance of a part of the city of Los Angeles, 
where oil has been struck. It must be confessed that 
the tall derricks are not things of beauty, but they are 
erected wherever there is a prospect of striking oil, with- 
out the slightest regard to the unfortunate change they 
make in the landscape. There can be no doubt that it is 
poor policy to dig oil wells and put in pumping plants 
every twenty or thirty feet, as has been done in Southern 
California. The sand is soon impoverished, and one well 
draws away from its neighbor. In the East wells are 
sunk at greater distances apart, and it has been found to 
yield much better results. The above is a picture taken 
at Westlake Park, a close suburb of Los Angeles, and 
well illustrates the practice there. 

THE attention of business men who have money to in- 
vest is called to the figures presented by the Continen- 
tal Building and Loan Association in this issue. Its suc- 
cess has been remarkable, and the fine homes built by it 
during the last ten years may be seen all over the State, 
and are numbered by the hundred. Lastyear alone 175 resi- 
dences were built by its aid in California. It is the strong- 
est institution of the kind in the West. The large capital 
is kept constantly at work, and in this way rapidly accu- 
mulates. Money taken in to-day is loaned to-morrow, and 
the interest on that loan is invested again, and so com- 
pounds. The Continental is a successful institution be- 
cause it is conducted on strict business principles. 

Do you know that Smith's Dandruff Pomade has cured thousands 
of cases of dandruff, itching scalp, eczema and failing hair when all 
other remedies have failed? Price 50c at all druggists. Sample Free. 
Address Smith Bros., Fresno, Cal. 

Don't suffer with dyspepsia Baldwin's Dyspepsia Capsules, with 
Baldwin's Health Tablets, will cure. Ferry Drug Store, 8 Market street. 

You never have a ''head" In the morning from drinking Jesse Moore 
"AA" Whiskey. 

Jackson's Napa Soda never tires. 




Oil Welts Near Wesllale Park— Los Angeles. 



THK I ARIBOD <>1T. MINIMi COMPANY lias been incorpor 
alert with a Oapltal Stock of One Hundred Thousand PnilarsdlOO,- 

000.00) divided into One Hundred Thousand (lOO.OOOj shares of the 
par value of One Hollar ($1.00) each. 

The Company baa secured One Hundred and Twenty (120) acres 
of choice oil land, situated in the Coalinga 011 Belt, Fresno Connty, 
Cat., one mile from the famous flowing oil wells, one of which pro- 
duces 1.000 barrels per day, and others from 200 to 600 barrels per 
day; and as the same oil sand and seepage of oil shows on the land 
secured by this Company, it is only reasonable to expect equally 
favorable results when wells are drilled. 

The Company has already purchased and paid for the land. It 
has also contracted with competent well-borers, who have had large 
experience in the oil fields of the Coalinga Oil District in this State, 
to drill the first well and take payment in stock of the Company. 
This arrangement makes it necessary to provide sufficient funds for 
the purchase of machinery and casing only— say about Eight Thou- 
sand Dollars. ($8,000 00) To raise this amount of money, the Com- 
pany will place on the market a sufficient number of its shares of 
stock, holding the balance in its Treasury as an asset. 

There are several reasons why the stock of this Company is more 
desirable than that of the average oil company— such as the follow- 
ing: 

First: Its location adjoins the land upon which the best yielding 
wells have been sunk; 

Second : The formation, oil sands and oil seepages, are the same 
as on the lands adjoining where the largest wells are now flowing; 

Third : It is eaay of access and easy to work ; has water necessary 
for the operation of machinery, and is in proximity to a supply of 
fuel; 

Fourth : It is only eight miles from a large oil storage tank, the 
pipe line to which runs within two miles of the property ; the pro- 
duct, therefore, can be piped to railroad with but Utile expense; 

Fifth: The selection by the Company of experienced drillers, 
well acquainted with the oil fields— men who have been identified 
with the development of the Coalinga District from the date of its 
discovery, and the fact that they have sufficient faith in the Caribou 
Oil Mining Company's property to enter into a ( contract to drill the 
first well and take payment therefor in the stock of the Company at 
its face value. 

REPORTS ONT PROPERTY.— Letter of the Former Owner. 

"Hanford, Cal.. June 4, 1899. 
Mr. E. E. Bush, San Franoisco— Friend Bush: In replying to yours of 
the 2d, will say that before t made any move to purchase the 1-J0 acres in 
the S. W. H of Sec. 22, T. 19, S. R , 15 E ; had th" pergonal opinions of such 
men as M. m. Lavalle George Dairy, F. M. Lhrisim.n, C. A. Can Held, and 
others; in fact every one I talked to gave me a favorable opinion of No. 
22. Mr. ChrUtman not only gave me his opinion, but showed me the ledge 
of oil sand dipping under the above mentioned ground, which sand you 
have seen your&eir. After examination of sand anu finding oil seepages 
on the East naif of the Section, I came to the conclusion that it was an al- 
most sure thing for siriKing oil at from7 Oiol 0. feet. The sand, as you 
know, dips at an angle of about 32 or 33 dtgrees to the souih and east, 
showing that the seepage on the east part of the section comes from the 
kidney of oi i sand lj ing betwt en wntre the sand crops out on the wes t siae, 
and where the seepage occurs on the east side. I wouid not attempt to ex- 
plain, In short, nil ti-e reasons why I bought the land, but will bay that be- 
fore buying it I had the opinions oi nearly all the oil men in the field 

Truiy jours, [signed) C. C. spinks. 

REPORT OF H. G. McOUTCHEN, DRILLER. 

"Coalinga, June 2, 1899. 
MR. E.E. Bush— Dear Sir : I have been all over Section 22. near Oil Cityi 
Think it is as good a prospect as there is outside of Oil City. It has every 
surface indication that there is in Oil city. There is a very heavy oil sand 
that crops out on the west line of the bectlon, dipping at about one-third 
plich to the east. There are sev. ral seepages of very high-grade oil coming 
from croppings on the lelge. It is overlaid with a heavy ledge of black 
shale. It is well located easv to get to, and water will gravitate to any 
portion of the land that you would want to operate. Your production will 
gravitate to railroad. In fact, I think it the beat all-round prospect in the 
field. Yours respectfully, LSlgned] H. G. McCutchen, Coalinga." 

" Hanpoed, Cal., June 4, 1899. 
Ma. E, E. Bush, San Francisco, Cal.— Dear Sir: Regarding your Inquiry 
as to my opinion of Section 22, T, 9 S. R. 15, 1 will say that so far as sur- 
face indications go which Is all any one can go by. Section 22 must be 
cla-sed as among the best, i( not ihe very best undeveloped sections of oil 
land in this District. I have been over and examined the l*nd on several 
occasions Inmy opinion the west half will prove to be the best, espec- 
ially the southern portion of it. We are all aware that oil, like gold, is 
where you find it, but If you are in the business and wa t to lake a chance, 
lean say that I know of no better venture than 22, if sou can get in right. 
Yours truly, [digned] A Uaribau." 

"Coalinga, Cal., June 2. 1899. 
MR. E. E. Bush, San Franoisco. Cal. --Dear Sir: In reply to your in- 
quiry as to my opinion of the S, W. Jtfof Sec. 32, T 19, S. R 15, I would 
say that I have examined it thoroughly and tlnd surface indications very 
good. I ba^e prospected a number of other places, and this ia the best 
pfospect I have found in ihe State. Section 22 is considered one of the 
best undeveloped sections of oil land in the Coalinga District. I am of 
the opinion that there will be some very good wells fouDd on the we-t half 
of this section. All that any one can go S>y is surface indications, such as 
seepages and croppings ot oil sand. If you are tbialiiog of going into the 
business, I k<-ow of no better oil land anywhere In the Si ate 

Yours respectfully, [Signed] A J. Kirkwood, Coalinga, Cal." 

OFFICERS OF THE COMPANY.— John Moss, President, 606 
Sutter street, San Francisco; E. E Bush. Vice-President, Artersia 
Block, Hanford. Cal.; Augustus Waterman, Secretary and Treas- 
urer, Room 40, Nevada Block, San Francisco. 

For further particulars, please refer to the Secretary. 



3* 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July I, 1899. 




ALTHOUGH the city 
is, from a Society 
standpoint, a howling 
wilderness just now, it 
must not be supposed 
that it is quite devoid of 
the social element; and, to prove this, theatre parties are 
by no means infrequent happenings, those who are by 
force of circumstance detained in town taking that means 
of enjoying themselves, and at the same time giving pleas- 
ure to a few friends similarly situated. Quite a number were 
made up to welcome Denis O'Sullivan in opera, he making 
bis first appearance as Shamus O'Brien at the Tivoli on 
Thursday evening, while the Columbia has one or more 
theatre parties every night. 

Surgeon-General Sternberg paid what might be called a 
flying visit of inspection to San Francisco last week, and 
accomplished a great deal of work during his short stay. 
It was not, however, all work while he was here, as the 
many friends whom he has in this city vied with each other 
in offering him hospitality— so much, in fact, that he was 
obliged to decline two-thirds of it. Among the lucky ones 
who entertained him were Mr. and Mrs. Leopold Michaels, 
who gave him an opera party, preceded by a very hand- 
some dinner in the private dining-room of the Hotel Riche- 
lieu last Friday evening. The table was profusely and 
beautifully decorated with flowers and the menu delicious. 
Colonel and Mrs. Forwood, Colonel Greenleaf, Major and 
Mrs. Girard, Major and Mrs. Hall were the other guests 
who composed the party. Major and Mrs. Girard also 
entertained Colonel Sternberg at dinner, at the Presido, 
a number of friends being asked to meet him. 

St. Stephen's Episcopal Church was very prettily 
dressed for the wedding of Miss Mabel Smith and Chas. 
Percy Morse, which took place there last Monday even- 
ing. Fern leaves were used in the body of the church, and, 
combined with palms and smilax, they also decked the 
chancel, pink roses ornamenting the altar. The church 
was crowded with guests when the bridal party entered 
at nine o'clock, the four ushers appearing first upon the 
scene. Then came the bride' sister, Miss Dora Smith, 
who officiated as maid-of-honor. She wore a gown of or- 
gandie trimmed with Valenciennes lace, and carried a 
cluster of La France roses. Following her was the pretty 
blonde bride, with her father, robed in white brocaded 
silk and wearing a voluminous tulle veil; a diamond star 
appeared in the fold of lace at her throat, and she car- 
ried a large bunch of bride's roses. At the chancel they 
were met by the groom and his best man, his brother, H. 
G. Morse. The Reverend E. .1. Lion tied the nuptial 
knot. A large reception was held at the Smith residence 
on Grove street, where, in a floral bower placed in the 
bow window of the drawing-room, the young couple re- 
ceived the congratulations of their friends. Later a hand- 
some supper was served, and the display of presents was 
quite elaborate and beautiful 

Mrs. S. J. Fields' friends are making ready to welcome 
her once more, as she leaves Washington this week, ac- 
companied by her sister, Mrs. Smith, for a visit to Califor- 
nia, which will likely be of some duration. Mrs. Field has 
always been a favored guest in San Francisco, and her 
coming has hitherto been regarded as a signal for an un- 
limited round of ladies' luncheons during ber stay, with 
her as chief guest, and the approaching visit will doubt- 
less be a repetition of those gone before. Another arri- 
val for society to look forward to is that of our erstwhile 
" Bird'e" Fair, who, 'tis said, proposes accompanying her 
sister, Mrs. Oelrichs, to the Coast this Autumn, for the 



purpose of exhibiting her lately acquired lord and master 
(who, of course, will be of the party) to her dear friends 
in California. They will pass the greater of their stay at 
Del Monte. 

That delightful watering place, Del Monte, is still in the 
van, large numbers of guests arriving daily. Those who 
are expected there to-day are Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph 
Spreckels, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Huntington and Mijs 
Edith, the Misses Emily and Ethel Hager, Mr. and Mrs. 
Will Whittier, Miss Ethel Keeney, Miss Leontine Blake- 
man and Miss Gertie Carroll. Those already there 
include Mrs. Henry Schmeidell, Mr. and Mrs. McAl- 
lister, the Misses Dore, Mrs. W. P. Fuller, the Fred 
Zeiles, Miss Laura Bates, Mrs. Wm. Fries, Miss Helen 
Hecht, etc. 

Castle Crag promises to be a formidable rival to Del 
Monte, as there are numbers who prefer mountain air to 
that of the sea. Among the guests at the Tavern are 
Judge Carroll Cook and his daughters, Mrs. George 
Crocker, the Misses Rutherford, Mrs. E. B. Coleman, Miss 
Lena Blanding. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Blanding and Miss 
Susie, Mrs. J. M. Goewy and Miss Gertrude, Mrs. R. B. Wal- 
lace, Mrs. Throckmorton and Mrs. and Miss Santa Marina. 
Mrs. Loughborough and her daughters are also in the moun- 
tain region. Mrs. I. Requa's visit to Castle Crag was cut 
short in a most unhappy manner, Mr. Requa's serious ac- 
cident calling her home before she was well settled at the 
Tavern, to which she will, 'tis said, return ere long, as 
Mr. Requa is rapidly convalescing. Tarn McGrew re- 
turned from a visit to Castle Crag early in the week. 

Mr. and Mrs. I. S. Heller have gone to San Rafael for 
the season. Mrs. Wm. A. Patton is there for the sum- 
mer; also W. I. Kip, who will be joined there by his fam- 
ily after their visit to Soda Springs, where they will go 
upon their return from their trip to Yosemite, where they 
now are. Miss Lillie O'Connor is also at San Rafael. 

Mrs. J. D. Spreckels and her daughters are at Coro- 
nado, where they always rusticate during the summer; 
Miss Gertrude Forman will also be there for some weeks; 
Dr. and Mrs. Henry Gibbons and family leave town to- 
day for a month's visit to Rowardennan; Judge and Mrs. 
Hayne have selected Santa Barbara for their summer 
locale, and go to Del Monte early in the autumn, 
when the rest of the large Parrott connection will also be 
there. Catalina Island is to be the Mecca for divers yacht- 
ing parties, as for instance those of E. A. Wiltsee and 
Harry Simpkins. 

Mr. and Mrs. Downey Harvey, the Misses Harvey and 
Miss Alice Hager sailed from New York for Europe last 
Tuesday. 

George Newhall is in rather hard luck: being a passen- 
ger on the Nippon Maru he has had several doses of quar- 
antine, and is at present a guest of the authorities at An- 
gel Island. Mr. and Mrs E. F. Preston and Miss Preston 
have been at the Palace this week. 

The wedding of Mrs. Alice Brown, daughter of Irving 
M. Scott, and Dr. Reginald K. Smith, U. S. N.. whose 
engagement announcement came to us from New York 
last week, took place in that city at noon last Wednesday, 
at "The Little Church Around the Corner," the Reverend 
George C. Houghton, Rector of the Church, officiating. 
The ceremony was of the simplest possible character, only 
a few friends being present; the bride, who wore a gown 
of white silk trimmed with lace and a hat to correspond, 
was unattended except by her father, who gave ber away, 
and her brother, Lawrence Scott, was the groom's best 
man. The young couple are passing the honeymoon at 
the home of the groom's parents in Alabama, and on their 
return will reside at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, where the 
groom, Dr. Smith, is at present stationed. 

There is to be a fancy dress ball at the Hotel Belve- 
dere on Monday night, to attend which a number of peo- 
ple will go over from the city. 

Consul John Simpson and family will spend a few weeks 
at Lake Tahoe. 



A place of interest for visitors is the Gump Art Gallery of Paint- 
ings, by European masters. No. 113 Geary street. 



Baldwin s Dyspepsia Capsules give qulok relief and permanent oure 
Ferry Drug Store, 8 Market street. 



July i, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



.1.1 




Rubicon River and Springs, Near Tahoe. 

Rubicon Soda Springs, ten miles from Lake Tahoe, will be 
open to the public on next Tuesday, the 5thinst., and offers 
to those who wish to get away into the woods, commune 
with nature, recuperate and enjoy life, an ideal habitation. 
Not only is this spot entirely off from the beaten path of sum- 
mer resorts, but the springs are noted for their splendid med- 
icinal qualities, which are most beneficial for liver, kidney 
and stomach troubles. The traveler reaches Lake Tahoe 
by the Southern Pacific, and from McKinney's, on the lake, 
a fine stage conveys the guest through grand scenery to 
Rubicon Springs, where he will find a hotel and a home for 
a day or a month. The ride is delightful, and the pleased 
traveler finds himself in the heart of the mighty Sierras, 
6000 feet high, and at the ample rustic lodgings provided 
in the untouched wildnesses of nature, reached after a 
romantic and delightful ride. Rubicon Springs offer an 
unequaled invitation to all who love the deep woods, teem- 
ing trout streams, wholesome food and clean lodgings. 
The rates for entertainment are most reasonable — from 
$7 to $10 per week — with all of the grand Sierra's delights 
to draw on for health and pleasure. The property is 
owned by D. Abbott and managed by Mrs. T. B. Smith, a 
lady of large experience in the hotel business. Excellent 
bnard and lodging can be had at the low rate of $10 and 
$12 per week or $2 per day. 

Cards are out announcing the marriage of Miss Mabel, 
daughter of Mrs. V. B. Balleau, and Sidney L M. Starr. 
The ceremony will be solemnized at St. Mary's Cathedral, 
at 8 o'clock on the evening of Saturday, July 8th. 

Dr. and Mrs. Crowley and family, and Dr. and Mrs. Dunn 
of Oakland, will go to Highland Springs next week for 
their summer vacation. 

Miss Edith M. Tolfree, daughter of L. M. Tolfree of Los 
Gatos, has just returned from the University of Chicago, 
and will spend the summer at that place. 

Among many who will spend this month at Hotel de Red- 
wood are: Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie, Attorney-General 
Tirey L. Ford and family, and Attorney James Lang- 
horne and family. 

Mrs. P. H. Massey and Miss Florence Sherwood are 
spending the summer at Glenwood. 

Miss Lowry is at present at Shasta Springs. 

Lieutenant Lincoln Pay Kilbourne, U. S. A., is one of the 
arrivals of the week, and is detailed for duty at the Pre- 
sidio. 

The most delicious coffee, rolls, and cake, moderate 

prices, at Roemer's Original Vienna Cafe, 205 Kearny St. 



At the Maison Eiohe, corner Geary street and Grant avenue, 
champagne is reduced to$l per quart and pints $2. Gentlemen can 
have mercantile lunch from 11 to 2 o'clock in private rooms without 
extra charge. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 610 Montgomery street, S. F., deals 
in all Hinds ot newspaper Information, business, personal, polltloal, from 
pressor State, Coast, and Country. Tel. Main 1048. 



Mothers, be sure and use 
children while teething. 



'Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 



THE sdvanoe ol scientific and active research has 
been marked in the understanding ol !!>.• needs of the 
human eye. and nearly evei pllanot for 

oorreotlng the vision is being produw 
manufacturing optician, at L'ol Kearnj tlmr 

oughly up-to-date in all that pertains to his business. The 
wry newest and most improved optical goods can always 
be had of him, and his facilities tor fitting the eye are un- 
excelled. He also carries a full line of photographic goods 
and supplies; and his stock of spectacles, eye glasses, 
opera, field, and marine glasses, barometers, thermome- 
ters, microscopes, compasses, artificial eyes, etc., is large 
and strictly first-class. 

THE San Francisco Letter Carriers' Mutual Aid Asso- 
ciation was organized in 1888, and. as its name indi- 
cates, is a most useful and benevolent organization. 
The annual picnic will take place to-morrow, and should 
be largely attended. Every dollar paid to the Association 
goes to aid the sick and helpless. The picnic will be held 
at Schuetzen Park, San Rafael. Good music, good order, 
and a fine day's outing are assured all who attend. 



J 



B. REDMUND, Supervisor of Monterey county, 
i while engaged in sinking a water well last Wednes- 
day, struck a flow of oil at a depth of 40 feet. The Park- 
field Oil Company has leased this property, and will be 
drilling inside of 10 days. They have a derrick up, and 
are placing machinery about 350 yards from the strike 
made by Mr. Redmund. 




Many people have gone to the country for their regular sum 
nier vacation ; hut those who remain do not forget tbat Swain's" 
Bakery and restaurant, 213 Sutter street, is the best restaurant in 
the city, that luncheons taken there are delicious, and dinners more 
so; that the pies, cakes, and breads made at Swain's are of the 
purest materials, and tbat orders given are delivered to all parts of 
the city promptly. 

r^R. T. FELIX GOURAUDS ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Motto 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection. It has stood the test of 50 years 
and is so harmless we taste It to be sure 
It is properly made. Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A Say re 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient): "As you ladies will use them, I 
recommend ' Gouraud's Cream ' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-goods Dealers In the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop'r. 
37 Great Jones St.. N. Y 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 61 

Amount per Share lOcents 

Levied May 8, 1899 

Delinquent in office June 12. 1899 

Day of sale of Delinquent Stock July 8. 1899 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment • — No. 86 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied May 2. 1899 

Delinquent in office July 6 1899 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock July 27 1899 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office — Room 69, Nevada Blook, »>9 »£oiilg U uiery streets, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

p, C. corsets y I 

Both Stylish and k 

Elegant. : : : J 

Made of fine materials, tiold by leading stores «£ 




34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 



" OLD PARIS " AT THE FAIR. 

ONE of the most interesting of the 
private enterprises at the Ex- 
position in Paris in 1900 will be the 
reconstruction of "Old Paris." Al- 
ready the turrets, gables and scaf- 
foldings reveal the general ensemble 
of the several historical "quarters" 
and buildings of the Paris of the 
seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 

The idea is to reproduce streets of 
the time of Louis XIII. and XIV., and 
to people them with the costumes and 
dresses of the period. The "Old 
Paris" will be built on piles and will 
extend on the Seine from the Alma 
Bridge to the Jena Bridge on a sur- 
face, part concrete and part wood, of 
20,000 square feet, with a frontage on 
the river of 850 feet. 

The part of the "Old Paris" im- 
mediately over the Seine will be sup- 
ported by 900 piles at a height of six- 
teen feet above high-water mark. 
The principal entrance will be off the 
Alma Bridge. It will be a reproduc- 
tion of the old Saint Michael Gate. 
Past the Saint Michael Gate the 
traveler will come to a square, the 
famous Prc-aux-Clercs, the meeting 
place of the duellists of the time of 
Louis XIII. Off the Pre-aux-Clercs 
to the left will be the monastery of 
the Chartreuse du Luxembourg, 
founded by St. Louis and destroyed 
during the Revolution. Immediately 
opposite will be the three-steepled 
edifice of the Parloir-aux-Bourgeois, 
the city hall of the middle age, and a 
little farther on is a tower of the old 
Louvre. 

Prom each side of the Pre-aux- 
Clercs a street will lead to a second 
square, where the Cluny cloister will 
be found, together with the Pilon of 
St. Germain des Pres and various 
other picturesque, old-time edifices. 

The two streets will be known as 
the Rue des Ramparts, and the Rue 
des Vieilles Ecoles. Behind the 
Chamber of Accounts will be the 
Grand Cour de Paris. A little further 
will be the famous Pont au Change 
and the prison of the Grand Chatelet. 



His Holiness Pope Leo XIII awards Gold Medal 





In Recognition of Benefits Received from 









M 


iT 


fil 





MARIANI WINE TUNIC 

For Body, Brain and Nerves 

Send for Book of Endorsements and Portraits, 

Free and Postpaid. 

MARIANI & CO., 52 West 15th St., New York. 

uold Met. M Presented by His Holiness Pope „„. „ ^ ...r, m_ . Ju *.. *. «■* a 

Leo xiii to M. Angeio Mariani oi Paris. For Sale at all Druggists Everywhere. Avoid Substitutes. 



ALIAS. 

IT was a licensed victuallers' meeting 
day, especially arranged for sea- 
side hotel proprietors who could come 
and compare notes. After the meet- 
ing they thronged the Strand, and you 
couldn't bump against two men run- 
ning without coming against a hotel- 
keeper. Fred Simmons and his wife 
— you boys all know Fred; he travels 
Saturdays to Mondays in prayer- 
books, his wife tells me, because that's 
the only time people buy them. He's 
a clerk in the War office the rest of 
the week, but like most Civil servants, 
makes a bit outside the office. Fred 
and his wife were passing down the 
street, when up tramps a hotel- 
keeper. 

"How do, Mr. Brown?" said the 
man, and Simmons hurriedly said, 
"How do!" and passed on. 

" What did he call you Mr. Brown 
for?" asked Mrs. Simmons. 

" Mistook me for someone else, I ex- 
pect," said Fred, and another hotel- 
keeper ran up against him. 

"Ah! glad to see you, Mr. Gorill- 
ard," said the hotel-keeper. 

" Gorillard — why did he call you 
Gorillard?" asked Mrs. Simmons. 

"'Spose there's an idiot of that 
name like me somewhere," said Fred, 
savagely, and ran into a big stout 
man. 

" Why, Mr. Fernside, how ever are 
you?" the big man asked with boister- 
ous heartiness, and offered his hand. 
"You're mistaken — er — er," 
gasped Simmons; and the man looked 
at him, and then, seeing Mrs. Simmons, 
gave him a dig in the ribs. 

"You needn't mind me," he said, 

and Fred pushed on and called a cab. 

"Whatever did that vulgar man 

mean, Fred," asked Mrs. Simmons, 

"was he intoxicated?" 

"That's it; drunk as a lord, mistook 
me for some chap— hi! cab," and he 
put his wife in, as someone slapped 
him on the shoulder. 

"Who'd have thought of seeing you, 
Mr. Percival?" cried a hearty voice, 
"and how's the missus?" 

"Goto Hades," shouted Simmons, 
springing into a cab. Cabby flicking 
his whip left the last friend aghast on 
the pavement. 

" That man said 'How's the missus?' 
and I've never seen him before," said 
Mrs. Simmons with emphasis. 

"My darling," said Fred, "there's 



a meeting of Resuscitated Lunatics at 
Exeter Hall to-day, and some are still 
a bit dotty. We've been running 
against them and I've only just found 
it out." But now Mrs. Simmons goes 
with Fred when he travels in prayer- 
books, and be says he shall give up 
the trade— it doesn't pay as it did. — 
Pick-Me-Up. 

"If I give you a quarter," said the 
old lady, kindly, "what assurance 
have I that you will Dot immediately 
go off and get intoxicated?" "Mad- 
ame," replied the polite tramp, "it 
would give me the greatest pleasure 
in the world to demonstrate Jto you 
that it isu't enough for the purpose." 
— Chicago Post. 

"Bill," said the younger man, "this 
feller wants to hear some narrer es- 
capes you've had from bear." "The 
old man, rubbing his eyes, looked the 
stranger over, and said: "Young 
man, if there's been any narrer es 
capes the bear's had 'em." — Ainslee's. 



Attorney (sternly) — The witness will 
please state if the prisoner was in 
the habit of whistling when alone. 
Witness — I don't know. I was never 
with the Drisoner when he was alone. 



Gitu Index and Purchaser's Guide 



RESTAURANTS 

POODLE DOG Restaurant, N.E. cor. Eddy 
and Mason streets. Private dining and 
banquet rooms. Telephone 429. 

A. B. Blanco & B. Bbuh 

BAY STATE Oyster House & Grill room, 
15 Stockton street and 109 O'Farrell St. 
N. M. Adler, proprietor. Tel. Main 5057 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS 

W. F. QREANY, 827 Brannan St. Select- 
ions on approval ; any place in the world. 

BOILER-MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron 
Works— 314-316-318 Main St; Iron work of 
every description designed and constructed 



CASCA FERRINE BITTERS 
The world's greatest tonic, stomachic, laxa- 
tive; cures positively constipation and 
piles. Sierra Pharmaceutical Co., 1109 
Howard street, San Francisco. 

DENTISTS. 

DR. G. A. DANZIGER, Dentist, 22 Geary 
Street, San Francisco. 



July , 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



35 



THE PURE dOY_OF SUMMERTIME- 

Ita — (Any place you like.) 
Characters— (Women.) 

Discovered — (A larjje amount of ocean, and a tine col- 
lection of KO»ns.) 
Time— (All day and a large part of the night ) 
A Vara — Nice sort of goings on, I should say I Husband 
away from Monday to Saturday; and who is the blonde 
gentleman, I should like to know, that fills in the interim? 
Another Voice — Isn't it dreadful! Dear me, I'm posi- 
tively afraid to leave home in these days, such shocking 
things go on. Who is she? 

A Third Voice — Rather ask who tons she. Father kept 

a saloon. She swept out before sunrise, and they do say 

she was married to a bartender when she was seventeen. 

After that, her father got into politics and made a fortune. 

A Fourth Voice — Divorced? 

The Third Voice — Yes: couldn't you tell it by her 
brazen manner. 

(A silence of seven seconds, while a tall, dignified, mod- 
est-looking woman passes.) 
A Voice — Dyes her hairl 

Another Voice — Yesl See how dark it is at the rootsl 
Can't be respectable. 
A Third Voice — Why, haven't you heard about her? 
Chorus— No 1 

The Third Voice — She was a chorus girl at the Casino. 
I had a friend who knew a woman that saw her there. 
Someone pays her dressmaker's bills. Broker in Wall 
Street, I think. 

A Fourth Voice— I understand she has drinks sent to 
her rooms. 

The Third Voice — Well, she didn't appear yesterday, 
you know. Probably intoxicated. 

(A silence for three seconds while a baby toddles past). 
A Voice — They say that baby's mother beats it terribly. 
A Second Voice — Well, the father beats the mother. 
A Third Voice — Too bad he's such a terrible drunkard. 
A Fourth Voice — Oh, he isn't a drunkard. The bar- 
tender told my maid that he can't get enough to affect 
him. 

First Voice — That reminds me. There's a Keeley cure 
agent here. Col. Bummer told him down in the bar the 
other night that he didn't want to be cured of drinking, 
but was willing to take a drug to give him a bigger thirst. 
Second Voice — Hear about Colonel Bummer's girl, 
Dorothy? 
Chorus— No I 

Second Voice— Went sailing in pajamas with young 
Fever- tongue at two o'clock yesteiday morning. 
Third Voice — Where was her mother, I'd like to know? 
Second Voice — In another boat with old Fever-tongue. 
(A silence of eight seconds while a quiet, gray-haired 
old lady passes along the veranda.) . 

A Voice — What a strange thing it is she always has a 
young man in her train. 
A Second Voice — But she's immensely rich, you know. 
Third Voice— Why, I heard of a woman as old as she 
marrying a mere bny in Boston a short while ago. 

Fourth Voice — But it'll never get so far as that in her 
case. She's too impetuous. 

First Voice— Her money will gloss over a great deal, 
though. Indiscretion and old age cut no figure with some 
men if a big bank account goes with them. 

(A silence of one second while a fresh and blooming girl 
of sixteen romps by with a tennis racket.) 
A Voice— That girl always runs. 
Second Voice— Thinks she has pretty ankles. 
Third Voice— Well, if I were her mother she shouldn't 
wear such gowns as she does at night. 

Fourth Voice— Why, that's done on purpose. I hear 
that six men come down every Saturday night just to look 
at her shoulders. 

First Voice— Well, she isn't anything like as young as 
her mother claims. I'm told she's twenty-seven. 

Second Voice— Oh, quite! Why, it was six years ago 
she disappeared so suddenly after being reported engaged. 
Don't you remember? She went to Europe and stayed a 
year. 

Third Voice— Yes, and since then she's been a drug in 
the market. The men understand her, I fancy. 



(Silence for ten seconds. No one passes. Silence con- 
tinues. The crowd grows nervous. One old dame taps 
her foot impatiently. Still no one passes. The women 
look at one another. 

A Voice— This is a very stupid place. 

(Owner of voice rises and waddles away.) 

SECOND VOICE (contemplating the departing waddler) — 
Dreadfully ordinary woman, that. But then her father 
was a German butcher, you know. Well, I think I'll go 
dress for dinner. 

(Owner of Second Voice rises and flaunts out of sight.) 

Third Voice— There's a spiteful cat if there ever was 
one. Always talking of others, when her own husband 
made his money in soft soap. Excuse me, ladies, I must 
go feed my canary-bird. 

(Owner of Third Voice rustles away.) 

Fourth Voice— Canary bird, indeed. She's going to 
meet old Bulbnose down in the woods. There's a sly one 
for you. Well, au revoir! I must go to my rooms and 
read my Grecian history. It's so interesting, my dears. 

(Owner.of Fourth Voice teeters down the veranda and 
vanishes. A strange, unfamilar young woman appears at 
this moment and walks unconcernedly before the remain- 
ing portion of the group. She is perfectly attired, very 
beautiful, and modest-appearing. The scandalmongers 
stop breathing for an instant. Then they look into one 
another's faces and breath hard.) 

A Voice— Who is she? 

Chorus — Don't know I 

The whole assemblage rises and passes solemnly into the 
office to c insult the register. A few moments later com- 
munications are placed in all the letter boxes. They are 
worded alike, and read: You will please meet on the 
southwest end op the piazza immediately after dinner 
this evening. a strange woman has arrived, and we 
propose to find out her record before retiring to night. 

And this U life at a, summer hotel. — Town Topics. 

Food for Babies 
Mast be nourishing and suitable and by "suitable food" is meant a 
food which a child will properly digest and assimilate. Gail Borden 
Eagle Brand Condenstd Milk for forty years has been the leading in- 
fant food. Book entitled " Babies" sent free. 



Thousands of beautiful faaes owe their oharm to the remarkable aotlon 
of Creme de Lis on the skin. It erases the Hues that care and neglect 
have made In the face. 



A Quick Response to The 

Lightest Touch 

P^ is The way The 

Kensington 

Standard Typewriter 



docs its work - 
Good Work at that 






WyckotT, Seamans & Benedict, 211 Montgomery St., San Francisco 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, 



THE AWARD AT 
CHICAGO 1893. 



Gold Medals, Paris, 1878-1889. These pens are ' the 
best Id the world." Sole a«ent for the United States, 
Mr Henhy Hoh, 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 




The News Litter has es- 
tablished at its office, No. 5H 
Kearny street, a reliable Bu- 
reau of Information, where any- 
one seeking information, routes 
0' travel, attractions, prices of 
entertainment, and all other 
facts that are necessary to a 
choice of a Summer Resort may 
be obtained FREE. 



HIGHLAND SPRINGS 



LAKE COUNTY 



The great sanitarium of the weBt; open every day in the year; new hotel 
elegantly furnished; table uosurpasseu; lighted by electricity; thousands 
cured by its waters. Finest swimming tank, bowling alley and danciDg 
hall in Lake 01 unty, together with complete livery stable, gentle saddle 
horses and ponies. . ■ _ 

Over 30 Kinds of Mineral Springs 

Physician in attendance: superb climate; beautiful mountain scenery; 

trout, deer, andt-mall game plentiful: magniflceot drives: bains in variety; 
lawn tennis and croquet: reached by the shortest stage route into Lake 
county; round-trip fare from San Francisco, via Hopland, $8; via Galls- 

to £ a $9 

Hote and Cottage Rates. $10 to $14 per week 

Take S. F. & N. P Railway to Hopland, or S. P. R. R. toCalistoga. 

For illustrated pamjhlet or furthtr information >ddress J. CRATG, 
Highland Springs, Lake county, Cal.;or see L. D.CRAIG. 316 Montgomery 
street Highland Springs mineral waters on. sale at Oakland Pioneer 
Soda water Co., Thirteenth and Webster streets, Oakland; Ahrens, Pein 
&Bullwinkel. 620 Post street S. F. 

hr\\*.l r\XZ>r\ OPPINOQ picturesquely situated 
UWMKL) Orrxll ibO amidst the pine forests 
of Lake Co.— the Switzerland of America. 
Elevation 231*1 feet; no fog; climate per- 
fect. Natural hot mineral piurge and tub 
baths, floe medicinal drinking watpr. Ex- 
cellent fishing and buntiDg. Postofflce and 
telephone on premises. Rates $8, $10 and 
$12 with special terms for families. Ac- 
commodations, table and service first class. 
Round tiip from San Francisco via Napa, 
Calls toga, 910. including fine stage drive. 

For accommodations and further par- 
ticulars addrtss 

MRS. R. J. BEEBY, proprietor, Putah P.O. 



HOTEL BENVENUE AND COTTAGES 

LAKE PORT, CAL 

Lakeport's Leading Summer Resort. 
Situated overlooking the shore on Clear Lake 
Elegant new pavll'On. Boat house and Bowl 
log Alley. Special facili lies for accommo- 
date g families with children; home cooking; 
boating, bathing, hunting, and superior fish- 
ing; no Chinese employed. 

Open all the year 
FRANK & A. M, SCALES, Proprietors 



BLUE LAKES HOTEL 

Will be conducted In a quiet, home-like 
manner, with one of the best tables in the 
county; Rates $'0 to $12 Round trip $9.50. 
S. P. & N. P. to Dklah; thence by stage from 
Palace Hotel. Address 






JOHN WILSON, 



Bertha, Lake county, Cal. 



THE GEYSER 



SPRINGS 

SONOMA COUNTY CAL 



Ninety-stx miles from San Francisco: new management; important 
Improvements ; table unsurpassed ; rates $10 to $14 per week— $2.50 per day. 
For information apply, G. GALE, Geysers. Cal. 



CARLSBAD " The most beautiful spot in Lake County 

The mineral springs are well known for marvelous cures when every- 
thing eise fails, especially incases of stomach, liver, kidney and bladder 
affections. Good b-thing; superior accommodations $10 per week; hotel 
lighted with gas ; good trout fishing and deer hunting on property. 

For particulars write W. R. McGOVERN, Carlsbad, Lake County 



SEIGLER SPRINGS LAKE county, cal. 




This delightful watering place Is located 
in the midst of the Coast Range. 

Abundance of Mineral Springs 
Hot and cold plunge baths, large swim- 
ming tank of mineral water, floe stone 
dining room ; telephone connections ; 
electric lights, livery accommodation; 
good trout fishing and hunting. Round 
trip tickets at southern Pacific offices, 
$10. 

JOHN SPAULDING, Proprietor. 



BONANZA SPRINGS 




LAKE COUNTY, CAL A 

natural camping ground ; five 
different mineral and two pure 
wate .prlngs. We cater to campers only. Fishing and hunting; cottages 
to re ;, $1.50 up per week; pure water piped to eact cottage. Hot and cold 
mineral baths; all necessaileB can be purchased on the grounds; ham- 
mocks, swings, and croquet; sumrrer houses in bhady groves. One mile 
north of Howard Spri' gs Post and Money Order omce— daily mall. Ad- 
dress, R. F. DiJCKERY, Prop.. Putah P. O., Lake County, Cal., or S. F. 
News Letter Bureau, by x Kearny St. 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Only natural mineral steam baths in Lake Co 

Hot sulphur and Iron Baths. Board $8 to $14 
per week; baths free. Address 

J. ANDERSON, 
Anderson Springs Mlddletown, Lake oounty. 
Fare, San Fraroisco to Springs and return, $9. 
Send for circular. 

93* Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, b l A Kearny street, S. F. 



GLEN BROOK Lake county 

Remember— Tf you want to hunt; if you want to 
fish; if you want to recuperate; if you want the 
bestof recreation; If you want pure air and sun- 
shine; if you want to enjoy an exhilarating climate 

Come to G/enbrook 

0. W. R. TREDWAY, proprietor Glenbrook Hotel 



FOUND AT LAST 

The best Camping Sanitarium and Summer Resort on the Coast 

Dr. C. C. O'Donnell's Mineral Springs. Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, Cal. 
46 miles from San Francisco, on S. F. and N. PR. R. (California North- 
western); twenty cottages, three, five, and eigot rooms; rent cheap; splen- 
did bathing; waters cuie liver stomach complaints, rheumatism, etc 

For full particulars, 

DR. C C. O'DONNELL, 

V<v\% Market street, S. F., Cal. 

SKAGGS HOT SPRINGS Sonoma county 

Only 4Vs hours from San Francisco and but 9 miles staging. Waters 
noted for medicinal virtues, best natural bath In State; swimming and 
boating; grand mountain scenery; good trout streams at door. 

First-Class Hotel and Stage Service. 

a. m. or 3:30 p. m. Terms $3 a day or $13 




Take Tlburon Ferry at 7 
a week. 



J. F. Molgkew, Proprietor. 




AGUA CALIENTE 
SPRINGS HOTEL 

Sonoma Valley, two hours from 
San Francisco via Tiburon ferry. 

Warm.mlneral swimming and tub 
baths. Water, gas, electrio bells. 

$iuto»i2 per week, $2 per day. 

Address 

AGUA CALIENTE PRINGS 
Agua Caliente, Sonoma co 



Before going on your vacation drop a postal to 

MOBERG'S 

For fall particulars. LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 

Short drive to any ot the famous mineral 
springs of Lake County. 



Mention this paper. 



$7 and $8 per wees 




July J, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NF.WS LETTER 



37 



Tm Robles Medicated Mud 



Cleanly, medicinal water and 
prepared mud lhat acts on the poisons 
of sw illon Joints, Impure blood and 
diseased livers like the mairnot acts 
on steel. Draws out tbe pain. 

Large, comfortable hotel. 



OTTO E. NEVER, Piop. Paso Roblea. 
City Office: 638 Market St. 





PARAISO HOT 

SPRINGS 

MONTEREY CO., CAL 

The Carlsbad of America. For health, rest, 
pleasure, olimaie, accommodations, scenery, 
flower beds, cleanliness, table, hot soda and sulphur 
tub and plunge baths, massage treatment, special bath-houses for ladles 
and lady attendant, hunting and fishing, children's playground, oroquet, 
lawn tennis, and dance hall. Grounds and cottages lighted by gas. For 
families Paraiso sttnds unsurpassed in the State; plenty of enjoyment 
for youDg and o'd Take train Third and Townsend streets, San Francisco, 
9 a.m., and at Oakland Irom first and broadway at 9: if) a. m. daily for 
Soledad. Return-trip tickets $H at S. P. onVe, 6'3 Market Btreet; beven 
mil^s bv stage. Telephone and postofflce. For Illustrated pamphlets and 
further Information address, J. PERRAULT. M. D,, Proprietor and Resi- 
dent Physician. 



BLITMEDALE 




AT THE FOOT OF MT. TAMALPAIS, 

MILL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 

Within an hour of San Francisco. 
Grounds comprise 160 aores 
Supplied with mountain Bpring water. 
Lighted by electricity. 
Golf links and tennis oourt, 
'Bus meets all trains. 



J. A. ROBINSON, LESSEE. 

Telephone ' Bllthedale." 



HOTEL MATEO and Cottages, San Mateo 



Cuisine Unsurpassed 
Climate Delightful 
Grounds Beautiful 



W. G. GRAHAM, Proprietor 




HOTEL BELVEDERE 



OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 

A superb resort. 30 minutes from San 

Francisco. 

Modern new hotel and cottages. 

Perfect service. 

Mrs. A. T. Moobe 
Belvedere 



REDWOOD 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS 

One of the most beautiful spots In tne heart of the Redwoods. 
Pine water, mtoeral springs, beautiful views, walks and drives. 
Altitude 600 feet. Kaw-s. $8 and »10 per week. Kound trip from San 
Francisco to Laurel Station, Narrow Gauge, fe. 51) 

Write for particulars. „ „ „_,, „ . . 

M. S. COX, Proprietor 

MERV/YN HOTEL &len Ellen, Sonoma Co. , Cal. 

Reached via San Franoisco & North Paolflo Railway. 
Open all the year. Good hunting and fishing. 

A. HARRISON, Proprietor 



HOTEL de 




THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM 

Ttiou«-f«)ni,T EgtHPPED with nil modern appllancrn for tbf> relief of 
suffering humanity, all form* Water Treatment, tbe fine*; Hta 
VAUlf flVTOOlDAL :in<l PaRAOIC RLK7TB1CAL appcralun, A Com * of well 
iralood itunais of both ncxe* skilled In all forma of treatment*) and 
ni*Llpulation«, Rest Cuhe scientifically carried out. The runm and 
bvsi of roonn manufactured and for sale. * * * A 'piiet, hnmn like 
place, beautiful ttcen< ry. UotTlffT Hamilton and the fami.u* l.n k i 
TATOBV In plain view; one block from eleotrlo oars, flfteon minutes walk 
fn.in the center of the city. Terms 18 to *ao per week, including medical 
attentton and regular treatment. 

Garden Citf Sanitarhm, EAST SAN JOSE PS* 

CYPRESS VILLA 

NOW OPEN 

B Street San Rafael, near Narrow Gauge 

This favorite resort has been newly furnished 
and hws undergone an entire renovation. For 
families, tourists, and the public generally, 
the accommodations are unexcelled Board 
by day, week, or month. New management. 

W. F. Wahbobton, Proprietor. 

SAMUEL SODA SPRINGS. 

Sure cure for dyspepsia, indigestion, rheumatism, and constipation. 
Hot mineral bath*. These springs are heated in Napa '"ourty, twenty 
miles east of St. Helena. 'I he water Is bottled at the springs, and contains 
its own natural gas, Stage leaves St. Helena. 

J. R. MORRIS, Proprietor, 

Napa County, Cal. 

RUBICON 
SODA SPRINGS 

On Rubicon River 10 miles from 
McKinney's, LAKE TAHOE. 

Primitive, clean home cooking. 
New management; new furnishing; 
new stages; GOOD HUNTING; fine fish- 
ing and boating on river and lakes; 
thp drive to the springs Is tbe most 
picturesque .orest drive in Califor- 
nia. These springs are noted for 
medlci'ial value In stomaoh, liver, 
and kilney troubles and relief for 
obesity. 

Rates. $10.50 to 812 a week. S3 a day. 
D, ABBOTT. MRS. T. B. SMITH, 
Manager. 
The Discoverer of Rubicon Springs. 




Strictly First-Glass 
All Modern Improvements 
Electric Lights 
Liberal Rates 



Hotel Lyndon 

Los Gatos, Cal. 



LYMAN H. TOLFREE, 

Proprietor. 



HOTEL EL MONTE 



Delightful climate; lovely drives; all large sunny rooms ; 
new management. Amerloan plan. 

JOHN NEVILL 



Los Gatos, Cal 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

strlotly first 
proprietor. 



Tents 

o AWNnNCft 
• • FL 

Camp Furniture 

AMES&HARRISjnc 




loo Sacram?ijt'o3r. 
San Francisco. 



3» 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1899. 




CALIFORNIA'S sturdy long-ago, with its young man- 
hood struggles and hardships, its heroically-borne 
privations, and its buoyant, radiant hopes, was vividly re- ' 
called to the mind of the aged multi-millionaire, Alvinza 
Hayward, a few days ago, by an unexpected meeting, as 
rare in its nature and as replete with interest as ever 
occurs in the course of a lifetime. The mining magnate sat 
at his desk in his downtown office, his mind occupied, no 
doubt, with the consideration of large affairs in the financial 
world, when the bell boy presented a card bearing the name, 
"P. McCaffery," along with the further information that 
the individual in question was "pure food inspector of the 
city of Boston." 

" Pure food inspector, eh?" murmured Alvinza. "Can't 
imagine what he wants. Show him in, anyhow." 

"' Remember me?" queried the stranger, a tall, slim, 
white-haired man, mild-faced and of dignified bearing. 
"Isn't the name half-way familiar?" 

"It is quite possible you have mistaken me for some 
other Hayward," remarked Alvinza, after cautiously 
studying bis visitor. "If I have met you before, I have 
certainly forgotten both your name and your face." 

"Well, it's not much wonder," quoth McCaffery. "It's 
forty-nine years since last we meet. I was one of a quartet 
of young, hardy prospectors on the American river in 
1850, and another member of the company was Alvinza 
Hayward.'' 

What — one of the original four?" ejaculated the mag- 
nate. His reserve was gone. His eyes looked welcome; 
his face beamed. The two advanced, by a common im- 
pulse, grasped each other by the hand, and then stood 
mute for a moment, their eyes filled with tears, their lips 
parted by inaudible laughter, born of the over-flowing 
heart. Then, on the wings of thought, they went back to 
1850, when both were moneyless and both had big-muscled 
arms, wore jumpers and jeans, carried picks and shovels, 
and operated cradles and sluices. 

At the close of 1850 the ways of these men parted. Mc- 
Caffery returned to his home in Boston, where, in the long 
lapse of time since then he has accumulated a modest 
fortune, though small, indeed, in comparison with that 
amassed by Hayward, whose name is connected with the 
biggest and most successful mining deals and enterprises 
in the gold-streaked history of the richest land under the 
sun. 

McCaffery accompanied Alvinza to the magnate's 
magnificent mansion at Menlo Park, and in the gorgeous 
dining hall, with its service of silver and gold — there, after 
some of the rarest of old wines had been sampled, the 
storied past was lived over again. 

The amiable Mrs. Hayward, who possesses a most re- 
tentive memory, recalled the American-river incident, as 
it were a scene of yesterday, and dwelt particularly on 
this chapter in the tale of pioneer times. The Hayward 
party (and McCaffery was a member of it) had crossed the 
river for a prospecting journey of several days, leaving 
the bulk of their stores cached behind them. When their 
supply of bard biscuit and bacon gave out, they turned 
back toward the river and the original camp. Meantime, 
the stream had become a roaring flood, and it was impos- 
sible to ford it. For fourteen days the treasure-hunters 
remained helpless there. Brown beans had become the 
only item on their bill of fare, and for two whole weeks 
they were restricted by fate to a diet of brown beans and 
water. 

♦ # # 

Captain Nicolle, of the British vessel Almora, who had 
a hard-luck story to tell on his arrival here from Ham- 
burg, was on change the other afternoon discussing ships 
and shipping with such notable authorities as Admiral Joe 
Hanna, Commodore Joe Jordan, Captain Gray, Captain 



Tyson, Meyer and Wilson and a few other celebrities, when 
he said : 

"I may have had a hard time and been in ill luck, but I 
never had such bad luck as the Captain of the Wynford, 
now in port." 

" How's that?" said Lieutenant McMillan, of the Hydro- 
graphic service. 

" It was this way : the Wynford was leaking badly when 
she got to the other side, and was put on the drydock to 
find the leak. They searched her from stem to stern, and 
blamed if they could find the leak. Still she leaked. The 
vessel had been laden with jute and mats, stuff that can 
fetch fire most easily, and by Jove, while they were pok- 
ing about with torches, lamps, or any other illuminant, 
they set fire to the Wynford, so instead of pumping her 
dry, they had to pump her full of water to prevent her 
being burned up. Now, isn't that a hard luck story?" 
And then Captain Tyson wanted to know whether the Cap- 
tain, who was intended for the West Coast of America and 
got to Rangum, Burma, instead through the fault of the 
agent, was not in harder luck. 
• » * 

Los Angeles' only dude, the brilliant and versatile Guy 
Barham, has not shown his splendifferous waistcoats in 
town recently. Mr. Barham, when up in Sacramento, 
was the admiration of all the pretty girls of the capital 
town. He described to them the delicacy of his undergar- 
ments, telling the sweet and innocent young things that 
tbey only cost $50 a suit. 

"Do you really, Mr. Barham, pay $50 for your under- 
neath things ?" Mark you, the Sacramento girls, or the 
girls that go to Sacramento during the Legislature, are 
modest in their expressions. 

"Oh, yes," said Guy airily, as he pityingly looked upon 
the verdant maiden. 

"My!" said a Colusa county girl, with liquid brown 
eyes, in whose deep pools dwelt innocence, also an acrid 
humor, " What swell garters you must wear." 

" I do," said Guy, with a blush. 

"They must be all gold, studded with diamonds, rubies 
and pearls." 

"Oh, no," returned Guy, "that would be quite vulgar. 
Mine are only plain gold. My friend, Mr. Garland, of 
Los Angeles — his are all gemmed with precious stone." 

" My, my ! — gold garters ?" 

"Yes." 

"I have never seen gold garters." 

"Never?" 

" Never," sighed the girl. 

" Wouldn't you like to see them?" 

" I would." 

And then Guy exposed a leg, oh, such a leg, while the 
country girls flocked around to see his gold garters. 

" Ain't he a chump," said they, afterward, " If I wanted 
to show my garters I'd have a warmer leg than that, you 
bet." 



That there is honor among thieves and sometimes gener- 
ous consideration among highwaymen is vouched for by 
Preacher Jeffries, who is chiefly distinguished by being the 
sire of the "World's Champion." 

On the last, or more correctly, the latest occasion when 
the Santa Maria stage was held up, after taking the money 
of his victims, the robber subjected one of the travelers 
to a close scrutiny. 

"Ain't you a preacher?" demanded the highwayman, 
ungrammatically. 

Father Jeffries confessed that he was. 

"Poor devil!" said the compassionate outlaw. "Here's 
your money back again. You need it more than I do. 
And say, here's another quarter for you. I always like to 
help the preachers." 

And he forced the dole into the trembling and reluctant 
hand of the itinerant evangelist. 
* * * 

The Scotch have a saying, "It's a far cry to Loch Awe." 
It is a popular belief that it is a far cry to heaven, but 
some of the busy and practical religious workers appar- 
ently do not think so. 

Apropos of this the Reverend Doctor E. S. Chapman 
tells a capital story at his own expense. He is at the 



July I, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



bead of a State temperance organization, called the Anti- 
Saloon League, or something of that sort. A few weeks 
ago, a municipal election was held in Berkeley, where the 
question of prohibition was the principal issue. During 
the campaign, Dr. Chapman directed the movement of the 
temperaDce forces, officiating as the commanding general 
largely by means of the telephone. So continually did he 
use the speaking tube and so constantly was the receiver 
in his hand, that it became second nature to him. 

Sitting down to breakfast one morning, he bent his head, 
according to bis reverent custom, to invoke the divine 
blessing. To the consternation of his household and to his 
own subsequent astonishment, he absent-mindedly began 
his petition with the familiar, "Hello!" 

* * # 

Next Tuesday is the Fourth of July, and while it is a 
time for patriotic display, it as well affords a fine oppor- 
tunity for the skillful activity of the housebreaker and 
the professional thief. To lock the doors and leave no one 
at home to protect property is no security against the 
professional housebreaker, who finds little difficulty in 
opening doors and raising windows. There are but two 
ways to circumvent the enterprising tbief. Either never 
leave home, or put silverware and jewelry in a safe de- 
posit vault. If you are going to the country for the sea- 
son, there is no safety in any other course. A box in the 
California Safe Deposit Company's vaults, corner of Cali- 
fornia and Montgomery streets, costs but a trifle and means 

absolute safety. 

* » * 

History frequently repeats itself in commercial affairs, 
as well as in other matters. Thirty years ago Beamish 
opened a store on Montgomery street, adjoining Piatt's 
Hall, where the Mills Building now stands. At that time 
Market street was a waste of sand, and Montgomery 
street was the fashionable promenade. In ten days Beam- 
ish will re-open his doors at 207 Montgomery street, di- 
rectly opposite from his old place, after thirty years. His 
new store is being handsomely fitted up, and a splendid 
stock of bright, new, and fashionable men's furnishing 
goods — neckwear, shirts, underwear, outing shirts, etc., 
will be displayed. 

ROEMEES Original Cafe, at 205 Kearny street, has 
been re-opened after havirjg been renovated and pre- 
pared for guests. The service is first-class, and the culi- 
nary department in charge of caterers of experience. 
The prices are moderate, and guests receive the most 
polite and prompt attention. Ladies who are down town 
shopping will find Roemer's a capital place to drop in for 
an ice, or luncheon, or full dinner. 

THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL. Dinner.— Sunday, July 2, 1899. 

Grape Fruit au Rum. 
Soup —'Team of Terrapin alaNaragausett: Consomme Adelina. 
Hors D'Oeuvres— Salted Almonds: Olives; Celery en Branone ; Cbow-Chow 
Fish.— Hoilen" Sea Bass, Sauoe Duperre; Pommes Rissole; Fried bake 

Tahoe Trout a la Meuniere; Sl>ced Cuoumbers. 
Boiled-Boiled Dupee Ham, S.iuce au Madeira. 
Entrees.— Chicken Liver Brochett • on 1 oast; Braised Calf's Sweetbreads 

aux Petits Pols; Spring Lamb Chops a la Maisond'or; Fried Bananas 

au Sucre . 
Roast —Prime Ribs of Beef au Jus ; Saddle of Southdown Mutton Currant 

Jelly; Stuffed Goose. Compote of Apples. Punch.— Lalla Roohh 
Vegetables.— naked, Boiled and Masbed 'otatoes: Boiled Rloe; Stewed 

Fresh Tomatoes; String Beans. Maitre d'Hotel; Asparagus, Sauce 

Pollandat«e 
Cold Meats.— Boned Suokling Pig a la Gelee; Roast Beef; Smoked 

Tongue ; Roast Turkey 
Salads— Lettuce; Chicory; Shrimp Mayonnaise; Romainne. 
Dessert— CupCustard au V-nila; Cherry Pie; Lemon Cream Pie; Straw- 
berry Shortcake; Coffee Ice Cream; Assorted Nuts. Cluster RRisiis, 

Assorted Cakes; American Cream. Edam and Roquefort Cheese ; Fruit 

in Season. Smyrna Figs, Tea and Coffee. 
Dishes not on this menu oau be ordered at restaurant prices 
Dinner, 6 to 8 P. M. R. H. WARFIELD & CO., Proprietors. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

No man glories in the fact that he is bald ; take warning in time if 
your scalp itches, it is just a reminder that you will sooner or later 
become bald. Use Smith's Dandruff Pomade, the only positive cure 
for itching scalp. 

See Rome and die. Drink Jackson's Napa S oda and live. 

C. A. MURDOGK X GO., Printers, 

No. 532 QUAY STREET, 8- F. 



ST. LAWRENCE- 



LIVERY AND 

SALES STABLE 

W. E. Bridge, Proprietor 

433 Post St., between Powell and Mason. 
San Franolsco. Telephone, No. 1S2J. 




Teteptaosa 

Main 190. 



BLAKE, MOFFIT & TOWNE 

Dealers In . . PflPER 



Blake, Mofflt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake. MoFall & Co.. Portland, Or. 



55, 57, 69, 81 First St 



WORTHINQTON AMES, 

member Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker in Stooks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities. 

138 Montgomery St., S. F. Tel. Black 2036. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Am. B. tlooper, Manager. 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate oomfort and 
attention. 

San Francisco 



HOTEL BARTHOLDI, 

THE very center of the olty, convenient to 
all the big stores and all places of amusement. 
Eubopban Pujs, tlJX) a day upwards. 
23d Street and Broadway, New York, 
(Opposite Madison Square Park). Rbed & Roblbb, Mgrs. 

HOTEL BELLA VI5TA A "■»«"" Ho ™ 

The Bella Vista is the Pioneer First-class 
Family Hotel of 8an Francisco. All the 
comforts of a modern residence. 
1001 Pine street MRS. DENVER, Proprietor 



POWELL 



Late with McNULTY. 



107 Geary St., S. F. 

Fine Shoes. 



Made to Order. 



LA GRANDE LAUNDRY, Telephone Bush IS. 

Principal offloe, 88 Powell St., opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch— 11 Taylor St.. near Golden Gate avenue. 

Laundry— Twelfth St., between Folsom and Howard Sts., San Franoisoo 



BeotiBsda 



For the Kidneys, Bladder, Indigestion. 

L- CAHEN & SON, Agents, 

418 Sacramento Street, S. F. 






Moet& 
Chcmdoii 



si 

* 

I 

\ (The largest and oldest champagne house in the world.) 

? ' IF 

$ White Seal (drand Cuvee) of exceptional ^ 

I bouquet and dryness. -Court journal. jjj. 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO, ff 

Paoiflo Coast Agents, (£ 
829 Market St., S. F. K 

i 



40 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

BANKING. 



July i, 1899. 




"You are full of beer, I tell you." "No sush thing, m-my 
love." "Well, let me hear you say 'satisfaction.' " "Thass 
dead easv. Listen. S-s-s-fax. S-s-s-fax. What was I 
t-tryin' to shay?" "Satisfaction." "N-no sush thing. I 
was tryin' to shay 'S-s-s fax'— thass name of boat that's 
bringin' back D-dreyfus. S-s-s-fax I Why-why don't you 
read th' papersh?"— Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

A Regular Customer.— Scene : Residence of one of our 
best-known doctors. Little Boy— Please, I want the 
doctor to come and see mother. Doctor's Servant— 
Doctor's out. Where do you come from? Little Boy — 
Whatl Don't you know me? Why, we deal with you— we 
had a baby from here last week. 

"Why don't you begin?" inquired the excited prize-fight 
patron. "The police," said the manager, hoarsely. "I 
don't see any here. You're not afraid of them, are you? 
"Not afraid! Why, they'd never forgive me if I started 
this show up before they got here. They want to see the 
whole business." 

Father and son out walking. Father (to son)— See that 
spider, my boy, spinning his web. Is it not wonderful? 
Do you reflect that, try as he may, no man could spin 
that web? Johnny— What of it? See me spin this top. 
Do you reflect that, try as he may, r.o spider could spin 
this top? 

"You are charged," said the court, "with rioting." 
"It's a mistake, judge," replied the prisoner. "Me and 
Bill decided to have a scientific boxing encounter, an' not 
havin' the price of a hall, we justpulledit off in the alley." 

"Some day," he said, " I shall leap to fame." "Well," 
she replied, "if the course you have pursued thus far is 
anything to judge by, fame will have to be below you 
when you leap to it."— Chicago Times-Herald. 

"At I understand it. an X-ray will go straight through 
a man's head. There is nothing quite so penetrating, is 
there?" "Ob, I don't know. Did you ever hear my 
daughter sing?" — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

"The first writing was done on stone," remarked the 
wise man at dinner. "Great gracious I Think of the post- 
age!" involuntarily exclaimed the rising poet, with a shud- 
der that rattled the dishes. 

Heard at the Hague. Hans (with newly acquired Eng- 
lish) — Vot vos going on down in the town I should not von- 
der? Fritz (emulatory)— I vos not know by goodness, so 
they tell me. 

Amateur Poet— How's this line of my Ode to My Sweet- 
heart: "Thy bright eyes outrival twin diamonds?" His 
Sister— Make it "Thy rivals shall eye thy twin diamonds" 
and she's yours forever. 

"it seems queer," remarked Fangle, "that while no 
animal wears a hat, there is only one that goes bear- 
headed." "What animal is that?" asked Mrs. Fangle, 
with deep interest. — Harlem Life. 

Mamma — Bobby, if you saw a man starving, would you 
give him a piece of your pie? Bobby— No'm. You said 
a person shouldn't eat pie on an empty stomach. 

She — How the ocean roars this morning. He — That's 
not the ocean you hear. It's the noise of the loud bathing 
suits on the beach. — Philadelphia North American. 

She— Do you think it possible that I'll attract attention 
in this bathing suit? He — Barely. — Cleveland Leader. 

"Thass th' fines' bishykle gash lamp I ever s-saw." 
" Idgiot I Thass th' m-moon ! " 

There is but one iesl in the city and that is the Maison Riche at 
the corner of Grant avenue and Geary street. Everything that the 
artistic gourmet can desire, served in the best French style, await 
the order of the guest at the Maison Kiche. 

No other water can touch 1 1— Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Bank 0? British Columbia. { ? a ? ^?X*S£Z!,?m 

Capital Paid Up 83,000,000 Reserve Fund $600,000 

HEAD OFFICE. 60 Lombabd Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson Rossi amd, Sandon, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This Bank transac ts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits reoelved. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of tbe world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon Its Head Office and Branches, and upon Its Agents, as follows : 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company oi 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon District, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby It Is prepared to issue 
drafts and Letters of Credit on that Bank at above point, and transact 
other banking business. Terms upon application. 

The ftnojo- Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 18,000,000 

Subscribed 8,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cob. Pine add Sansome Stb 
Head Oitice— 18 Austin Friars. London. E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & w. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bilU for eolleotlon, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART !„.,„,_ 

P. N. LILIENTHAL J «»n»*<>™ 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 
Jas. K Wilson, President. E. A. Brdguiere, Vice-President. 

Lewis I. Cowqill, Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital 1500,000 

Directors: Jas. K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pleroe Johnson, Geo. 
A.Pope, E. A. Bruguiere, John Barton, C. S.Benedict. 

Agents: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston — National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia — Drexel & 
Co. Chicago — Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Meohanlos' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Banes & Co. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San PrancisGO. 

38 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000 Paid-Dp Capital I 800,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY, Cashier JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President 

C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, O. G 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells. Fargo A Co., or Exohang 
on City Banks, Whenopenlng accounts send signature. 

SeGuritu Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 
LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L. Aboot Jr. H. a. Hewlett 

Wm. Baboook O.D.Baldwin E. J. MoOutohu. 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones R. H. Pease 

Continental Building & Loan Association of California. 

Established In 1880. 222 Sansome St., San Franolsoo, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital, $8,000,000 ProBt and Reserve Fund 1175,000 

Paid-in Capital - - - 1,3)0,000 Monthly lnoome, over - - 75,000 

Dr. Ed. E Hill, President. Capt. Oliver Eldridge, Vice-President. 
Wm. Corbin Secretary and General Manager. 

Grocker-Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post streets. 

Pald-Up Capital (1,000,000 

WM.H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vloe-Presldent 

GEO. w.KLINE Cashier 

W. GREGG Jr Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E. Brown, C. E. Green, G. W. 
Kline. Hy. J. Crocker. G. W. Scott. 

Germania Trust Go. of San FrancisGO sleeTl ? 6 '* 

Authorized Capital, 31,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, $375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Admlnlstra-or, Guardian, or Trustee. 
Chkck Accounts of Individuals, Firms aDd C> rporatious solicited. 

legal Ue- obitoby for money in Probate Court proceedings. Lntbbxst 
Paid on Trust Deposits and Savings. Investments carefully seleoted 
for our clients 

Board of Directors— Ernst A. Denioke. F. Kronenberg, J. O. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro, F. C. Siebe, Albert G. Wieland, H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H 
Brunner, 

Officers— Erhst A. Denioke, President, F. Kronenberg, Vice-p esldent 
H. Brunner, Cashier. 



July i, 1899. 




SAN* FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ARBUTUS — cm 4- west, in the ladies' world- 

■"HERE'S a gleam of spring in my dark old room 

And a breath of spring in the air, 
I cannot write and I cannot think, 

So 1 fling down my pen in despair. 
For my truant heart is out in the woods 

Still damp from the melted snows, 
Where the sweet wild things of the shadow hide 

And the trailing arbutus grows. 
I lay my head on my folded arms 

And drowsily shut my eyes. 
My dark old room whirls lightly away 

And the din of the city dies ; 
The long hard years of struggle and fret 

Of hope and despair and pain, 
Slipe from me silently one by one 

And I am a child again. 

'Tis spring in the country, and on the hills, 

In the secret places of gloom, 
Where the thick brown mosses cover the earth, 

The arbutus is all a-bloom, 
The children eager from school let out, 

Are oft' and away on its quest, 
Laden with baskets, sun-bonneted, tanned, 

And laughing with childish zest. 



Dear little flowers in the cracked blue jar, 

We are homesick, you and I, 
We fain would be back in the dear old spot 

If but long enough to die. 
Children we are of the woods and fields, 

Comrades of the wild and the free. 
And the city with all its confusion and glare, 

Was never for such as we. 



THE STORM WIND — from "under the beech tree,' 4 ar arlo bates- 

MESSRS- HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND CO , PUBLISHERS- 



Storm-wind of the mountain, speeding fleet 

From cloud-washed peak to cloud-washed peak I 

How free 
And strong and terrible thou art I The sea 

Bred thee in her vast womb, the offspring meet 

Of her supreme espousals with the heat 

And passion of the sky. Thy sire to thee 

Gave as thy dower all power, that thou shouldst be 

Monarch and lord where'er thy fierce wings beat. 

The forests at thy feet fall down in fear ; 

The fair frail mist-shapes cower in awful dread, 
Or shivering flee thy trumpet tones to hear ; 

But thou goest on unstayed, as God's voice sped 
Down chaos at the first, and sphere and sphere 

The rolling worlds to ordering be led. 

O wind implacable and stern as fate, 

Thou art the messenger of God, to cry 
The coursing of His chariot down the sky, 

His coming sure for which the angels wait. 

Bush on thy course like His consuming hate I 
Be like His flame omnipotent, and fly 
To make earth ready for His drawing nigh. 

In glory measureless and uncreate. 

Speed on the way ineffable and grand 1 

Be as the breath of God himself to purge 

From all uncleanness. Let no foul thing stand 
Affronting day 1 Sweep with resistless surge; 

And with thy mighty bosom cleanse the land, 
Till thy triumphant cry is evil's dirge! 



REACTION— CLARA BELLINGER BREEN, IN THE BOOKMAN- 



Not in heroic hours it is that courage fails, 
Not in the stress of strife the valiant spirit quails. 
Much more its strength is tried in the dread after hours. 
When deep despondency lays holds upon spent powers. 



4> 
MM! 



GRAY BROS., 



G oncrete and . . . 
Artificial Stone Work. 



2S8 Montgomery St., S. F. 

906 New High St.. Los Angoles. 



CITY STREET inPROVEMENT CO., 

FIFTH FLOOR MILLS BUILDING. S. F. 



Proprietors 

Bitumen nines. 

Santa Cruz and King City, 
Monterey County, Cat 



Contractors for all kinds 
of street work, bridges, 
and railway construc- 
tion, wharves, jetties 
and seawalls. 



BANKING. 



Bank of California, San Francisco. 

Capital, 13,000,000 Surplus, 11. 000.000 

Profit and Loss Account. January 1, 1899, $2,159,938 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP.. Vioe-Prea't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith.. Ass't Cashier 1 1. P. Moulton 2d Aaa't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N.B.A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— National Sbaw- 
mut Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. ST. Lonis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres. Berlin— Direotlon der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit Issued available In all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

632 California Street. 

Deposits, Jan. 1.1899 124,074,79" Reserve Fund H9H.265 

Paid-Up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 469,608 

E. B. POND, President W. O. B. Db FREMERY, Vloe-President 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. R. M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors : George W. Beaver, Thomas Magee, W. 0. B. de Fremery. Al- 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, George 
Tashelra, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Franolsco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms and 
Farming Lands In the Country. 

Receives Deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
In San Franclseo, Post Office or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt ct the money. 

No charge Is made for pass-book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours ; 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. , and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'olock. 

The German Savings and Loan Societu. 

No. 636 California Street, San Franolsco 
Guarantee capital and surplus.... $3 103,146 40 
Capital actually paid up In oash. . 1,000 000 00 

Deposits December 31, 1898 37,389,195 78 

BOARD OP DIRECTORS: President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-Presi- 
dent, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. 
R Sohmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George 
Tourny: Assistant Seoretary, A. H Muller; General Attorney, W. S. 
Goodfellow. 

Ign. Stelntaart, B. Ronte, H. B. Ruse, D. N. Walter, N. Ohland 
and John Lloyd. 

Wells Fargo & Co. Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansomb & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

H. L. Miller 2d Assistant Cashier 

Oash Capital and Surplus t0.26U.U00 

BRANCHES. 

N.Y. City.H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Ben]. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. MoCook, John 

Bermlngham. Dudley Evans. __^ 

London, Paris and American Bank. Limited. 

N.W. COB. Sansomb & Sdtter Sts. . 

Subscribed Capital (2,600,000 

Paid Up Capital •2,000,000 

ReserveFund « 850,000 

Head Omen i 40 Threadneedle Street, London, E.G. 

AGENTS— New York— Agenoy of the London, Paris, and Amerloan 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street^N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Frerei 
St Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissonlere. Draw direct on the prlnoipal cities of the 
world. Commeroial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

BIG. GREENEBAFW1 ........ 

O. ALTSOHUL |M«n»g«M. 



42 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS BETTER. 



July i, 1899. 



A GREAT ACTRESS. 



EDITOR News Letter : After a run of one hundred 
and sixty-three performances, the dramatic sensa- 
tion of the season has been withdrawn from the Garrick, 
and Zaza, who delighted New York's artistic senses, en- 
thralled the critics, and very certainly proclaimed Mrs. 
Leslie Carter to be an actress greater than any of ber 
American sisters, retires from the footlights — a memory 
of delight. In a long residence in New York, during which 
time I have seen all the plays and all the players worth 
seeing, I remember not one play nor a single actor who 
so cleanly stepped from twilight into the white glitter 
which proclaims and surrounds histrionic greatness as this 
slight woman. 

I remember very well it was on the evening of Monday, 
January 9th that Zaza was first presented; and I cannot 
forget the scene, indescribable, which followed the end of 
the fourth act. It was in the air then that upon the mar- 
gin of the American stage, and sweeping towards its cen- 
ter, had appeared a new star of the first magnitude. All 
the qualities of blood and heart, of emotion and absorbing 
mentality, were united in this wonderful creation. 

Zaza is a human play, which must appeal to every man 
and every woman who knows what life is. Take the sac- 
rifice, the restraining force of the re-created woman in the 
last act. It is something altogether different to the sac- 
rifice in Camille. In the latter case we have the sick 
woman, the consumptive, making a sacrifice, but in Zaza 
we have the woman in perfect health and in the zenith of 
her beauty putting aside the old love, the old desires, the 
old nature; and able for the sake of the truer love to say 
"no." Mrs. Carter discovers an adaptability to the try- 
ing character which shows its original repulsiveness, and 
by gradual processes rises superior to old conditions and 
strong youthful environments, and triumphs through the 
incentive of a pure love. The play teaches a lesson which 
the world may well pause, and study, and admire. 

There are nearly 30,000 words in the leading role, and 
how Mrs. Carter has endured the terrible drain upon her 
vital forces and retained a mental and physical brilliancy 
and poise has been a mystery to her fellow-craftsmen. She 
looks as fresh and fair as before she reached fame at a 
single step. To those who may feel the drag of social 
duties or the cost of hard mental and physical effort, her 
recipe is simplicity itself : Sleep. She retires punctually 
at 2 o'clock every morning and sleeps until 2 the following 
afternoon. Like Chamberlain, the eminent English states- 
man, Mrs. Carter takes very little exercise. 

Many critics say: "Ah what a Juliet she would make." 
But Mrs. Carter takes no interest in the fair Capulet, and 
does not believe she would make a success in the part. It 
is not unlikelv, however, that Mrs. Carter will appear 
later in The Winter's Tale, to be followed by other Shakes- 
pearean plays — if the Tale is successful. Perhaps too 
much Zaza for your San Francisco readers; but I hope 
some day you will have the opportunity of seeing her in 
this matchless creation. 

By the way, music lovers here are somewhat disturbed 
over the report that Jean de Reszke would not come to 
America this winter. But Grau says there is every prob- 
ability that the great tenor will be beard at the Metro- 
politan Theatre. Of course you Westerners will recall 
the fact that the gold-noted Jean took mortal offense at 
the reception he received in Chicago in 1897. His visit 
was a veritable frost, and he swore that he never would 
sing outside of New Yo-k again. San Francisco will get 
the Grau Opera Company, and it will be a good one; but 
the notes of the greatest living tenor will not delight the 
ears of the ten-dollar seats in the Mission-street opera 
house this year at least. Entre Nous. 

New York, Jun e 26, 1899. 

PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 

A Sovereign Remedy. One dose will stop a cough. It never fails. 
Try it. Price, 25 cents. Ueobge Dahlbekder & Co., 214 Kearny 
street. For sale by all druggists. 

B*D breath ! Bad taste ? No aopetite ? Bilious t Dyspepsia, sure I 
Baldwin's Dyspepsia ''apsules with Baldwin's Health Tablets— Immediate 
relief; permanent cure. Ferry Drug Store. 8 Market street. 



WHEN YOU RIDE YOUR WHEEL {WSM. 

len's Foot-Ease, 
a pr>wder for the feet. It keens your feet cool, prevents sweating feet and 
makes your endurance ten fold greater. Over one million wheel people are 
using Alien's Foot- (Case. They all praise it. It gives rest aod comfort to 
smarting hot, swollen aching feet, and Is a certain cure for logrowing 
nails. At all druggists and shoe sto*es,5ioe. Sample FREE by mail. Ad- 
dress Allen S. O lusted. Le Roy. N Y. ■ 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, oandy-maken, 
oanners. dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories 
■table men, tai-roofers, tanners, tailors, eto. 



When your head aches just ready to burst, that's where Jackson's Napa 
Soda comes in. 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St., S. F Tel. 5610. 

W63K M6I1 3(10 W0IH6I1 TERS, the great Mexican rem- 
edy; it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Mar- 
street. San Francisco. Send for circular 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the half year ending 
June 30. 1899, at the rate of three and eighty-four one hundredths (3 84) per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and three and twenty hundredths <8 SO) 
per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 
after Saturday, July 1, 1899. Dividends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of dividend as the principal from and after July I lt99. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, cor. Sutter, ban Francisco Cal. 

D1VDEND NOTICE. 
Oceanic Steamship Company. 
Dividend No. 94, Flftj cents per share, of the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany, will be payable at the office of the company, 327 Market street, on 
and after Saturday, July 1, le99 Transfer boofcs will close on Tuesday, 
June 27. 1899, at 3 o'clock p. m E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending with June 30, 1899, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four 4) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and three 
and one-third i3 l 3) per cent per annum on ordinary deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1. 1899 

GEO. TOTJRNY. Secretary. 

Office: £26 California street, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1890, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of three and six tenths (3 6) per cent per annum on all deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday July I, 18.(9. 

GEORGE R STORY, Cashier. 

Office: 33 Post street, San FranciFco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 30th of June, 1899, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate per annum of four per cent on term deposits and 
three and one-third (3%) per cent on ordinary deposits, free of taxes and 
payable on and after Saturday, July 1. 1899. LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Office: 532 California street, corner Webb, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California 

Has d-clared for the six months ending June 3U 1899, a dividend of 6 per 
cent per annum on ordinary deposits, 7 per cent on one i ear term deposits, 
10 per cert on Class *F M stock, and 14 per cent to Class "A" stock. 
Dr. ED E. HILL. President Capt. OLIVER ELDRIDGE 

WM. CORBIN, Secretary. Vice-President 

Office: 8S2 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of cne Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, June 2*, 189*. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one third (3%) per cent, per annum on all 
deposits for the six months ending June 30, 1899, free from all taxes, 
and payable on and after July 1, 1899. 
ROBERT J. TOBTN. Secretary. 

Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

HOME INSURANCE CO. OF NEW YORK asSMS™ 

H. L. Roff, General Agent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents. 

210 ban some St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well organized, competent, and experienced force of G em 
eral ind special agents resident Id the Pacifio t'oa-t Slates, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the in- 
suring public, and immediate Attention to the adjustment and Pay- 
ment op^LosseSj 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. | 

Capital Paid Op (1.000.000 

Total Assets 8702SOO 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,112,646 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 

COLIN M. BOYD. Iff SHSSSS 1SS& 



July I, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



INSURANCE 



THE widow of the late Geo. B. Rhoads will sue the 
street railway company, responsible for the death of 
her husband, for heavy damages. 

J. W. G. Cofran, Western manager of the Hartford, 
has been a sufferer from lumbago. 

Richmond. Va., is to have a new life company to be 
called the Washington, capitalized at $200,000, upon which 
dividends will be limited by the charter to 7 per cent. 

The Annual Convention of the National Association of 
Life Underwriters will take place at Buffalo, N. Y., on 
July 12-15. 

The agents of the Equitable Life Assurance Society will 
meet at the home office, New York, on July 24-25-26. 

Vice-President Dick will act as President of the Milwau- 
kee Mechanics until the annual meeting in January next. 

J. L. M. Shetterley and family are at Capitola for the 
summer. 

The Insurance Department of Oregon has ruled that all 
reinsurance contracts must be written within the State, 
under the provisions of the Resident Agency law. 

Ex- President Harrison now carries $150,000 insurance 
on his life. 

The Providence Life Insurance Company of Rhode Is- 
land, will be incorporated with $100,000 capital. 

F. G. Voss, United States manager of the Frankfort, 
returned from a visit to Europe this month. It is the in- 
tention to add several specially attractive features to the 
policies of the Frankfort, including the allowance of in- 
demnity for disability occasioned from sunstroke and freez- 
ing. 

The American Surety Company will not absorb the Na- 
tional Surety Company. 

THOSE who desire to get out of the city over the 
Fourth will have a fine opportunity to do so in many 
directions; but the California Northwestern Railway, 
lessee of the San Francisco & North Pacific Railway, has 
made a round-trip rate over its line which places at the 
pleasure of the public the delights of the most pictur- 
esque country trip at about one-half regular rates. The road 
runs through the finest fishing country in the State, and 
the round-trip tickets are good from July 1st until next 
Wednesday. A great many ladies are taking to the sport 
loved by Izaak Walton, and they frequently accompany 
their husbands and brothers and friends on fishing excur- 
sions. The California Northwestern's special rate, coupled 
with the fine trout streams which are near almost every 
station between San Rafael and Ukiah, offers a fine op- 
portunity for three days' sport. The train service is ex- 
cellent and the route truly a picturesque one. Full par- 
ticulars at the Tiburon ferry or 650 Market street. 

THE meeting at Oakland race track on July 4tb, under 
the direction of the Golden Gate Driving Association, 
promises to be very largely attended, and the raciDg the 
most interesting ever held by it. A very fine programme 
has been prepared. President John C. Kirkpatrick, Ed. 
Aigeltinger, F. Thompson, Cbas. Capp, and Chas. New- 
man have been especially active in making the arrange- 
ments, and are entitled to much credit for their vigorous 
efforts. The O'Kane Challenge Cup was shown at a meet- 
ing of the Directors held last Tuesday evening, ft is made 
of silver, of beautiful design, nine inches high, and properly 
inscribed. The officials of the meeting are: Judges, J. C. 
Kirkpatrick, T. J. Crowley, A. B. Patrick, and Mr. Lom- 
bard; starter, Budd Doble; marshal, Dr. Ira B. Dalzell; 
assistant marshal, Jack Martin; timers, James Chesley, 
Fred Vetter, and L. E. Clawson. 

Veey latest things in the art world are to be seen at Morris', 248 
Sutter street. New and artistic articles are continually arriving. 
Special attention given to framing. Sole agent for Moulton's cele- 
brated photographs. 

Insist Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 
Other Eastern Cities read over the Nickel Plate (N. Y C. &St. 
L. R. K.), the popular low-rate short line. Quick time, unexcelled 
accommodations, and no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adams, 
Pacifio CoaBt Passenger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal, 

~X Jaoluon's Napa Soda Lsmonade.is up to the Queen's' taste. 





MABTXr urn,* in *i».*u, 



Capita) Subscribed $4 462,760 

LONDON ASSURANCE. capital paid up 2,2*1.375 

Assots 19,105,148 

Capital Subscribed $5 000 OOO 

OCEAN MARINE. Capital Paid Dp 600.000 

Assets 2,502.060 

INSURANCE. 



FIRE. MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO OAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $0,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 489 California St., S. F. 

FlBllKSOBANCB. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. LIMITED 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 810 California St., S. F 

Founded A. D. 1702. 

Insurance Company of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PINK. 

Paid-up Capital 18,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6,022,0111 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1726, 

Capital Paid Up, $8,446,100. Assets, 128,879,850. 

Surplus to Policy Holders, 19,861 924. 

FRANK W DICKSON, Ass't Manager. 

501-603 Montgomery St., corner Sacramento. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY, °» «■»*■*"»>• 

Capital $5,000,000 

UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS. 
Office in company's building, 812 California street. 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager. 
Hooker &,Lent. City Agents, 14 Post street. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established m. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. incorporated m> 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents. 

418 California St., S.F. 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GERMANY 

Capital, $2,250,000 Assets. $10,984,248. 

Paolflo Coast Department : 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD* CO.; General manager!. 



44 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



July i, 1899. 



Southern Pacific Co.--Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
Main Line. Foot or Market Street.) 



Leave. I 



From June 25, 1899. 



I Arrive 



7:00 A 
7:00 a 
7:00 A 
7:»A 
R:0OA 
8:30A 


8:S0a 
8:30A 
»:U0A 

9:00 A 
9:0UA 


10:O0A 
11 00 a 

12:00 M 


•1:00 p 
8:00 P 
4:00 P 
4:00 P 


4:80 P 
4:30p 
5:u0p 


B SOP 
5:80 P 


6:30 P 
8:00P 
8:00 P 
•8:00 P 
7:00P 



(8:00 P 



Benlola. Suiaun, and Saoramento 6. 

Mary svllle, Oroville, and Redding, via Woodland 6 : 

Elmira, Vacavllle and Rumsey 8: 

Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calls toga, Santa Rosa 8 

Atlantic Express, Ogden and East S: 

San Jose. Llvermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placer- 

vllle, Marysvllle, Chlco, Red Bluff 4 

♦ Milton. O&kdale, and Sonora 4' 

Yosemlte Valley via Oakdale and Chinese — 4 

Haywards, N lies, and way Btatlons 11: 

Martinez Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton, Merced and Fresno.. 12 
Fresno, Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Demlng, 

El Paso, New Orleans, and East 0: 

Vallejo, Martinez, and way Btatlons 7 

Haywards, Niles, and way stations.. 2: 

Nties, Llvermore, Stockton, Saoramento, Mendota, Hanford, 

Visalla, Porterville 4, 

Sacramento River steamers *8 

Haywards, Nlles and way stations 5 

Martinez, San Ramon, vallejo, Napa, Callstoga. Santa Rosa 9: 
Benlola, Vacavllle, Saoramento, woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing. Marysvllle, Oroville 10: 

Niles, San Jose, and Stockton. 7: 

Yosemlte Sleeping Car for Ravmond 12; 

TbeOwl. Tracy, Fresno, Bakersfleld, Saugus for Santa 

Barbara, Los Angeles 9: 

Stookton, Mercea, Fresno 12; 

Martinez, Traoy, Mendota, Fresno, Mojave, and Los An- 
geles 

Santa Fe Route, AtlanticExpress, for Mojave and East — 6 

Chicago-San Francisco Special, Ogden and East 8 

Haywards, Nlles, and San Jose 7 

Vallejo 12 

Oregon Express, Saoramento, Marysvllle, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East 7 

Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations J10 



46 F 
46P 

45 P 

15 P 
46A 

:15P 
IBP 

:15p 
46A 

;1BP 

46 P 

46 P 
45 p 

15 P 
OOP 
:45P 
:15 a 

:45 a 
:15p 

:15P 

:45A 

:16p 

45 A 
:45P 

46 P 
46A 
:16P 

45 A 

50 P 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

J7 :45 A Santa Cruz Excursion for Santa Cruz and principal way sta- 
tions J8:05P 

8:16 A Newark, nenterville. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and. way stations — 6 :60 P 

*i:\b p Newark, Centerville, San Jose. New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:6Ua 

4:15p San Jose, Glenwood, and way Btatlons 9:20 A 

64 : 15 p Felton. Santa Cruz, and way stations — /9 :20 a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY, 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 
11:00 A. M., 11:00, *2:00, J3:00, *4:00, 15:00 and *6:00p. h. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *fl:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. m.; J12:00, *1:00, 
12:00, «8:00. 14:00 *5:00p. m. 

Coast division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 



*6:10 a Ocean View, South San Francisco . .. **: 

*7:0Ua San JoBeund waystaiions(New Almaden Wednesdays only) *8 
J7:80a Sunday Excursion for Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, and prin- 
cipal way s i ations J8 

9 :00 A San Jose, Tree Plnos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 

San Luis Obispo, Surf, Lomqoo, and principal way stations 4 

10:40 A San Jose and way stations 6: 

11 :80 a San Jose and way Btatlons 1 

•2:45 P San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara 
San Jose, Holllster. Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monteyey, and 

Pacific Grove «10 

•3:30 p San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, and Principal Way 

Stations *7 

•4 :15 P San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9 

•6:00 P San Jose and Principal Way Stations *8 

5 :80 p San Jose and principal way stations *9 

fl :80 p San Jose and way stations 5 

til :46p San Jose and way stations J7 



30 P 
.00 A 



:10* 
85 A 
:£0P 



89a 

:33P 
46 A 
Si A 
OOA 
:S0P 
:30P 





a for Morning, p for Afternoon. 'Sundays exoepted. tSaturdays only. 

tSundays only. 

6 Saturday and Sunday, f Sunday and Monday. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will oall for and oheok baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. J£Z?£?£££r 

For Alaskan ports. 10 A. H. June 5, 10, IS, 20, 26, SO, 
July 5; change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. C. ana Puget Sound Ports, 10 A. II., June 
6, 10, 15, 20, 26, SO. July 6 and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p. M., JuneS, 8, 13, 18, 
23, 28, July 2 and every filth day thereafter. 

For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports, 8 a. m. June 
1, 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 29, July 3 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford. Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. m., June 8, 7, 11, 15, 19, 28, 27, 
July l. and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Mexloan ports, 10 A. M.. 7th of eaoh month. 

For further Information obtain folder. 

The oompany reserves the right to change, without previous notloe, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 

GOODALL. PERKINS ft CO.. Gen. Agts. , 10 Market St.. San Francisco 

S S "Australia," Monday, July 3, 2 p. m. ( 
S S "Mariposa," Wednesday, July 12th, at 10 p m 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown 
South Afrloa. 

J. D. SPREOKELS &BROS. CO. 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight offloe, 327 
Market St., San Franolsco, 



California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TlBCROH FIRRY- Foot or MarketStreet. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:80,9:00, 11:00 ah; 12:85, 8:80 5:10, 8:30 p li. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 p H. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11 :80 P H. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:80, 11:00 A 11; 1:80, 8:80, 6:00, 6:20 PM. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10, 7:60 0:20, 11:10 AH; 12:46, 3:40,5:15PM. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6 :85 p H. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AH; 1:40, 8 '40,6 :C5, 6:26 P H. 
Between San Franolsco and Sohuetzen Park, same sohedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 


In Erreot Apr. 16, 1899. 


Arrive in S. F 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


DESTINATION. 


Sundays 

10:40 am 
6:C5pm 
7:86PM 


Week Days 


7:80 am 
8:80pm 
6:10 pm 


8:00AM 
9:30am 
6:00pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


8:40 ah 
10:26 AH 
6:20 PH 


7:80ah 




Fulton, Windsor, 
Healdsburg, Lytton, 
Geyservllle, Cloverdale 








8:00 AH 






8:80pm 


7:85 PM 


6:20 p H 


7:80 AM 
33JPM 


I 8:00 ah 


1 Hopland, Uklah 


7:86 PM 


10:25 AM 
6:20 PM 


7:80A m 
8:30pm 


8:00AM 


Guemevllle. 


7:86pm 


10:26 A H 
6:10 P H 


r? :80 AM 
6:10PM 


8:00 am 
5:00pm 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40 am 
8:C6pm 


8:40 A M 
6:20 P H 



7:80a 
3:80PM 



8:00AM 
5:00 pm 



Sebastopol. 



40 AH 
PM 



10:25 A H 
6:20 P M 



Stages oonneot at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sul- 
phur Springs; at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyservlllt for Skaggs' 
Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan Springs, 
Highland Springs, Kelsey vllle, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, 
and Bartlett Springs; at Uktah, for Vichy Springs. Saratoga Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Porno, 
Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside. Lierley's. Bucknell's Sanhedrin 
Heights. Hullville, Boonevillo Phllo, Christine Soda Springs. Navarro, 
Whitesboro, Albion. Little River, Orr's Springs, Mendocino City. Fort 
Bragg, Westport, Usal Wilms, Laytonville, Cummlngs, Bell's Springs, 
Harris. Olson's, Dyer. Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets atreduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronlole Building. 

H. C. WHITING. Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass . Agent. 



Santa Fe 
Route 



San Francisco to Chicago 
The Most Comfortable 
Way Across the . . . 
Continent. 



Every day in the year Pullman Palace and Pullman upholstered 
tourist cars leave Oakland mole for Chicago and the East. Take 
Market-street ferry at 5:30 p. M. Dining rooms are managed by Mr. 
Fred Harvey, and are perfect in every detail, serving meals at regu- 
lar hours and reasonable rates. No other line offers so many in- 
ducements as the Santa Fe route. 

San Francisco Ticket Office : 628 Market St. Tel. Main 1531. 
Oakland Office: 1118 Broadway. Sacramento Office: 201 J 
St. San Jose Office : 7 W Santa Clara St. 



Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p h., lor 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, 

oalling at Kobe (Hlogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 

Hongkong with steamers for India, eto. No oargo received on board on 

day of sailing 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Fridav. July 14, 1899 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Wednesday, August 9th, 1899 

DORIC (via Honolulu) Saturday. Sepiemotr 9, 1899 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Friday, September 20, 1899 

Round Trip tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Offloe, No. 421 Market street 

oorner First. D. D. STUBBS. General Manager. 

TOYO KISEN KAISHA Oriental S. S. Co. 

Steamers will leave wharf, corner First and Brannan streets, 1 p. m., for 
YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hlogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hong- 
kong with steamers for India, eto. No cargo received on board on day of 
sailing, 

NIPPON MAR U [via Honolulu! Tuesday, June 27 

AMERICAN MARU [via Honolulu! Sfttursday. July 22 

HONGKONG MARU [via Honolulu) Thursday. August 17 

Is IPPON MARU [ via Honolulu] Tuesday Sept. 1 

Round trip tickets at reduced rates. For freight and passage apply at 
Company's offloe, 421 Market street, oorner First. 

W. B. CURTIS. General Agent. 



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ESTABLISHED JULY 20, IBSt. 

9h H FRANCl« Co 



Annual .Wimffto. |< »> 




fiLTH 



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(!Mif a i*n t a 3li>Jbxrti sjcr. 




Pol. ZF/.V. 



&4JV FRANCISCO, JULY S. 1899. 



Number I. 



HE cigar dealer who declared war on tobacco trusts 
has signally triumphed by resorting to the cash sys- 



Printed and published etery Saturday by the proprietor, FREM MARRIOTT 
5H Kearny etreet, San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Poet- 
office a* Second-class Mailer. 

The office of the XSWS LETTER in Xeic Vort City it at Temple Court, 
{Geo. A. Kellogg, Baetern Repreeentatire}, where information may be 
obtained regarding tubecription and advertising rate*. 

All social items, announcement*, advertising, or other matter, intended for 
publication tn the current number of the NBWB LETTER, should be 
sent to this office not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 

SPAIN has decided to reduce her standing army. The 
reduction of her navv was accomplished a year ago. 

T 

tern. 

NOME is the new Mecca of the gold-hunter. It is a re- 
petition of the old story of marvellous finds and a 
mad rush of adventurers. Later, the tale of Nome will be: 
A few bonanza kings and a few thousand beggars. 

ELLA Wheeler Wilcox is opposed to the "flirtation 
book," in which the summer girl is supposed to write 
her experiences of the season. The clever little woman 
cannot brook the thought of myriad rivals to her "Poems 
of Passion." 

HARVARD'S late victory on the water wrests from 
New Haven the Inst laurel. Old Eli doesn't "get 
there" any more, and the crimson of Cambridge has come 
to represent the flush of success, while the blue of the 
conquered banner must be typical of the feeling at Yale. 

BY closing the gates of Great Bai rington against the 
vipers of the yellow press, millionaire Edward P. 
Searles has provoked a series of miserable attacks from 
the vile publications he had the manhood to rebuke. To 
be assailed from such a source, however, is loftier eulogy 
than purchased praise. 

LOS Angeles, clothed in radiant festal garb, is just now 
lavishing her smiles on the delegates to the National 
Educational Convention. The march of knowledge is upon 
her streets; her pavements are walks of learning; her 
halls, museums of variegated pedagogical rarities. Verily, 
for the nonce, she is a booksome beauty. 

KEN ye golf? Davie Stephenson bae come frae auld 
Scotia wi' a headfu' o' the knowledge seekit by kilted 
Hoot Mons o' the links — wi' the'r caddies, the'r gootta 
percha pellets, the'r cleeks an' the'r niblicks, an' the'r 
sticks wi' names I dinna ken. Nae end o' health t' ye, 
Davie, braw lad, and lang be't ere ye gang fraeamang us. 

THAT the exalted virtues of chivalry are to-day fos- 
tered in the California breast is proved by the verdict 
of justifiable homicide rendered by a coroner's jury in the 
case of a wife who made worm's meat of her husband for 
leaving ber sick and in want to squander his earnings on a 
sinful widow. 

THE Democratic National Committee will hold a formal 
session in Chicago on the 20th inst., for the purpose 
of considering matter relating to party organization and 
other pending questions of importance. It is to be hoped 
the leaders will see the wisdom and necessity of allowing 
dead issues to remain buried, and of uniting and marching 
out the whole strength of the party against the forces of 
imperialism, by which the existence of free government is 
menaced. 



IN rescinding their ill-considered resolution to impose a 
$20 head-tax on students of the State University, the 
Berkeley regents acted with a promptness that rescued 
them from drowning in a deluge of popular disapproval. 
From the bottom to the top, from kindergarten to moral 
philosophy, our State educational system must forever 
be kept free. 

DREYFUS is in France. The sensational stories which 
represented him as a man of shattered physique and 
infirm mind, old before his time, a young man with white 
hair, wrinkled brow and haggard face, had no foundation 
in fact. Dreyfus landed in his native country sound and 
hearty, as robust as ever, and looking no older than his 
years. 

THE decision to make no material change in the series 
of text books in use during the first half of the year is 
an evidence of sanity on the part of the Board of School 
Directors. It is gratifying, also, to observe that the mem- 
bers 6f the Board profited by a serious mistake of their 
predecessors in office, and on the question of text-books, 
acted in accordance with the expressed wishes of the prin- 
cipals and teachers. 

THE Oriental feature of Tuesday's parade was unique 
in the extreme, and unequaled in richness and splen- 
dor. In no other city of America could a similarly mag- 
nificent spectacle be produced. It was a picture of bright 
colors, of golden glitter, of a thousand glowing fancies, 
along with stage-flashes of China's heroic history. Replete 
with theatrical interest was the display of the children of 
the dragon. 

ftNEW JERSEY scientist has contracted the airship 
fever, and avers that he will shortly be skimming the 
etherial azure with his new-fangled machine. According 
to a memorable local precedent, when the next meteor 
shoots along the night sky, the reliable daily newspapers 
should teem with interviews obtained from parties suffi- 
ciently original to invent tales of "vo ; ces falling like stars 
from the upper blue," and ot a winged car with radiant 
headlight, bird-like speed and the buzz of electricity. 

GOTHAM'S suburban resorts have been invaded by the 
"kissing-bug," and Rose Coghlan's press agent has 
scooped the professional world by capturing the newspaper 
correspondents with the affective story that the expres- 
sive face of the distinguished actress had been positively 
disfigured for a period of twenty-four hours by the swell- 
ing which followed the insects' poisonous osculation. At- 
lantic summer resorts have suffered from a dearth of nov- 
elty, and there is sheer desperation in the attempt to dis- 
guise under a fanciful name the coarsely-affectionate Jer- 
sey mosquito. 

FROM Italy comes the report that the house of Savoy is 
tottering and that a son of Garibaldi is planning an 
alliance between the Catholics and Republicans for the 
purpose of overthrowing the monarchy and establishing a 
democracy on its ruins. Time was (anterior to the 
Christian era) when the Roman republic extended over all 
western Europe. It was republican Rome that wiped 
Carthage from the map. There is ample inspiration in the 
history of the Italian peninsula for a return to republican 
principles. King Humbert's government has long been 
in desperate financial straits, and it is not improbable 
that the days of Italian imperialism are numbered. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899. 



AVAILABILITY OF CARTER H. HARRISONr 



DESPITE the noisome administration of the War Depart- 
ment, which has received McKinley's approval by the 
retention of Alger in the Cabinet; the mephitic beef scan- 
dals, which have been accepted jocularly by the Presiden- 
tial entourage as an inevitable consequence of war; the glar- 
ingly, corrupt manipulation of the Naval Auxiliary Board, 
and the hopeless state of hypnotism in which Hanna, the 
Charcot of American politics, evidently has fixed his pro- 
tege in the White House, the Ohio syndicate will renom- 
inate their man for President. All political signs; all 
Eastern advices, point to the unanimous selection by the 
Republican Convention of McKinley as his own successor. 
His certain preference by the party is conceded as an ex- 
pediency of the Romanesque policies growing out of the 
Spanish war. Roosevelt's declination to enter the Presi- 
dential contest disposes of the only possible antagonist; it 
indicates clearly the happy entente established between 
Hanna and Piatt. McKinley's campaign will be a many- 
tuned appeal to the pride, patriotism, and — more potent 
still — the egotism of the nation. A'lied wealth will be his 
open champion and the pawnbroker of his votes. 

It is the fashion to sneer at Richard Croker because he 
has become wealthy and powerful as the head of the Tam- 
many tiger. It is plain to anyone familiar with our na- 
tional politics, however, that Croker, in his methods and 
successes, is merely less thinly disguised, on one side of the 
fence than Senator Piatt on the other. These two bosses 
represent the aligned forces in New York State, and New 
York has much to do with the fate of Presidential candi- 
dates. 

Piatt has re-accepted McKinley; strange as it may 
seem, Croker has gone to the other great Middle West 
State, Illinois, for a Democratic candidate. Although 
much secrecy enshrouds their relations, and although many 
denials have followed the circumstantial proofs of a sat- 
isfactory understanding, it is manifest that Croker is ex- 
ploiting Carter H. Harrison, the picturesque Mayor of 
Chicago, as the Democratic Presidential possibility. Be- 
fore going to Europe, Croker took a trip West to see Har- 
rison, and afterward spent two weeks at West Baden, 
Indiana, with a couple of Harrison's managers, one of 
whom was an old Tammany lieutenant in excellent stand- 
ing. 

That Croker has taken up Harrison as the Tammany 
candidate for the Presidency will not militate against the 
Chicagoan, either in the estimation of managing politi- 
cians or in the confidence of the voter. What Phelan is 
to San Francisco, Harrison is to Chicago, with the added 
distinction that the Mayor's |chair he occupies was filled 
by his father many terms — and by the act of neither was 
their name smirched. 

The elder Harrison, a Kentuckian, invested wisely in 
Chicago, and left his son a fortune. Unlike the blood- 
thirsty Roosevelt, Carter, Jr., never changed his residence 
to dodge taxes. Harrison, in other words, is a millionaire 
who has been willing always to confess as to his real and 
personal property and cheerfully pay his assessment. In fra- 
ternity and affiliation he stands very high. He graduated 
from Yale with honors. He knows how to write an essay 
or make a speech effectively. 

Better than all else, Harrison has a mild-eyed and rosy- 
cheeked courage that knows no compromise. During his 
first administration he had a boodle City Council to tight 
on one side and millionaire franchise-seekers on the other. 
Yerkes, then representing the Elkins-Widener syndicate 
of Philadelphia and New York, had bribed the majority of 
the Council to extend his street car franchises fifty years. 
Harrison made an open fight against the Council, organ- 
ized the wards against the corrupt aldermen, and defeated 
the measure. Then the Eastern capitalists, through the 
street car baron, turned their millions loose against him 
in his campaign for re-election, and contrived to bait Alt- 
geld into the arena as an independent antagonist. Bryan 
undertook to inject national politics into the struggle, and 
secretly sided with Altgeld. posing him as the real repre- 
sentative of the Chicago platform. Harrison easily tri- 
umphed over Yerkes, the powerful Council clique, Altgeld 
and the Bryan influence. 

In political strategy, Harrison has the gifts of his father. 
His record is clean as to fidelity in all that concerns the 



much-bruited Chicago platform. He has faithfully sup- 
ported it, 16 to 1 and all. He had been the staunch friend and 
ally of Bryan. But Bryan betrayed Harrison in his own home 
and made it easy for Croker to satisfy the Chicago man 
that the Nebraska politician was insincere. It is no longer 
any secret in the East that Bryan had an understanding 
with certain representatives of the money powers as to 
monetary legislation in the event of his election. That he 
stood ready to maintain the money policy of Wall street, 
no doubt any longer exists. For all these reasons, Harri- 
son may be regarded as the likeliest candidate of the Dem- 
ocracy against McKinley. It is the common belief that he 
would carry Illinois and New York, and whoever wins will 
have to carry these States. 

University President vs. President-elect Benjamin Ide 

University Figurehead. Wheeler of the State University 
has demanded (1) that the re- 
gents admit the president's right to make all appoint- 
ments in the faculty; (2) that the president be the sole 
medium of communication between the faculty and regents; 
(3) that the president be empowered to make all recom- 
mendations for promotions in the faculty and increase of 
salaries; (4) that the entire board shall abide by the de- 
cisions of a majority, and that factional disturbances 
cease. 

So bold and direct are these demands as to startle some 
of the regents, yet Professor Wheeler is eminently right. 
Should he undertake to administer the affairs of the uni- 
versity much will be expected of him, and he should not be 
hampered in his work. It is patent to all that for a de- 
cade past the bane of Berkeley has been a lack of adminis- 
trative force, and it is conceded, in the highest circles of 
the educational world, that Professor Wheeler is excep- 
tionally well qualified to raise this university up to the 
best Eastern standard. 

If political influence be permitted to figure in the choice 
of university instructors, or if university professorships be 
handled by the regents or others as piums of patronage, 
and character and efficiency be not made paramount con- 
siderations for election; if all members of the faculty have 
official voice before the regents, introducing confusion, 
destroying order, and comprehending the denial to the 
executive head of the institution of the single voice of 
authority in the premises; and'f recommendations for pro- 
motion in the faculty and for increase of salaries are not 
to come through the president, — then no ambitious edu- 
cator, with an established reputation, with progressive 
ideas and a vigorous manhood rich in promise, can afford 
to risk his name and fame as the powerless figurehead of 
Berkeley University. No ambitious educator, like Pro- 
fessor Benjamin Ide Wheeler, will accept an office where a 
great deal is expected and a very little made possible of 
accomplishment; where the limitations of authority make 
him helpless to do for the university those things which, 
left undone, will subject him to severest criticism. 

Let us have a State University President in fact, not 
merely in name; a president able to cope with and master 
the conditions that prevail at Berkeley. The regents will 
show their wisdom and their devotion to the best interests 
of the university by granting the demands of President- 
elect Benjamin Ide Wheeler. 

To Save Our Admitting, for the present, that there is 
Forests. as much in a policy of foreign expansion as 
its friends would like to make out, it will 
surely be conceded on all sides that there is equally as 
much in preserving the territory we have. This we are 
not doing by a great deal. Our splendid heritage of for- 
ests is rapidly decreasing and in a few years, at the pre- 
sent rate of destruction, will have entirely disappeared. 
Michigan, at one time the greatest of our lumber supply- 
ing States, is now almost denuded of forest trees, and the 
same thing is more or less true of the entire North West. 
We are so short of lumber in all that great region, that 
we want to practically annex the Canadian forests by gain- 
ing free access to them, without which we are not dis- 
posed to settle our little differences with Canada. Had 
we been duly mindful of how to preserve and renew our 
own grand gifts of nature, we need not now be casting 
covetous eyes upon those of our neighbor. The Pacific 
Coast is with astonishing rapidity being denuded of its 



July 8, 1899. 



■ NEWS LETTER 



noble pines, firs and other money producing trees. A well 
known citizen of San Francisco recently looked into this 
subject, during a trip as far North as Puget Sound, and 
■ice published an account of his observations. Mr. 
Wra. H. Mills, of whom we are speaking, shows that the 
work of destruction that is going on is truly lamentable, 
and that if something be not speedily done the days of our 
lumber trade are few in number, and this whilst the de- 
mands of the whole round of Pacific Ocean markets are in- 
creasing with leaps and bounds. No lumber man ought to 
be permitted to denude a single section of land without 
leaving it thoroughly planted with either seed or young 
trees, and it would be well to restrict the felling of trees 
to not more than one third of the whole in any one year. 
In this way such of our forests as still remain might be 
perpetuated. But more than this is needed. We should 
make amends for what we have already destroyed. Con- 
gress at its next session should grant a liberal appropria- 
tion for that purpose, and the surplus labor of the country 
should be promptly set to work to plant new forests in the 
place of the old. It appears that the Interior Depart- 
ment's division of forestry is instituting a scheme of in- 
struction for farmers and lumber men. But that will not 
meet the case at all. By the time the scheme of instruc- 
tion is fairly under way, the destruction will have been 
completed. This is a case for prompt and heroic treat- 
ment. 

Going The Dollar The desperate struggle that is to 
Limit One Better take place, at the coming election, to 
control the affairs of this city under 
the large powers granted by the New Charter, is causing 
things around the City Hall to work as they never did be- 
fore. The County Clerk's office is being turned inside out, 
and employees in all the departments, for whose employ- 
ment there is no authority of law, are being discharged. 
There will soon be no deputies paid for merely "walking 
around the block." The Assessor is finding values to tax 
that never appeared on the assessment roll before, and, 
as a consequence, the long promised dollar limit is now to 
be beaten out of sight. When the figures are all made up 
it is said that a rate of from 85 to 90 cents will be found to 
be sufficient. It is a mighty change, and the end is not 
yet. It is said that next year, when the economies of the 
New Charter are possible, a tax rate of 70 cents will be 
possible. If this prove true, the confidence inspired in the 
rate payers generally, will lead to a bond issue for per- 
manent improvements being approved, and a new era in 
Municipal Government will have set in. This, it must be 
confessed, is a very roseate view to take of things, but 
with the pace at which changes are being made, it is hard 
to say where we may stop. Personal property has been 
unearthed this year to the value of $31,000,000 greater 
than that of last year. It has, of course, always been 
known that personal property hid itself away and escaped 
taxation. It has not yet all been found, but will be got at, 
before long, if the officials keep up their present zeal in 
that direction. They will up to November, we are very 
sure, and after that comes a new regime whose action will 
almost wholly depend upon the kind of Mayor that is 
elected. If so much reform can be effected in anticipa- 
tion of the coming change, how much more may we not ob- 
tain when a sterling reformer is in the seat of power? On 
the other hand, what evil may not betide us if the Bosses 
in control of the baser elements in our midst, succeed in 
defeating reform and the reformer? The New Charter is 
either good or bad as that question may be determined. 

H. J. Crocker To The H. J. Crocker has it in mind to 
Reacue Of come to the relief of the vine 

The Grape Growera. growers of California, and pro- 
poses to do so in a very practical 
way. In a circular letter he has caused to be addressed to 
the viticulturists throughout the State he says he has be- 
come convinced their association for "mutual protection" 
is a failure and that other measures are necessary. He 
thinks that with the required capital and strong manage- 
ment, the wine making industry is capable of being 
developed into one of the most flourishing in the State. 
With a climate and soil in every way suited to the growth 
of the vine there is no reason why the industry should 
languish and die; which is the fate with which it is now 



threatened. It ought rather to progress with giant 
strides, and ultimately rival the output of France. With 
a view to starting it on the road to accomplish its natural 
possibilities, he says: "I propose to make an attempt to 
assure to the grape grower, a fixed price annually for his 
product and thus remove him from the uncertainties of a 
fluctuating market. The average price of grapes for the 
past ten years has been $10.50 per ton. With absolute 
control I feel such confidence in my ability to increase this 
value that I will pay you cash on delivery, at the rate of 
$14 per ton for all the standard varieties, and $12 per ton 
for Missions and Maloasias. Contracts will be made 
separately with each individual vine grower for seven 
years, and should I secure enough contracts to render the 
project feasible, I feel assured that the capital that has 
been interested in the success of the wine makers will 
gladly come forward, and that the result will be a benefit 
to all concerned." 

This, of course, means the creation of a great Trust to 
take hold of, and create something that does not now 
exist: namely, a successful and almost limitless wine in- 
dustry. Mr. Crocker makes offer for all the grapes that 
are grown and guarantees cash for them on delivery. For 
the next seven years he will pay one third more per ton 
for all the grapes that come to hand than they have 
realized during the past ten years. It is a plain, square 
business proposition. Mr. Crocker buys the grapes for 
cash; the making of the wine and the putting of it on the 
market will be the business of himself and his associates. 
He hints that the wholesale purchasers will join hands with 
him, and we presume that is really the basis of the Trust. 
With the resources he controls, there can be no doubt of 
Mr. Crocker's ability to make a success of the grand 
scheme which he so boldly undertakes. His project should 
impart new life into the drooping spirits of our vine grow- 
ers, and put the industry upon a stable basis for all time. 

The Columbia Versus Once again the world's greatest 
the Shamrock. yachting race is to be sailed, and 

even more than the usual interest 
is being taken in the question of supremacy. For more 
than twenty years we have kept the cup at home, outsail- 
ing and outpointing the Britishers every time, and the in- 
dications favor our doing the same thing again. The Col- 
umbia has so distinctly beaten the Defender, which won 
the race on the last occasion, that our cousins over the 
water must have very greatly increased their speed to 
come any way near winning. The Britishers, having orig- 
inally accepted the conditions under which the race is 
sailed, stand stubbornly by their bargain. But there are 
sailors, belonging to both countries, who say it is not quite 
as fair as it might be. They say that the yacht never has 
been, and never will be built, equal to the task of crossing 
the stormy Atlantic in safety, and then beat the best of 
"our skimming dishes" in smooth water and in tides that 
their commanders perfectly understand. It is also com- 
plained that the crowding of the ferry-boats and other 
craft usually take more wind out of their sails than out of 
those of their opponent. They say this condition could be 
prevented, as it is in the great yachting races off the Isle 
of Wight. If there be anything in these complaints it 
ought to be avoided as far as possible. There never can 
be anything in keen sportsmanship that is not believed to 
be equally fair on both sides. It should be remembered that 
we had to go to England to win the cup back, and that our 
yacht so badly beat the whole fleet that it was telegraphed 
that there was "no second in sight." But a great many 
years have come and gone since then, and if it would improve 
sport and increase good feeling all round , it would be well 
to let the contest take place in both waters, changing in 
alternate years. Englishmen spend their money freely in 
yacht building. Now let them have a show. 

CAPTAIN John M. Neall has been dismissed from 
the army. Unusual efforts were made to save him, 
but President McKinley evidently regarded his offense as 
incompatible with the conduct of an officer and a gentle- 
man and approved the finding of the court martial. Neall 
had and still has many friends in this city, who will regret 
that he has been dismissed. His previous record was ex- 
cellent, and it was felt by many that he should be given 
another chance. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899. 



Preparing Political Comparative quiet reigns in local 
Programmes. Republican politics. Now and then 
a bubble comes to the surface, but a 
breath of somebody's nostrils causes' it to collapse in short 
order. They do things smoothly in that camp. The rank 
and file will be united at the next municipal election, but 
that will not suffice, because, when all other things are 
equal, the Republicans are but a minority in this munici- 
pality. But the Democrats are split up into as many 
wings as there are feathers on a dove's breast. Some are 
for really good government, others are "out for the 
stuff" many, very many are on the make, others want 
offices, and others consider their claims for patronage 
good. Rival bosses are cutting each others throats, and 
the man who runs the party organ insists upon ruling or 
ruining. It is no longer true that the more quarreling the 
more Democrats, otherwise their chances of success would 
be superlatively bright. Yet the Democratic is the party 
most worth looking to. It is somewhat like the jingoes 
for: "It's got the men; it's got the ships, and, by jingo, 
it's got the money too." The non-office holding Republi- 
cans are tired of paying for the reform government they 
do not get, and will not "put up" this time. That meaDS 
short commons for the boys, who do not go the Republican 
ticket unless it is substantially backed. When they vote 
for love, they are Democrats to a boy. Then it is the 
good luck of the Democrats to have a candidate whom 
everybody wants for Mayor, and under the New Charter 
a one man power comes into existence, and Jas. D. Phelan 
is destined to be that man. Solid Republicans from all 
over the city make no secret of their intention to vote for 
him, because they believe he has proven himself to be the 
right man to put the new charter into operation. But 
may the Lord protect James D. Phelan, meanwhile! The 
bosses big and little, as well as the organ know that his 
election is assured, and each one of them wants to get on 
the "inside" with the sure thing. Among them, opposi- 
tion and rivalry will be carried to their extreme limit, and 
all for the purpose of basking in the smiles of the rising- 
sun. Bargains and dickers will be sought after but, we 
think, without much avail in this case. We are weli as- 
sured that if Mayor Phelan be but "saved from his friends," 
no harm will come to him from his enemies. 

The Discipline If anybody doubted that our county jail 
of our Jails lacked decency and discipline, the re- 
and Prisons, cent murderous fight between two of its 
guards over the favors of the Botkin 
murderess is well calculated to dispel it. It appears that 
guard McFarland passed most of his time in the company 
of Mrs. Botkin, did as he liked, and anybody who inter- 
fered with him was either removed to another position, 
compelled to resign, or beaten almost to death. Even the 
Superintendent of the institution could not resist this 
man's power, and resigned rather than continue responsi- 
ble for the doings of a man he had no power to dismiss. It 
appears that at last McFarland had. become conscious 
that he had been under the espionage of a fellow guard, 
and was so enraged that he used a black jack stick with 
such effect that the recovery of his fellow officer is still in 
doubt. What the Sheriff or the Board of Supervisors will 
do has not developed. What they ought to do a fool, though 
a wayfaring man, ought not to err therein. McFarland 
should lose the position he has done so much to disgrace, 
and be should forfeit for a considerable time that liberty 
for which he is no more fitted than the murderess with 
whom he has been consorting. The guards and custodians 
employed at the County Jail ought to be as trustworthy 
as the cashier of a bank. If they are not, they but cor- 
rupt that which they are employed to reform. It seems 
that Mrs. Botkin's days of mischief are not over yet. If 
she ever reaches San Quentin she will be heard from now 
and again. Curious things happen over there, but they 
do not leak out as they used to do, and because the authori- 
ties have found a way to get discharged prisoners inclined 
to talk beyond the reach of reporters. The secrets of our 
prisons need unfolding to the light, and it could be easily 
done, but our dailies have no use, as they imagine, for a 
prisoner after he is discharged or reformed. If they are 
as "smart" as they pretend, they could long ago have 
told the story of that infant that was found drowned in 
the prison sewer. 



What is the Matter How comes it that the lunatic 
with Agnews' Asylum? asylum at Agnews isso frequently 
the subject of scandal? Where 
there is so very much smoke there must be at least some 
fire. Only a short time ago, a young girl in her teens, 
while journeying on the cars to the home of her parents, 
was killed in order to hide the crime committed upon her 
whilst an inmate of Agnews Asylum. The officers, who 
ought to have invited investigation, evaded it in strange 
and inexplicable ways. The case never was pressed to a 
final or satisfactory conclusion. Now comes another out- 
rage about which the people around the institution have 
been instructed not to speak. Mrs. Wilhelmina Chaffers 
has been an inmate of the institution for about twelve 
years, and while not of sound mind, her delusions are quite 
harmless. She is 39 years of age, attractive and grace- 
ful. She has long been allowed considerable freedom, and 
is looked upon as one of the quietest of the patients. Some 
short time ago Mrs. Chaffers was taken ill, and an exam- 
ination disclosed her condition. Rumor had it that a 
trusty had been helping this unfortunate woman into a 
basement through a window that opens into the female 
recreation ground. Dr. J. R. Curnow, upon being inter- 
viewed, said: "The matter has been given no attention by 
the Board. It is one of those things which might happen 
in any large institution, and cannot be guarded against." 
Then why are the watchers nearly as numerous as the 
patients, and why are the buildings almost as well safe- 
guarded as a prison? There are many asylums in which 
such things can be and are prevented. If it were pot so, 
mixed asylums would be indefensible on any ground. As 
it is, the State takes away a poor woman's liberty who 
has been guilty of no crime, and whose weakness should 
secure her all necessary protection. To accomplish that 
end the State spends a lot of money. If it does not get 
what it pays for, then it is cheated and robbed, and be- 
comes itself criminal, if it does not take prompt measures 
to protect its wards. It may be said that this is a case in 
which the woman ought to have been able to protect 
herself. If that were true she ought not to have been con- 
fined in an asylum for the insane. If she were strong- 
minded enough to resist her keeper, she would be suffi- 
ciently sane to be set free, if only to serve as an example. 
If the crimes of Agnews asylum cannot be prevented, it 
would be well to ailot one or more of our asylums to women 
exclusively. Because this is a delicate subject it is avoided 
by the general public, but that only makes the Boards of 
Trustees all the more culpable for so acting as to compel 
even decent journals and good citizens to discuss matters 
from which they would naturally shrink. 



COLONEL Charles Sonntag, former State Prison 
Director, realizing the great importance to the manu- 
facturing and commercial interests of this State by the 
production of oil in California, has for a number of years 
interested himself in developing some of the fields in which 
oil is supposed to exist, and making a market for the oil 
already found. With this object in view, he visited Los 
Angeles several years ago, representing some large deal- 
ers in oil, and succeeded in having a part of the product 
of the wells of that city used in this city. He interested 
Eastern capital to go into Contra Costa County and drill 
there for oil. The prospects are excellent of finding oil in 
that county in the well now being drilled. 

Colonel Sonntag a short time ago made an extended trip 
through the Coalinga fields, and declares that the develop- 
ments there thus far, and the production of oil, have ex- 
ceeded all his expectations. He states that it is a wor- 
derful field, and he predicts the day is not far off when 
the output of oil in this State will exceed in value the pro- 
duction of gold and silver. He thinks the only danger lies 
in putting too high a figure on oil-bearing lands and thus 
scaring off possible investors. Capital is just now taking 
a deep interest in these lands, and with reasonable encour- 
agement large sums of money will be put into the develop- 
ment of this great industry. He says the oil-bearing 
strata run north-west and south-east, and are pretty well 
defined for twenty odd miles from Coalinga in Fresno 
County to Kern County. It is one of the most important 
finds that this State has had in many years. 

Jackson's Napa Soda leaves a good taste in the mouth.. 



July 8, 1899. 



SAN FRANC I \VS LETTKR. 



?£ VN X' 




THE atmosphere of Michigan seems to be great for 
breeding scandal. Alger comes from there, and he 
has bad enough to make most people turn gray: 
along comes the talk from the army post in that 
which waxes so fast and furious one can onlv. as the dail- 
ies put it, "wait developments," and meanwhile cogitate 
over how true the old axiom is about appearances being 
deceitful, for if ever there was a man of quiet, modest ex- 
terior, whom one would never suspect of being naughty, 
it is the "accused." Upon whom is it safe to bet? 

* « # 

The chances are that whatever results in the matri- 
monial line may be accomplished by our fashionable 
mammas and tbeir fair daughters will be beard from as 
eventuating in the quiet resorts "far from the madding 
crowd." Nothing is more conducive to sentiment than 
a moonlight night on a balcony — not of a swell place, but 
at some modest country place where a girl is not obliged 
by her constant change of toilet to keep in the man's mind 
how much of his salary those gowns would take up, and 
where the sans facun lazy existence lulls one into a sense 
of fancied security. The shrewd dame who has been such a 
capital Boss of dancing clubs, etc., knows this and has 
adopted that style for the campaign of this summer. 

* * * 

It is so long since a real live lord has been among us we 
are fain to make the best of the few baronets that have 
visited San Francisco of late. First and foremost is the 
ci-devant Lord Mayor or something, Alderman possibly, 
who was so kindly taken in tow by the St. Paul blonde and 
her people; then along comes another, who brings his 
wife. They too are wined and dined, and now we have 
had an Anglo-Indian and daughter for the title hunters to 
gush over, but the snobs are on the qui. vive, for the rumor 
goes that one of the Russian royal family is to pass through 
here incog., en route to the Orient, and every one knows 
how susceptible Russians are, besides being enormously 
rich, and, best of all, generous. 

* # * 

On dit, the old bachelor gossip of society will be found 
in close attendance of the pioneer family this year, with 
an occasional run to see the dowager at San Rafael, as in 
duty bound. Apropos of that little burg, what a thought- 
ful mother it is who provides the nicest girls she can find 

for her son's amusement in ride, drive, tennis, or dance. 

* # * 

The bridesmaids at the Ames wedding will have the un- 
usual advantage of a fresh crop of men imported from 
Boston for the occasion, who will act as ushers, and then, 
handsome Harrj- is to be one also, as well as Walter the 
wealthy, so take it all in all, those maids will have what 

might be called "a soft snap." 

* # * 

There is some gossip anent a dancing class which some 
of our swell set of girls are said to be forming for the pur- 
pose of training the raw recruit material which a cruel 
War Department has left at the disposal of our belles for 
army beaux, into shape for the cotillions of the winter 

ahead. 

* * * 

Talk about Little Egypt, the nude in art, and all that 
sort of chatter, why neither is "in it " with the beach at 
the Cliff of a warm day — the leg of the female form divine 
is to be seen there in all its variety, and not the leg alone, 
but "continuations" as well, long, short, thick, thin, all 
sorts to suit all tastes, are to be found in bare and un- 
blushing array. What a snap for a camera ! 

* * * 

The pretty dibwtante to be of next year is winning golden 
opinions at Del Monte by her sweet simplicity of demeanor 
and winning ways. She unites the dignity of her mother's 
family with the French grace and savor /aire of her father's 
side of the house. 

Regulate your eonduot ana your system by drinking JaoUson's Napa Soda 



The somewhat erratic young matron at a military post 

1 hundred miles from I hey say, tired of 

goodi -rn, and has resumed her lessons in all 

branches, riding, fencing (surely nut to boxing) from her 

soldier following. 

lit, the fine ball room in the fine residence in course 
of construction will be opened by a grand entertainment, 
the chief feature of which will be the hula-hula, danced by 
a band of natives especially imported from the Islands for 
the occasion. 

Prospective Mothers 
Preparatory Hints; Batbing; Clothing; Habits; Fresh Aii 
OOd Samtuer, elO : are some of the subjects treated in " Babies," 
a book toryoong mothers Bent free by Borden's Condensed Milk 
Co., N. Y., who nialce Gail Borden Ka^le lirand. 

Ponce de Leon would never have sought the fount or perpetual youth If 
be ti:»tl first discovert ,!arU«on's N'ana <n*n 



—J 



I College San Rafael 

I For Young Ladies. 



T Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic. * 

X Pull oolleglo course of studies. A boarding school of highest ■ 

j£ grade. Superb modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful • 

£ and commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. ' 

T » 

T t 

m Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley. 4 

«*> Unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Address, ■ 

% MOTHER SUPERIOR, j 

£, College San Rafael. San Rafael, Oat 

V I 



Irving Institute 



Select Boarding and Day 

School for young ladies 

2126 CALIFORNIA ST., S- F- 

Next session will begin August 7th Accredited to the Universities. 
Seminary and Full Conservatory of Music Primary Department for chil- 
dren. Carriage will call. For further information, address the Principal, 

REV. EDWARD B. CHURCH, A. M. 



rr* • »a. r» 1 1 [Founded 1876.] 

IrinitV SChOOl, 3300 Washington St. 

•* San Francisco. 

Boarding and Day School for Young Men and Boys 

Prepares for University and College; accredited with the Univer- 
sity of California and Leland Stanford University. A Faculty of 
eleven Professors and Teachers. Boarders limited to thirty-five. 
Christmas Term opens August 1st 

Rev. Dr. E. B. Spalding, Rector. 



H. J. STEWART, Mus. D. 

Has removed his Music Studio to 

1406 Van Ness Avenue, 
Between Bush and Fine. 

The Solly Walter School of Illustration 

Willre-open August 1st for the fall and winter term. 

26 O'Farrell St- 

PROF. WALTER WftTSON, &3„? m^cY^™! 

Lessons private, in class, or at your residence. 

417 ELLIS STREET, 3 F., CAL. 

San Francisco Dress-Cutting School, 

French tailor method taught. Full course of instruction in the 
art of Dressmaking. Patterns cut to order. Terms reasonable. 
Men and women teachers employed. 

202 GROVE ST- S. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899. 




" We obey no wana but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

THE Beggar Student at the Grand Opera House has 
filled that place nightly from pit to dame with appre- 
ciative audiences. It is a pity that Mr. Morosco cannot 
make an exception to his rule, and let The Beggar Student 
run for another week. It is a tuneful little opera; the 
libretto is well-knit and brilliant. The only fault I find 
with the English version is the prison-keeper's German 
dialect. It is wholly irrational, unnecessary, and offen- 
sive. Besides, the part is sufficiently humorous without 
" die Sunde Sprache "perpetrated by the translator. 

* * » 

We have seen and heard the Southwell Opera Company 
a little over three months, and we are far from being 
tired of them. In fact, we discover new charms in them 
every week. Take, for instance, little Daisy Thorn. Who 
would have thought that, beneath the prim little songs- 
tress, was hidden a very clever and charming soubrette ? 
But she is such, and has shown it most admirably in The 
Beggar Student. She played the ravenous, shabby-genteel 
Polish comtesse to perfection. Delamotta, too, was very 
good. His voice was never better, and his duet with 
Daisy Thorn in the first act was exceedingly well done. 
Wolff, of course, is unapproachable as a comedian. His 
singing, playing, and ready wit were a del'ght. Mr. 
Persse, who was The Beggar Student, sang well. His 
part is really not the chiefest of the play, but such oppor- 
tunities as he had he used to the best advantage. The 
Polish soldier march of the chorus was a work of art; the 
trim figures and their military precision were beautiful to 
behold. Prosperity in abundance has come to the Grand 
Opera House. The chairs, which had been removed after 
the Melba season, had to be put back. My friend Oliver 
Morosco drops his left eyelid in mock regret, as he says to 
the eager ticket buyer: "we're all sold out, down-stairs 
and the dress circle; try the upper gallery." Having had 
success with Mascagni's and Leoncavallo's operas, the 
audacious Moroscos are going to give Carmen next Mon- 
day, with Hattie Belle Ladd in the title role. By the way, 
I am told that she hit the East pretty hard as Carmen, 
and (if printed matter have claim to veracity), the East- 
ern critics hold her in very high regard. We shall see. 

* * * 

Shamuo O'Brien had its revival at the Tivoli, with Denis 
O'Sullivan as the leading man. But before I say much 
about part and parties of this really beautiful, though ex- 
ceedingly difficult opera, I must make a few remarks per- 
tinent to the issue. To one who has not been nursed on 
Shakespeare, Milton, and Tennyson, and who never learned 
that Shamus rhymes with famous, the first word of the 
Irish opera presents a puzzle in pronunciation. The average 
European unacquainted with English pronounces it Shammes 
If the said European happens to be of my own religious per- 
suasion, (but a trifle more orthodox) he wonders how 
there could have been a Shammes O'Brien. For a Shammes 
is the sexton of the synagogue and how can an O'Brien be 
a Shammes? Behind me, in the Tivoli, sat an orthodox 
friend of mine with his good wife. He had his spectacles 
on the point of his nose and was spelling the title of the 
Irish opera. After a bit the following dia'logue reached 
my ear : He — Is he a Jew? She — Who? He— De acter. 
She — I don't know. He — Veil, he must be a converted 
Christian. She — Vat make you tink? He — It says here 
on de paper Shammes O'Brien. If his name is O'Brien he 
is a Beitzemer (Irish), and if he is a Shammes, he became 
a Jew. The logic was irrefragable. 



To resume : With all due respect to the fine abilities of 
my friend O'Sullivan, I think him a trifle too stagy. Nor 
do I think very highly of his part. With the exception of 
the second act, where Shamus plays the village idiot to 
mislead the English soldiers, there is nothing particularly 
good, neither in the acting nor in the singing. Rys 
Thomas' part admits of much better work, and he did it 
very well. Particularly fine was his singing in the second 
act, and his mezzo voce reminded me of the incomparable 
Russo at the Alhambra. But by far the most difficult and 
at the same time most artistic part fell to Annie Meyers. 
Hers is practically the star part of the opera, and she in- 
fused into it such a wealth of action; and she sang with so 
much dash that one really regretted to have to listen to 
the others in the play. Her voice is full, warm, and very 
sympathetic. There are none of the screechy notes in her 
singing. She has also natural wit and cleverness, and she 
enters into her roles with full intelligence. Annie Meyers 
can always be relied on for effective work, and the Tivoli 
is fortunate in having so thorough and clever an artist. 

* * # 

I feel like unto Moses, when the voice from the burning 
bush told him that he stood on holy ground. Moses took 
off his shoes. But as that would not meet with occidental 
courtesy, I take off my hat to the principals of the Alham- 
bra Opera Company. Manon Lescaut was sung divinely. 
Melba might have listened to Repetto in the Barber of Se- 
ville with profit to herself. She certainly did not excel 
the little Italia, who is no beauty, but whose singing comes 
very near Patti in her early days. But the finest work 
was done by Miss Amelia Sostegni in Mignon. Sostegni 
has a powerful voice, clear as a bell, flexible as the finest 
silk. She sings without evident effort. A very clever 
actress she is in Mignon — Shepherdess and Bacchante all 
in one. The wealth of her fine blonde hair crowns her 
beautiful face like an aureole. I have never seen a better 
Mignon, and but seldom beheld similar passion so consum- 
ately portrayed. Then there is the matchless Parrari, the 
baritone, whose efforts in San Francisco have put into the 
shade even the indefatigable Bensaude, of the Ellis Opera 
Company. The heroic Badaracco, the ne pins ultra tenor of 
the Lambardis, deserves no less credit for his excellent 
work, his perfect enunciation, his power and passion. As for 
little Russo, his only fault is that he is a head too short for 
the great work he does. Nature gave him a glorious 
voice; a voice that is by turns soft, sweet, ringing and 
overwhelming. His command over his voice is masterful, 
perfect. And all the others of these great artists, who 
appear nightly and spend the gift of the gods before a 
handful of people. Alas, what barbarians we are, to be 
sure. We have matchless excellence at our door, and we 
take no heed. We let genius die and talent rot, and yet 
we are offended when some knowing people call our town 
a jay town. Are we? 

* * » 

L. R. Stockwell will finish to-night a week of excellent 
work at the California Theatre. Stockwell is a stocky, 
ruddy, jovial fellow, who never fails to interest an audi- 
ence, even in plays less fine than Hoyt's A Midnight Bell. 
But about the cleverest youngster on the stage is Gus 
Tate, who comes before the public as the 'typical school- 
boy, an Ishmaelite and a perfect tyro. I can promise him 
a great future; he is under the best tuition, and his mas- 
ter is L. R. Stockwell. Mr. Friedlander has made ar- 
rangements for another surprise. On Thursday, July 13th, 
the Frawleys, with Blanche Bates as leading lady, open 
at the California. Adolphe Danziger. 

Shamus O'Brien, which has proved a great success at 
the Tivoli, will be seen for the last time next Wednesday 
evening. On Thursday evening Bluebeard will be put on 
with Miss Ada Walker, a noted Australian soprano, as 
Fatima. The opera will be be beautifully staged, and the 
full strength of the Tivoli Company will be in the cast. 

* * * 

Next week's offering at the Grand Opera House will 
come in the nature of a surprise to the musically inclined 
public of this city. It is none other than the ever-welcome 
grand opera Carmen, with newly-painted scenery, cos- 
tumes and accessories, and a cast that will be next to per- 
fect. 



July 8, 1899. 



SAN FRANV \vs l.i;! 




Blanch* Sate*. 



Next Thursday evening. July 13th, 
T. Daniel Frawley will open th< 
fornia Theatre under the manage- 
ment of Mr. Friedlander. The en- 
gagement of the Frawleys is for but 
I'm- weeks and a half. The Company 
will first present Augustin I 
play. The Lout Word. Blanche Bates 
is with the company. Since leaving 
this city Miss Bates has won notable 
success, and her reappearance will 
be greeted by a large number of the 
most fashionable people of the city. 
On the 17th The Last Word will give 
place to Tht Dancing Girl. 

At the Columbia next Monday .Mr. 
Miller presents R. C. Carton's famous 
comedy, Lord and Lid;/ Algy, which 
comes with the stamp of approval of 
all the New York critics, and the 
credit of a long run at the Empire 
Theatre this season. In fact, its 
success has been so great that 
Charles Frohman has decided to place 
it upon the Empire stage again next 
season instead of a new play. It was 
only taken off, after many continuations, to make room 
for the long contemplated revival of Romeo and Juliet, by 
Maude Adams. The production at the Columbia will be 
the first of the play outside of the Empire Theatre, New 
York, where it was a big money-maker for Charles Froh- 
man all season. 

Only The Master Shall Blame and Don Caesar De Bazan 
has done a good week's business at the Alcazar this week 
and both plays have been most excellently presented; their 
last presentation will be given to-morrow evening to what 
promises to be standing room only. 

For the week beginning Monday next Camille will be 
revived by special request, and the many friends of that 
clever little actress Miss Florence Roberts will have an- 
other opportunity to see her portray Matilda Heron's 
adaptation from tbe French with interpretations from 
Miss Heron's own conception of the role in 1865 at Maguire's 
theatre, when Frank Mayo was her Armaud Duval. There 
has been dozens of Camilles on our San Francisco stage and 
each have had their admirers; there has been Lucille 
Western, Charlotte Thompson, May Howard, Modjeska, 
Rose Eytinge, Jeffreys Lewis, Clara Morris, Augusta 
Dargon, Rose Wood, Jane Hading and Sarah Bernhardt. 
A year ago a new star bidding for fame in that role ap- 
peared in the horizon; 'twas Florence Roberts; she gave 
us quite a different Camille from the others and one that 
was original and acceptable. It is she who will again 
shine in that ungrateful role next week at the Alcazar, and 
this time her Armand will be the handsome and proficient 
White Whittlesey, the other members of the Alcazar 
stock supporting. Romeo and Juliet will be the attrac- 
tion to follow when Camille will have had its run and been 
again assigned to the play-book. 

The new people at the Orpheum include Miss Minnie 
Palmer, the famous comedienne who appears in a comedy 
sketch entitled "Rose Pompon." She is assisted by Mr. 
Francis Gerard of the Haymarket Theatre, London. 
George Wilson, the black-face comedian who was so long 
identified with the Primrose and West Minstrels; the Rex- 
fords, the European acrobats, and Milliau and Shields. 
comedians. The hold-overs include Hayes and Lytton, 
Morie, Gardner Brothers and the Farrells. Matinees, 
Wednesday, Satu rday and Sunday. 

Champagne Imports In 1898 
Aggregated 242,319 cases, of which 86,855 cases were G. H. Mumm's 
Extra Dry, the acme of perfection. Bottles will bear green neck- 
band and star label. 

Independence Days may come and Independence Days may go, 
but the fame and the drinking of J. F. Cutter and Argonaut 
Whiskeys go on forever and forever in larger quantities. The best 
liquors on earth. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, sole agents 
for the United States. 

B»d BHEATHf Bad taste ? No appetite? Bilious f Dyspepsia, sure I 
Baldwin's Dyspepsia Capsules, with Balu win's Health Tablets— immediate 
relief; permanent cur e. Ferry Drug Store. 8 Market street. 

That oold bottle and a hot bird immortalized by Eugene Field are all 
very well in their way; butyour steady beverage should be Napa Soda. 



Columbia Theatre. " ,,,,ob - ""ZAS. .*. m™..-.. 

Fifth week of the«c*ion brglnn Monday night, oo which ooculoo 

HENRY MILLER 

and 
ft SPECIAL COMPANY 
will present for thn fl'M lime lo lbt| country ouUldo of New 
York City the great »tre succcsi 

LORD AND LftDY ALQY. 
by R C Carton, author of "Liberty Ha11."o<o. 



California Theatre. 



S. H. FlUKW.tllUEK. 



Malinger. 
Commencing 



Llmticd ennafrenient of five weeks nod a half. 
Thuisday ct< nit g. July )3th. 

THE FRAWLEY COMPANY 

AND BLANCHE BATES, with a coterie or experienced 
players. Thursday. Friday, and Saturday nights, and Satur- 
day matinee, the late Augustln Daly's best play, The Last 
Word. Reserved seats, 25c., Wo,, no*, and II. 
July l*th: Blanche Bates la The Dancing Girl. 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Week of July 10th. 



Fred Belasco, Lessee. Mark Thall, 
Manager. 'Phone Main 2M. 

GAMILLE. 

Florence Roberts as Camille, White Whittlesey as armand 
Duval, Aic tzar company supporting. Special stage effeots 
and handsome wardrobes. 
Alcazai prices: 15c. 25c, 33c , .Vc 
In preparation, Romeo and Juliet. 



Grand Opera Mouse. 



Morosco Amusement Co., Ino., 

Lessees. 



Last two nights of THE BEGGAR STUDENT, 
Commencing Monday, July Kith, elaborate production of Bizet's 
famous opera, 

GARMEN. 

Our new prices— Orchestra, reserved. 35 and 50o. ; Dress Circle, 
reserved 3ftc.; Family Circle, reserved. 15c; GuJlery, lOo. 
Matioee Saturday Best reserved seat in house, 25o ; Family 
circle, i5o ; gallery, 10c Te epho e, Main 532. Branch box 
office just inside of main entrance of Emporium. 



Tivoli Opera House- 



Orpheum. 



Mrs. Ernestine Krelino, 

Proprietor and Manager. 

Last times of Dennis O'Sullivan in the romantic opera, 
Shamus O'Brien. 
Next Thursday night, 

BLUEBEARD. 

An uaequaled cast; enlarged chorus ; magnificent scenery. 

Matinee Saturday at 2 o'clock. 

Popular Prloes : 25o. aud 5Uo. Our telephone. Bush 0. 

San Francisco's Greatest Muslo Hall. O'Farrell St. 
between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Sunday July 9th. 

MISS MINNIE PALMER, 

The world-famous compdifnne, assisted by Mr. Francis Jer- 
rard of Him Huym it liet Theatre, London, in the great one-act 
oon edy "Rose Pomp-m": George Wilson, the greaiestof mono- 
logue artists; The Kixfords. ucrobats: Max Mllllan & shields, 
com'diaas; Hayes & Lytton; Morie; Gardner Brothers; The 
Farrells. 

Reserved seats 25c; balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats 
50c. Matinees Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. 



Golden Gate 
GlotHing Renovatoru 



J. FlSHEL. 



No, 9 Geary St., Room 
Telephone, Red 3721. 



16 



Suits Cleaned and Pressed 
while you wait . 



$1.00 



Pants to order $4 UP Suits called for and deliver ed free. Send postal 

SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION, DELSARTE, AND VOICE CULTURE. 

Acting and Stage Technique. Course of 75 lessons, 850. 
Zoe Rice, 704 Post street, San Francisco. 



Moet& 
Cfrandort 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO, 

Pacific Coast Agents, 
329 Market St., S. F. 



(The largest and oldest champagne house in the world.) 

y 
White Seal (Grand Cuvee) of exceptional 

bouquet and dryness. —Court Journal. 



I 

I 



yv^^^M^^^*-*-^^-*-*-^*^^*^*^^**-*^^ 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 8, 1899. 



SUBJECT RAGES. 



EDITOR News Letter, Sir: — Sturdee, who during re- 
cent hostilities shelled and burned Samoan villages in 
which were only inoffensive old men, women and children, 
said: "Well we were out here in this beastly, God-for- 
saken country, and we had to have fun to keep alive. " 
This gives some idea of the character of the officer of an 
English warship sent to Samoa, presumably to enforce 
law and order and teach the ignorant natives something of 
civilization. 

So gallant a soldier as General Funston has recently ex- 
pressed himself very harshly, arrogantly, regarding the 
Filipinos, — and General H. G. Otis is reported in the press 
of June 30th as follows, being asked if he considered the 
Filipinos capable of self-government he replied: 

"In their present state I do not believe the Filipinos 
are capable of self-government. If the restraint and con- 
trol of this government were withdrawn from them now I 
believe they would be at each other's throats in a very 
short time and make a farce of self-government." 

Is it reasonable or fair to the Filipinos or Cubans to 
judge them to be incapable of an iedependent existence, 
because, in the opinion of some they might not at once es- 
tablish and maintain a strong and stable government? 
We are judging them without having given them an op- 
portunity to demonstrate their capacity for self-govern- 
ment. As a matter of fact all the indications are that 
they would make a success of administering their own 
affairs — especially the Filipinos, who, Admiral Dewey says, 
are superior to the Cubans. 

On the 27th of June, 1898, Admiral Dewey sent the 
following to the Secretary of the Navy: 

"Aguinaldo, insurgent leader, with 13 of his staff, 
arrived May 19th by permission, on the Nashan. 
I have given him to understand that I consider insurgents 
as friends, being opposed to a common enemy. He has 
gone to attend a meeting of insurgent leaders for the pur- 
pose of forming a civil government. In my opinion these 
people are far superior in their intelligence and more 
capable of self-government than the natives of Cuba; and 
I am familiar with both races.'' 

When the American colonies had thrown off the rule of 
England by the treaty of 1783, the capacity of the people 
for self-government had yet to be demonstrated. It is a 
mistake to assume that our ancestors immediately devel- 
oped national stability or strong administrative ability. 
On the contrary, for several years after their independ- 
ence had been acknowledged affairs in this country drifted 
steadily toward anarchy, and the government finally be- 
came so feeble that it was nowhere regarded with respect. 
A careful reading of History, particularly McMasters, 
might open the eyes of Americans as to what our people 
were one hundred and twenty five years ago. I doubt if 
previous to revolutionary times there were as many edu- 
cated people throughout our country as there are at pre- 
sent among the Filipino patriots, for these people cer- 
tainly have profited by the instructions of the friars and 
the Spanish civilization in their cities. This being so, why 
should they not be able to administer their own affairs as 
well as our forefathers did those of the American republic 
in its infancy? In our own case the strong and stable 
government did not materialize for some years after peace 
had been declared, yet it finally came because of that very 
period of demoralization which our ancestors had ex- 
perienced. And this same rule has been exemplified in 
the Republic of Mexico. That people learned to walk, 
after many a tripping and fall, by continued effort. The 
Filipinos might accomplish the same thing with less effort. 
Now that we are become such a proud and haughty 
nation, it is well to recall that painful and humiliating ex- 
perience in the first stages of our national life. A well 
known author has written of the period after the Revolu- 
tion: 

" As soon as the pressure of war was removed, the 
symptoms of disintegration grew alarmingly worse. Con- 
gress had become a mere rump, without dignity, without 
power, and without a home. It was compelled to appeal 
repeatedly to the States before it could obtain a quorum 
of members to ratify the treaty of peace. Many of the 
States refused or neglected to pay even their allotted 
shares of interest upon the public debt, and there was no 



power in CoDgress to compel payment. Eighteen months 
were required to collect only one-fitth of the taxes assigned 
to the States in 1783. The national credit became worth- 
less. Foreign nations refused to make commercial treat- 
ies with the United States, preferring a condition of 
affairs in which they could lay any desired burden upon 
American commerce, without fear of retaliation by an 
impotent Congress. The national standing army had 
dwindled to a corps of 80 men. In 1785 Algiers having 
declared war against the United States, Congress recom- 
mended the building of five 40-gun ships of war. Congress 
had only power to recommend. The ships were not built, 
and the Algerines were permitted to prey on American 
commerce with impunity. England still refused to carry 
out the treaty of 1783, or to send a minister to the United 
States. The federal government, in short, was despised 
abroad and disobeyed at home." 

And that condition of affairs lasted several years. It 
was not until 1787 that the constitutional convention con- 
vened which rescued America from anarchy. 

We may therefore assume that Cuba and the Philippines 
should be allowed to get on their feet and make an effort 
to walk. Let tbem at least have as long a trial in self- 
government before adjudging them incapable as the 
United States had but little more than a century ago. 

John J. Valentine. 

San Francisco, July 1, 1899. 

At the Maison Riche, corner Geary street and Grant avenue, 
champagne is reduced to $4 per quart and pints $2. Gentlemen can 
have mercantile lunch from 11 to 2 o'clock in private rooms without 
extra charge. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 

those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

San FrantiSGO 



A/m, B. flooper, Manager. 



HOTEL BARTHOLDI, 

THE very center of the city, convenient to 
all the big stores and all places of amusement. 
European Plan, $1.00 a day upwards. 
23d Street and Broadway, New York, 

(Opposite Madison Square Park). Reed & Roblee, Mgrs. 

HOTEL BELLA VISTA A *i™*<™>* hotel 

The Bella Vista is the Pioneer First-class 
Family Hotel of San Francisco. All the 
comforts of a modern residence. 

MRS. DENVER, Proprietor 



1001 Pine street 



LA GRANDE LAUNDRY, Telephone Bush 12. 

Principal office, 83 Powell St., opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch— 11 Taylor St.. near Golden Gate avenue. 

Laundry— Twelfth St., between Folsom and Howard Sts.. San Franclsoo 



ELECTRIC laundry is our name, 
Linen we clean, make 
Each article so bright and clean 
Can see your face in polished sheen. 
To catch us quick by telephone 
Ring up our call, South 231. 
In all our work we aim to please, 
Can do so with the greatest ease. 
Let him who well deserves high praise 
And does his best in all his days, 
Unite with all good men and true, 
Nor fail to give each one his due. 
Do this and we will keep you clean, 
Rinse from your conscience all things mean, 
You surely want thus to be seen. 

ELECTRIC LAUNDRY CO., 835 PoLSOM St. 



July 8, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




He.. 

lUtm 



The Bre.k-Up Lord Charles Beresford's report to the 
of China. Associated Chambers of Commerce of 
Great Britain, consisting mainly of inter- 
views with Chinese officials and foreigners, statistics, some 
of which are no longer very up-to-date, and a mass of in- 
formation connected with trade in China, has been put 
into book form under the title, " The Break-Up of China." 
In it Lord Beresford endeavors to give an account of its 
present commerce, currency, waterways, armies, rail- 
ways, politics, and future prospects. Arriving in Hong- 
kong in September 1898, and leaving Shanghai in January 
1899, he visited those places in China where British com- 
munities reside, convening meetings wherever there was a 
Chamber of Commerce, and obtaining the opinions o) its 
members. Lord Beresford also inspected a great portion 
of the military force of China, visited the forts, arsenals, 
naval and military schools, the ships of the Chinese fleets, 
and the dockyard. " The trading interests of Japan and 
the United States being identical with those of Great 
Britain, with regard to the future development of trade 
with China," writes Lord Beresford, "I traveled home 
through those two countries in order to obtain the opin- 
ions of the various Chambers of Commerce on this impor- 
tant matter." Lord Charles' visit to China was in no 
sense official, as he was merely the representative of the 
Associated Chambers of Commerce of the United King- 
dom; still, he declares that he found it absolutely impossi- 
ble to ignore political issues, so closely are commercial 
and political questions interwoven in the Far East. It 
would seem that Sir Charles went forth to see all that was 
to be seen, and, whilst he disavows for bis countrymen 
any desire for territorial expansion, and states that in- 
vestigations on the spot have convinced him that the 
maintenance of the Chinese Empire is essential to the 
honor as well as the interests of the Anglo-Saxon race, 
and that a decided stand must be taken against the en- 
croachments of Russia upon China, the British Govern- 
ment, meanwhile, is entering into an agreement with Rus- 
sia which bodes no good to an empire of four hundred mil- 
lions of people — the break-up of which, the writer says, 
" is an event that has no parallel in history." The opinion 
of Lord Charles Beresford, Member of Parliament, British 
statesman and officer, based upon interviews with the 
great Chinese Viceroys, the famous Tsung-li-Yamen r the 
escaped reformer, Kang Yu Wei, and others, contained 
in this volume of five hundred pages, with maps and tables, 
will be read with interest by those who desire to know 
something of the relative merits of the " Open Door " and 
the "Sphere of Influence " controversy. 

The Break-up of China : by Lord Charles Beresford. Harper & Bros., Pub- 
lishers. New York & London. For sale by Payot, Upham & Co. Price, 
$3 00 

Social Phases Mr. Samuel T. Dutton, Superintendent of 
of Education. Schools at Brookline, Mass., has gathered 
together and issued in book form, from 
lectures delivered by him during the last two years at 
Harvard, Chicago, and Boston Universities, and from 
papers read before the American Social Science and the 
National Educational Associations, ten essays worthy of 
consideration by parents as well as by teachers. "Social 
Phases of Education in the School and the Home," is the 
title of the volume. At one time educational problems 
were not seriously studied, except by teachers; to-day 
there is no subject that excites greater public interest. 
Fathers and mothers are anxious to understand the aims 
and methods of the school, and are interested in knowing 
how "other educational forces in the community may be 
utilized in such a manner as to insure the best growth and 
development of their children." Some of the subjects 
treated are: "The Modern School and What it Owes to. 



Froebel and Herbnrt," "The School and the Child." 
"Phases of the Course oJ Study " "Educational Pro 
"The Relation of Edu 

of the Church to the 6 ation as a Cure for 

Crime," etc., etc. An interesting chapter is that d<- 
to "The Brookline Educational Society and its Work," in 
which its aims and success are set forth. It does not as a 
Society attempt any reforms, but simply seeks to estab- 
lish co-operation in the community, and'to bring all educa- 
tional forces into working relation. "Nothing is more 
sorely needed in our large towns and cities," says Mr. 
Dutton, "than an intelligent and conscientious apprecia- 
tion of what education is and a determination to free the 
schools from the entanglements of politics, and to call to 
their support and direction the best men and women in 
the community." It is fortunate for those interested in 
educational matters— and who should not be — that these 
papers have been put into permanent form, for many of 
the author's suggestions are most valuable. To under- 
stand the subtleties of modern teaching it is essential that 
people who have an interest in the education of their own 
or other people's children should be students of pedagogy, 
thus becoming sympathetic with modern ideas. 

Social Phases of Education : by Samuel T. Dutton. The Maomlllan Co., 
Publishers, New York. For sale by Cunningham, Curtlss & Welch. Price, 
•1.26. 

Club Woman's Club women, whose name to-day is 
Magazine. legion, will hail the coming of a new 
monthly magazine to be devoted to club 
matters. The initial number, which has just appeared, is 
full of interesting data concerning club women, and club 
work. "The Club Woman's Magazine" of which Mrs. Ada 
Brown Talbot is editor, will have for its leading features 
stories, sketches of travel, poetry, the most notable 
papers read before the women's clubs of the country, 
sketches and portraits of prominent club women, viewsof 
club buildings, accounts of important conventions and 
meetings, discussions of questions connected with club 
policy and club work. Separate departments will be de- 
voted to woman in art, literature, professions, etc., to 
health and physical development, to woman in politics, on 
the stage and on the platform, to motherhood and all other 
matters of interest to club women and tending to advance 
the noble purposes for which they are banded together. 
The phenomenal growth of club membership and club in- 
fluence for good throughout the land in recent years, has 
created a great need for such a publication, and it should 
have the liberal support of every progressive woman. 

Club Woman's Magazine: Mrs. Ada Brown Talbot, Editor, 156 Fifth Aye* 
New York. Subscription, 81 per year. 



Sir Roger de Coverley The sixth volume of the new ser- 
and the ies of Cassell's National Library 

Spectator's Club. contains " Sir Roger de Coverley " 
and the "Spectator's Club." 
These little books are printed on good paper, in clear, 
readable type, and are handy in form. They are pub- 
lished weekly, and are for sale at the bookstores. Ten 
cents a volume in paper; 20 cents in neat cloth binding. 

Sir Roger de Coverly and the Spectator's Club : by Richard Steele and 
Joseph Addison. CasselLA Company, Publishers. New York. Sub- 
scription price per year, $5.00. Issued weekly. 

JAMES Lane Allen, of whose last book, "The Choir In- 
visible," nearly 200,000 copies will have been sold be- 
fore his new work leaves the press, has in preparation a 
new novel entitled "The Mettle of the Pasture." It will 
be issued without previous serial publication, and will ap- 
pear in the autumn. It's title is taken from a speech of 
Shakespeare's "warlike Harry" — 

And you, good yeomen, 
Whose limbs were made in England, show us here 
The mettle of your pasture : let us swear 
That you are worth your breeding, which X doubt not; 
For there is none of you so mean and base, 
That hath not that noble lustre in your eyes. 
I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips 
Straining upon the start. The game's afoot : 
Follow your spirit, and upon this charge 
Cry, 'God for Harry, England, and St. George.' " 

M. E. B. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899. 




M R. Long John Wilkins having cast off the Democratic 
J'l party has entered the Republican fold and secured a 
position. He is Messenger for the Quarantine Office. 
What the Messenger has to do no man knoweth, but the 
place carries $50 per month and much dignity. Long John 
having been appointed, and engaging a navy blue suit of 
clothes sallied out one day last week to hunt up his job. 

He went down Market street and strolled into the 
Pacific Mail Offices and inquired for Mr. D. D. Stubbs. 
Mr. Stubbs, who is a bland man and has the manners of a 
gentle missionary, was quite struck with the news that 
Long John was Quarantine Messenger. Mr. Curtis and the 
Spreckels' were also made acquainted with the interesting 
personality of Long John, the people's friend. Long John 
then strolled over to the Merchant's Exchange and Cap- 
tain William Johnson was weighed down with the news. 
Mr. Thomas Binny was glad to learn of the appointment, 
so were the Page boys and then Long John wandered 
down to the front. 

" I am the new messenger," he said to Captain Mile- 
stone. 

"You are, eh?" 

"That's what boss." 

"That's good." 

" What have I to do?'' inquired Long John. 

" Oh you carry messages to the Quarantine Officer." 

" And what am the pay?" 

"Fifty dollars a month and you'll have to ride a bike." 

" A bicycle," and Long John nearly grew white with 
apprehension. 

"That's what you'll have to do." 

" Boss there am something serious wrong. You don't 
'gin to think that I joined the Republican party for $50 a 
month and to ride a bike. No, Boss, there's something 
wrong. I guess I'll go and see Kurnel Burns and straighten 
out this matter right away." 



If, as has been faintly whispered, the Right Reverend 
William Hall Morelahd, Bishop of Sacramento, is a bit of a 
sensationalist, he must be indulging in a solemn chuckle in 
the depths of his ecclesiastical lair over the storm he has 
raised by his sermon on Spiritualism. 

In the course of the study and investigation which pre- 
ceded the delivery of this remarkable discourse, the re- 
cently created prelate visited a rural center of spiritual- 
ism which is irreverently known in the neighborhood as 
Spooktown. While there, he had a discussion with a noted 
spiritualist in reference to the creed of the latter, who 
craftily pressed the Bishop with the familiar argument 
that spiritualism furnishes the best proof possible of Im- 
mortality, with which specious statement he expected to 
"fetch" the Right Reverend Father in God. But the soft 
spoken Bishop is just a trifle smooth himself. 

" Ii Immortality has anything to do with going into a 
dark closet and writing on a filthy slate in bad English 
and worse spelling," he said, soothingly. "I will have 
nothing to say to Immortality. Like the sailor, I 'would 
rather die decent and be done with it foreverl' " 
» * # 

Mr. Leonidas Scoofy, Mr. Clifford Cook, and Messrs. 
Alfred and Eric Rosenstern, formed a partnership of six 
weeks for mutual pleasure and profit, mostly pleasure. 

These four gentlemen, equipped with fishing rods, guns, 
and other destructive weapons, made camp on Eel river 
and prepared to commit slaughter. Mr. Clifford Cook, as 
an old and experienced hunter, ranged the hills for grizzly 
bear; Mr. Eric Rosenstern, who has a prodigious mind and 
a wealth of poetical ease, sat under a willow tree and 
angled for whales. They sprout in Eel river in enormous 
numbers. Mr. Alfred Rosenstern scoured the neighbor- 



hood for wild fruit, bananas, and pineapples, and terrapin 
stew; while Mr. Leonidas Scoofy chased the fallow deer. 
One night the four huntsmen, tired and cross, stumbled 
into camp. 

"What's this? " cried Leonidas, as he saw an upturned 
lard pail, an empty peach crate, and other signs of de- 
struction. 

"My candy 's gone," screamed the whale hunter. 

"Gosh," said the banana seeker, "my cakes that I made 
this morning are eaten." 

Then they heard a snore, a fearful resonant score, and 
the four fell into each others' arms and trembled at the 
fate of the rash intruder. 

There in Eric Rosenstern's bed, peacefully reposing, with 
her head on the pillow and a smile on her face, was a 
well developed matronly pig with a la>-ge and interesting 

family surrounding her. 

* * * 

There is a story back of the row between Louis Du Pont 
Syle, Professor of English in the University of California 
and Professor Charles Mills Gayley, head of the same de- 
partment, which ended in the promotion of the former and 
the humiliation of the latter. Gayley has always been im- 
mensely popular with the girls of his classes and he has 
taken special interest in the progress of his feminine 
pupils when they have been young and pretty. 

Syle, too, has been increasingly popular in the same 
direction, and he has the added advantage 6f being more 
poetical than the matter-of-fact Gayley. But Syle played 
his great trump card when he adapted some Old English 
comedies for the stage and produced them in various halls 
and theatres with his most interesting pupils as actors. 

Nothing could stem the torrent of feminine adoration for 
Syle after that and Gayley was clearly distanced. All the 
girls transferred their allegiance to the professor-play- 
wright-impresario. Thus was born the deadly hatred of 
Mr. Gayley which culminated in his addressing to every 
regent a letter seriously reflecting upon the ability and 
good looks of his poetical colleague. 



Several damsels whose homas are in the neighborhood of 
Alta Plaza pride themselves upon their independence, and 
proudly style themselves "bachelor girls." It has been 
their boast that they can always take care of themselves 
in any emergency, and when they went out bicycling to 
the Cliff one morning, the day being hot, it was without 
any hesitation that they entered the open door of a so- 
called pavilion, which looked cool and airy. 

They begged so nicely for a glass of water all around 
that the attendant waiter obligingly departed to serve 
them. Just as he was returning, bearing his laden tray 
as carefully as if the glasses contained champagne, the 
young women happened to catch sight of a placard on the 
wall. 

"All drinks 10 cents," it read. 

Not one of the bachelor girls had a penny in her pocket, 
and all the amazed waiter had for his trouble was a glimpse 
of flying skirts as the independent maidens beat a pre- 
cipitous and inglorious retreat. 
* * * 

Few men about town can deliver a temperance lecture 
with as good a grace as Horace Piatt, for that smiling 
diner-out is a model of masculine abstemiousness. When 
he was president of the Bohemian Club, it was an inspir- 
ing sight to see Horace, armed with an immense goblet of 
siphon soda, making the circuit of the tables at a formal 
dinner and pretending to drink a glass of "wine" with 
every one. 

But his favorite beverage is the unostentatious tipple 
of his childhood. He is very fond of milk, and drinks it at 
his meals as well as when other men order cocktails and 
punches. So freely does he imbibe this bucolic liqaor that 
his friends are speculating as to its probable effect upon 
him. 

" Poor Horace," said one of the girls, who has tried to 
flirt with him off and on for years. "What a pity it is 
that he hasn't more snap." 

When your stomach feels like an extinct crater, the mornicg after, call 
for Jackson's Napa Soda. 



July 8, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The promotion of Lieut- Colonel Dorst, whose bravery dur- 
ing the Santiago campaign has now passed into hlstor 
calls a good story of the gallant officer when stationed on 
the Pacific Coast, as Captain of Troop K, Fourth 
airy. While his troop was on duty in the interior as guard 
on one of the forest reservations, the slow but steady 
diminishment of a cherished demijohn at headquarters was 
the source of more than ordinary solicitude. Finally, in 
a spirit of desperation, a council of war was called, with 
the result that the advice of Tenison Deane, then Surgeon 
in the United States armv, was adopted, and the residue 
of the Bourbon was well dosed with syrup of ipecacuanha. 
Two days after that the services of the surgeoa were in 
demand. A trooper who considered himself on the verge 
of dissolution was yelling might and main for the doctor. 
This official was soon in his tent, and in course of time the 
man was around again attending to his duties, none the 
worse for his treatment, but subject to some lively chaffing 
from his comrades, the story having soon filtered through 
the camp. As he owned up to the manipulation of *he 
demijohn on sundry occasions, the Captain forgave the 
man with the advice to go and sin no more. Now for the 
joke. Some days later, while encamped in a more south- 
erly portion of the county, some contractors dropped in 
one afternoon to call on the Captain, who was seated in front 
of his tent, surrounded by his junior officers. In due 
time a drink was suggested, and all partook of a nip. 
Half an hour later the entire group was stretched out in 
all directions, captain, subalterns, and guests, surgeon 
Deane himself suffering as much as the others. The 
drugged demijohn had been passed round by mistake. The 
blue-coats had another chance for merriment, in which the 
former victim was able to join. Rira bien qui rira le dernier. 

* * * 

Eear-Admiral Selwyn, on the retired list of the British 
Navy, is the leading spirit of a number of mining enter- 
prises in the northwestern territory, owning, among 
others, the celebrated Red-dog Mine of British Columbia, 
in which a very rich strike was made recently. He had 
for a partner until his death recently a gentleman named 
Jeb, who bad the distinction of immortalization at the 
hands of Rider Haggard as Allan Quartermain, a charac- 
ter well-known to all readers of fiction, the hero of one of 
that author's most interesting stories. Jeb was a won- 
der in real life, as he proved to be under the treatment of 
the novelist, and people who knew him vouch for the 
truthful portraiture of the brave and daring traveler, 
whose experiences were gained in hitherto untraveled 
portions of the Bark Continent. Mr A. J. Donnell, of 
this city, had the pleasure of an association with Allan 
Quartermain, or Jeb, as he was known in real life. He 
traveled with him. and tells some interesting stories of a 
man the like of whom is not born every day. When in 
London Jeb made his headquarters with Rider Haggard, 
the one regarding the other in the light of a brother.. 

* * * 

After Congressmen Hull and Payne returned from the 
dock where they had witnessed the departure of a troop- 
laden transport for the Philippines, the visiting Repre- 
sentatives were taken to the Pacific-Union Club for lunch- 
eon. The discussion was political, without being partisan, 
until one of the party declaimed vehemently against Col- 
onel Bryan as guilty of ceaseless iteration in his addresses 
throughout the country. 

"Think," said he, contemptuously, "of a Presidential 
candidate feeding a great party on such moldy chestnuts." 

Congressman Payne's eyes, it was noted, gave a furtive 
gleam and his portly form shook with something that was 
not wrath, as he overheard the rejoinder of a sturdy 
Democrat : 

" Better feed the party on embalmed speeches than feed 
our soldiers on embalmed beef." 

* * * 

It is one of the mysteries of the University Club how a 
certain young member was able to qualify for admission. 
His brief sojourn at college was curtailed by request of 
the faculty on account of his intellectual deficiencies. 

His friends maintain that he is good hearted, and this 
is his only discovered commendable quality, for his words 

Baldwin s Djspepsla Capsules give qulok relief ana permanent oure. 
Ferry Drug Store, 8 Market street. 



are as few as his ideas. He is engaged to marry a be- 
nighted young woman who, in a moment of aberration. 
accepted him. When Bobby calls ou his fiancft, it is said 
that the young lady is compelled to make the most des- 
perate efforts to keep her eyelids from dropping down like 
trap-doors and fastening with a spring lock. 

The progress of the engagement has been followed with 
passive interest at the University Club, where the latest 
story is to the effect that Bobby's sister-in-law-elect, com- 
ing unexpectedly into the parlor last Monday evening at 
half-past nine o'clock, found the two lovers fast asleep at 
opposite ends of the drawing-room. 

" The apparel oft proclaims the man," declared Polonius in his 
eloquenr sermon to Laertes. .1. M. Litchfield & Co., at 10 Post 
street, make the best-fitting and accurately proper military suits to 
be found in San Francisco. They use nothing but the finest mater- 
ials, employ only the best cutters and tailors, and have the swell 
army trade of the city. They also do fashionable tailoring for gen- 
eral wear. 

The Grand Hotel Cafe fills the want of hundreds of business men 
every day between the hours of U :30 and 2 o'clock, for the cafe is a 
popular well-kept place, and the luncheon is always served in the 
most appetizing manner possible. The best the markets afford is 
always to be had. Foster & Fay are expert caterers. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold bv all druggists. 











A Quick Response to The 
LiqhresTTouch 

__ ° is the way The 

KerpingTon^ 

Standard Typewriter 1m '" 

docs its work - 

Good Work ar thar. ' * 






Wjckoff, Se: 


mans & Benedict, 211 Montgomery St., St 


in Francisco 



P^vX A / C I I I07 Qeary st - s - F - 

Fine Shoes. 



Late with McNULTY. 



Made to Order. 



BGinesda : 



For the Kidneys, Bladder, Indigestion- 

CAHEN & SON, Agents, 

418 Sacramento Street, S. F. 



KODAK AGENCY^ 

T. P ANDREWS, 

109 Montgomery Street - - - San Francisco. 



RE-LOADING, 
DEVELOPING, 
PRINTING. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899. 



ctitTk 




TEKE it not for wed- 
dings, such a thing 
as social life in San Fran- 
cisco might be said to be 
almost extinct, but if 
people elect to be mar- 
ried during the summer months other people must of 
course be in town to see them properly bound and assist 
at the ceremony. Last Saturday's wedding was a home 
one, taking place at the Reed residence on Fillmore street, 
Miss Mabel Reed and Alphonse Duperu being the contract- 
ing parties. The ceremony was performed at noon, in 
the pretty flower-decked parlors, in the presence of rel- 
atives and intimate friends of the bride and groom. The 
bride, who was given away by her father, Captain W. I. 
Reed, U. S. A. (retired), wore a dainty robe of white or- 
gandie trimmed with Valenciennes lace, and was attended 
by her sister, Miss Julia Reed, as maid of honor. Reddick 
Duperu supported his brother as best man. A dejeuner 
followed the ceremony, and then the bride and groom de- 
parted on their honeymoon trip south. 

Society now has the wedding of Miss Alice Ames and 
Thomas H. Robbins to look forward to, which will take 
place at Grace Church at noon on Wednesday, the 19th. 
As the list of bridesmaids include many who are at present 
at the different resorts, it will of course necessitate their 
return to town for the occasion. 

Tuesday next will be the wedding day of Miss Harriet 
Graham and Lieut. Archibald Scales, U. S. N, and the 
marriage will take place at Christ Church, Bay Ridge, 
New York. The bride elect took quite a prominent place 
in our " swim" during the time that her father, General 
Graham, was stationed at the Presidio before the war 
with Spain. 

Among the September weddings will be that of Mrs. J. 
M. Cunningham (one of the pretty Luning girls) and James 
A. Folger, the announcement of their engagement last 
week causing more than a ripple of surprise among their 
friends, who have been profuse in their congratulations to 
both bride and groom in prospective. The Dean-Magee 
engagement is likely to be the next one given to the pub- 
lic. Miss Flora has lately returned from Vassar College. 
Col. Marion P. Maus, whose marriage to Miss Lindsley 
Poor took place at St. James Church, Skaneateles, on 
Wednesday of last week, has arrived with his bride, and 
will make San Francisco his headquarters, as Inspector- 
General of this department. 

The first event of the holiday gathering at Burlingame 
was the golf contest on Monday, in which all the best 
players of the different clubs took part, Miss Alice Moffitt 
winning the prize cup presented to the Burlingame Club 
by Prince Poniatowski. Miss Edith McBean carried off 
the second trophy, a special prize, of a silver cup, pre- 
sented by J. B. Crockett, Miss Rowe becoming the happy 
possessor of a silver bound leather score book. Luncheon 
was served on the balcony of the new clubhouse, with a 
musical accompaniment, as well as at the many villa 
homes in the vicinity, nearly all of which had house parties 
for the holidays. Major Rathbone is entitled to much 
praise for the admirable manner in which all the arrange- 
ments were planned and carried out so successfully. On 
Tuesday, in addition to golf, there was a pigeon shoot and 
pony races in the afternoon. 

To-night the members of the San Mateo Hunt Club will 
dine at the Burlingame club house, when matters of much 
import will be discussed. Tennis and golf have divided in- 
terest in San Rafael. On Tuesday there was a large and 
fashionable attendance of spectators in the tennis court 



when George Whitney won the laurels of the match with 
Sam Hardy. At the golf links there was another crowd 
of fashion to see the contest for the ladies' handicap prize, 
which was won by Miss Eleanor Morrow, the men's handi- 
cap contest taking place on Tuesday, with Harrison Dib- 
blee the victor. 

There was a pretty service last Sunday afternoon in the 
chapel of the Good Samaritan to celebrate the ninth anni- 
versary of the Right Rev. W. F. Nichols as Episcopal 
Bishop of this diocese. At the conclusion of the service 
the Bishop was presented with a golden cross set with 
amethysts, by members of his flock, the presentation 
speech being made by Rev. E. J. Lion, and was happily 
responded to by Bishop Nichols. 

Extra preparations are being made by the members of 
the Bohemian Club for their approaching summer jinks, 
which will be held in their usual resort, Meekers Grove, 
now their very own by purchase. It will be held on Satur- 
day, July 23d, though the camp will be open for two weeks, 
commencing to-day. Captain Robert H. Fletcher will be 
sire of the high jinks, and James Graham will look after 
the low jinks. 

Del Monte was in all its glory on the Fourth; crowds 
from all parts of the State witnessed the different pas- 
times. Fireworks and dancing wound up the pleasures of 
the day. Every one now is looking eagerly forward to 
the gathering in August, which promises to be of unusual 
brilliancy, and will include golf and tennis contests, races 
on sea and land, pigeon shooting, polo, etc. All society 
will be there, and a large number are expected from the 
East who will participate in the festivities. Mrs. Thomas 
Breeze, Mrs. Harry Benson, Miss Breeze, Mrs. L. L. 
Baker and family, Mrs. Fred Zeile and family, Mrs. Jim 
Keeney, and Mrs. William Alvord are among the recent 
acquisitions at Del Monte. 

There were gay doings at Castle Crag ir. honor of the 
national holiday, in all of which Mrs. George Crocker was 
prime mover. Among her own especial guests were Mrs. 
Edgar Carroll, Northrop Cowles, George Hall, Horace 
Piatt; and among others at the Tavern are Mrs. Robert 
Sherwood, Will Sherwood, Miss Holbrook, George David- 
son, Miss Herrick, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Miller, Miss Mil- 
ler, and Paul Miller. 

Miss Mollie Thomas is visiting Miss Daisy Van Ness at 
her home in Napa Valley: George Martin and Horace 
Piatt have also been her guests recently. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lloyd Tevis went over to San Rafael for the festivities of 
the Fourth, as well as Mr. and Mrs. McBean and Miss 
Edith, Mrs. Walter Dean and Miss Helen. Mr. and Mrs. 
W. P. Morgan, the Misses Ella and Theresa, are there now 
for the summer, as well as Ward McAllister. Dr. and 
Mrs. C. F. Bulkely and their daughters are occupying 
the O'Connor house at San Rafael. Mr. and Mrs. Charley 
Bandman, Mrs. Bob Graves, Rabbi Voorsanger and fam- 
ily, have been among the guests at Ben Lomond; Miss 
Jennie Blair will spend July at Bartlett Springs; Mrs. E. 
J. Bowen and Miss Mary Bowen are visiting the big trees 
in Calaveras County; the Misses Celia and Beatrice Tobin, 
Dick Tobin, and Louis Bruguiere have gone to Alaska for 
a month's outing; Mrs. Isaac Hecht aud Miss Elsie will 
be among the August guests at Del Monte. 

W. H. Mills spent last Sunday and the early part of the 
week at Castle Crag, and returned to the city accom- 
panied by his family, who have been passing several weeks 
at the Tavern. 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUDS ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freokles, Motb 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection. It has stood the test of 50 years 
and is so harmless we taste it to be sure 
It is properly made. Aocept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tlent) : "As you ladles wilt use them, I 
recommend ' Gouraud's Cream ' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop'r. 

37 Great Jones St., N. Y. 




July 8. 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR 



«3 




t of Catttle Crag. 



The Tavern of Castle Crag combines in a happy manner 
the delights of the wilderness and the charms of the city. 
A few minutes' walk takes the guest away into the wilds 
of Shasta County, where black bear, deer and trout are 
found. The forests are deep and nature as undisturbed as 
if one were in the midst of the Sierras. One may rough 
it at Castle Crag to the heart's full content, and gain a 
fashionable tan red blood and a delightfully ravenous appe- 
tite. At the Tavern, everything that can be wished to 
minister to comfort and luxurious life are at hand. Man- 
ager Schonewald has made a scientific study of hotel keep- 
ing, to the great advantage of the public. Del Monte and 
Castle Crag fully demonstrate that fact. At Castle Crag 
the things of little as well as those of much consequence 
receive careful attention. The tables are always fresh 
and bright with flowers and ferns, and the abundant menu 
meets the tastes and appetites of every guest. There is 
a homelike quality and an al-fresco flavor to life at the 
Tavern of Castle Crag which makes a summer's sojourn 
particularly beneficial and always a delight. 



Hotel I.vihIoi . ,. s oc. 

mid 1l.1v of .him', but the formal opening took p 

a lurge qui 

Mid other 

:t the bay. I> ibout nine 

■k in the two BpS ... nnd 

ock's hands told the hour of midnight befo 
er left the floor. The h.tel is elegantly equipped for 
the luxurious entertainment of guests, and many visitors 
are now there for the summer. 

Mr. ami Mrs. Thomas Watson, who went abroad some 
weeks ago, are at Marienbad, Germany, where they will 
remain for- a fortnight, after which they will meet a party 
of friends in the south of England, and do the country by 
drag or rail. They are having a line time, enjoyed their 
trip over on the Kaiser Frederick immensely, and have no 
idea when they will return to this city. 

The following are a few of the later arrivals at Hotel 
Belvedere, Belvedere, Cal.: G. Howard Thompson, Miss 
Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. Dimond, Miss Ethel 
Dimond, Mr. Alan Dimond, Miss Clara Morris, W. J. 
Doxey and wife, Mrs. Adelaide Clay, Mrs. F. B. Eaton, 
General W. H. L. Barnes, Mrs. A. M. Scott, Miss E. D. 
Patton, Mr. F. G. Bottom, Samuel Wheeland. Dr. G. C. 
Kenyon and wife, Mr. Cbas. Kenyon, Albert Kenyon, F. 
Kelley. 

The masquerade given at Hotel Belvedere on the even- 
ing of July 3rd proved a great success. Many came from 
San Francisco to participate. There were several hand- 
some prizes given. 

A cheesecloth party was one of tbe entertaining features 
of last Saturday evening at Castle Crag. The idea origin- 
ated with Mrs. W. H. Mills, and was in every way most 
enjoyable. The material was provided by Manager Schone- 
wald. There was a ball and supper at the Tavern on the 
evening of the Fourth, and the hotel was handsomely deco- 
rated with the national colors. 

The arrival of Mr. and Mrs. C. Sloss, nee Hecht, who are 
about due from the East, will be the signal for a round of 
hospitalities among their friends as welcome to the bride 
in her new home. Returns to town include Mrs. Bob 
Woods and Mrs. Charley Peters from their visit to Santa 
Cruz. 

A la carte and table d'hote dinner unsurpassed at 

Roemer's Original Vienna Cafe, 205 Kearny street, near 
Sutter. Moderate prices. 

" Thk Frenchman likes his native wine, 
The German likes his beer, 
The Irishman likes bis whiskey straight 
Beoause it gives goodoheer; 
Tbe Englishman likes his 'alf and 'alf 
Because it mal.es him frisky; 
But they all go back on their favorite drink 
For Jesse Moore •'AA" Whiskey." 



If you want a fine healthy transparent complexion Creme de Lis is a 
necessity. lis action on the skin is wonderful, making it soft and keeping 
it taut and smooth, thus eradicating all wrinkles. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper- plate engraving. Cooper & Co., 746 
Market street, San Francisco. 

A well developed appetite for Napa Soda is a good certificate of oharaoter 



^^*^^*^a»v^*^^^* ^ ^^**^^^*****»vw 



BEAfllSH^^ 



Established 
30 Years 



Has Removed 
to ... . 



-209 



MONTGOMERY ST. 



Directly Opposite Entrance Milts Building. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899. 




Jkktf/cwuREi/mtf 



Some of the principal newspaper 
Wnat Becomes of backers of the emigration to the 
the KlondlkeGold? north, on the report of any fresh 
strikes, are now surprised to hear 
that the Kotzebue rush has developed the fact that the 
discoveries were bogus. It was the same way a short 
time ago down on the Peninsula of Lower California, where 
hundreds of misguided people rushed on the strength of 
exciting reports, only to find that they had been fooled. 
An effort is now being made to throw the blame of the 
northern fiasco on the transportation companies. Any 
disinterested observer, unaffected with the craze for gold 
could have fixed the responsibility long ago, but it pays to 
be blind now and then. Now the proposition is forthcom- 
ing to keep a staff of government mining experts afloat 
aloDg the coast to guard the innocents from slaughter. 
This would be a fine chance for the experts if they are 
built on the same lines as the average politician. The dear 
public would benefit largely after they had managed to ex- 
tract the milk from the cocoanut for themselves and their 
friends. The transportation companies may be bad 
enough, but the Lord preserve us from the official wolf 
employed to protect the sheepfold. Talking about affairs 
up north, it is now pertinent to inquire where all the gold 
goes to when the millions leave the Klondike, which the 
despatches report from time to time . When the 
season draws near for the spring clean-up, the estimates 
run from thirty to fifty millions of dollars. Men who have 
been on the ground and who pose as experts upon the 
proposition, figured up the yield last year at nothing less 
than $10,000,000 and possibly $12,000,000. The Director of 
the Mint estimates the total production of gold in Alaska 
at $2,525 800 for the calendar year 1898. This is a loDg way 
short of the figures based upon estimates of travelers and 
others, although the majority of people will incline to the 
belief that the Mint Director is in a position to know 
whereof he speaks. Where does the balance go if it does 
not pass through the mints of the United States ? Can 
the receipts from Alaska have been mixed up at the sev- 
eral government depositories throughout the country and 
have been wrongfully credited to other localities? If the 
estimates of the outside calculators, some of whom are 
supposed to be beyond suspicion as expert statisticians, are 
correct, then the government official has made a grievous 
error, for which he should be held responsible. The mil- 
lions promised for this year are coming in very slowly, 
and the $30,000,000 mark is still a long way out of range. 
An explanation of this anomalous condition of expert 
calculation would interest a great many people. 

Following the disposal of the copper 
Another Arizona mines of Panuco, in Mexico, to Brit- 
Copper Flotation, ish investors, comes another offering 

—the Ray Copper Mines of Arizona, 
Limited. In the one case the Iron Mountain people them- 
selves are the promoters: in the other, the ex-chief of the 
company at this end of the line is directly interested, hav- 
ing made the report on which the property was sold. 
From this it would seem that the Mountain Mines of Cali- 
fornia proved to be a drawing card. Nothing succeeds 
like success. The Ray Copper Mines, including the Innes 
and Taylor groups, are located on Mineral Creek, near Riv- 
erside, Pinal county, A. T., 45 miles from Pichaco, a sta- 
tion on the Southern Pacific Railroad. Mr. Alexander 
Hill reports 190,000 tons of ore in sight, which he estimates 
to be worth, at 14s. per ton of crude copper, £133,000. 
There is a plant there now capable of treating 75 tons per 
day. In addition to this, he expects to place in sight 
within the next two years at least 2,000,000 tons of ore. 
On the strength of this the directors feel confident that 
with an additional plant, which they propose to put in, 
their profits will be sufficient to pay dividends of not less 
than 25 per cent per annum. The capital is £260,000. Of 
this the vendor gets £210,000, payable, £95.000 in cash 
and £115,000 in paid-up shares, leaving £50,000 for work- 
ing capital. 



The holiday week now closing has not 
A Dull Week in produced much of interest from a finan- 
Stock Circles cial standpoint. An automobile ap- 
peared in the parade on the Fourth, and 
caused cold shivers to affect the spinal column of the nerve- 
less investor in cable roads, who saw ruin following in its 
wake. This shadow cast by coming events does not affect 
the more hardy of the class, who reason very sensibly that 
the one interest cannot possibly interfere with the other, 
while recognizing the fact that in some lines the new ma- 
chines can be utilized to good advantage. Any number of 
shadows can be conjured up by bear operators in the local 
market, and the shares which lack protection suffer 
thereby. It is not a difficult matter to shake holders out 
of any stock in this city which is not well fathered, the 
majority of investors being worse than a lot of old women, 
ready to bolt and run at a moment's notice on any kind of 
bluff. Sugar speculators welcome the end of the holidays, 
hoping that the long foretold boom will now materialize. 
They, are ready when the manipulators start the ball roll- 
ing. If the boom succeeds in pulling out some of the money 
now locked up in the vaults of savings banks it will be 
bailed as a blessing in disguise. 

The atest venture in copper re- 

Another Copper Deal ported is what is known as the 

in London. Buena Vista Copper Mines, in 

Lower California, which seem to 
have its chief merit based upon the fact that it is close to 
the Boleo Mines. Many people will doubtless take another 
view of the matter, and conclude that the property would 
not go a-begging had it any great value, lying as it does 
within easy reach of the great French company, which is 
always ready to pick up anything good in its line of busi- 
ness. The ores of the Buena Vista are said to run about 
15 per cent, a high enough grade, provided there is plenty 
of it. The capital asked is £50,000, of which, £3,000 in 
cash and £32,000 in shares is the purchase price, the bal- 
ance, £15,000, being set aside for working capital. The 
proper purchasers for this property should be the Boleo 
Company, if it is what it is cracked up to be. 

The relative positions of the heavy 

How States Stand gold producing American States is 

as Gold Producers, as follows: Colorado first, California 

second, South Dakota third, Mon- 
tana fourth, Nevada fifth, Alaska, (Klondike and all) sixth, 
with Arizona running it a close tie, coming in seventh. 
Utah ranks eighth, all the other States running below 
$2,000,000, Iowa, Michigan and Minnesota coming in at the 
heels of the hunt, with $100 each to their credit. Nevada, 
the so-called silver State, with a credit of $2,994,500 in 
gold, only produced 805,000 ounces of the white metal, 
showing which foot the boot was on during the past year 
of grace. 

The Bullionist says: "Once again the 

The Rand Gold Transvaal gold output outstrips all pre- 

Yield. vious records. The total production for 

the month of May is returned at 466,452 
ounces, as against 460,349 ounces for April, and 464,036 
ounces in March, the best previous record. Of last 
month's total the Rand is responsible for 444.938 ounces, 
as against 439,111 ounces for April, and 441,578 ounces in 
March. The output of the outside district, on the other 
hand, shows an improvement on April, and a decrease as 
compared with March. Compared with the correspond- 
ing returns a year ago, the respective productions of the 
Rand and the outside districts present, as usual, a strik- 
ing contrast. Thus the Rand has increased its output 
over 100,000 ounces, the respective totals being 444,938 
ounces in 1899 and 344,160 ounces in 1898, while the out- 
put of the outside districts has increased but slightly, ris : 
ing only from 20,856 ounces to 21,519 ounces." 



The London and 
San Francisco Bank. 



From news received here it is just 
possible that the scheme of London 
shareholders to reconstruct the 
London & San Francisco Bank will 
fall through. The opposition clique does not seem to pos- 
sess the confidence of the rest of the shareholders, who be- 
lieve in leaving well enough alone. 



July 8, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«5 




"Hear the Crier?" "Wbil the devil art thou!" 
"One that will play the devil, sir. with you." 

WELBURN cannot be convicted of the crimes for 
which he fled the State. That is clear. With eight 
enlightened jurors voting for his acquittal on his first 
trial, with evidence a great deal stronger than proofs of 
Holy Writ, with bis flight, the facts, and the testimony of 
forgeries and embezzlement before them, these eight jurors 
say that he is innocent. It is an insult to intelligence to 
say that these men thought Welburn not guilty. The en- 
tire atmosphere of the case, the testimony — everything 
shout "guilty " in all the languages known to civilization. 
Conscience drowses and judgment and integrity take a 
day off when the average juror holds up his hand and 
swears to judge the case by the evidence. The good title 
of the city is again ravished, and the very name of justice 
made to smell like a soap factory. A jury last Saturday 
found a woman, whose husband was charged with having 
broken the Seventh Commandment and whom she had shot 
to death, guilty of no crime at all! What a filling of 
cemeteries would follow the avenger if this rule were gen- 
erally applied. The jury justified this verdict on the 
ground that the woman who did the killing was a con- 
sumptive and would not live a fortnight. 

INDEPENDENCE Day is gone, and there can be few 
things that may be. more delightfully spoken of in the 
past tense. The Crier is a patriot, willing and even anx- 
ious to see other fellows die for the flag. He believes in 
and reveres the Stars and Stripes, but noise delights him 
not. The occupation of the idiot with the bomb, who joys 
in exploding fireworks beneath the feet of ladies and aim- 
ing firecrackers at the eyes of gentlemen, is gone for an- 
other twelve months. The high-cavorting steeds and the 
swell-chested heroes of a day have been returned to their 
respective private duties. The Declaration of Independ- 
ence, which has been shot as full of holes as Montejo's 
fleet, will not make a mockery of its own lofty sentiments 
for another year. Let us thank God that the Fourth of 
July cannot come more than once a year, and that this 
year General Dickenson came not at all. 

WHEELER, the new-elected president of the University 
of California is so foolish as to hold that the man who 
is responsible for the success or failure of an institution 
should not be tied to the apron strings of a convocation of 
politicians. Some of the regents are opposed to the new 
president because he bluffly tells them he must boss the 
roost if he comes to Berkeley. They have been bilking 
and bullying so long that surrender of their power to do 
mischief and the fathering of their own petty likes and 
dislikes falls as a bitter cathartic. President Wheeler is 
wise. The University of California has been suffering for 
a long time from too little president and too much regent. 

S GENTLEMAN has arrived in San Francisco to or- 
ganize and set in operation an autotruck company. 
May he be immediately successful, and may the noble 
equine soon disappear from the city's principal streets. 
The autotruck and the automobile leave no trace behind 
them to dry up, desiccate, and fill the eyes, mouths, hair, 
and ears of a long patient public. When the automobile 
and autotruck arrive, and the streets are sprinkled with 
salt water, the summer breezes, which now are a plague, 
will be an invigorating delight. The horseless carriage 
cannot drive the equine into the ocean or the interior one 
moment too soon. 

IF the Supervisors are able to stand up and be counted 
when they sit as a Board of Equalization, the poor tax- 
payer will be thankful, and have a dollar left in his pocket. 
Assessor Dodge has clearly shown that there's really 
nothing in a name. Apparently no man has been able to 
Dodge bis tax levy. 



TBE ofaeerfa] dictum of the ministers, who claim that 
in the Bene flames of devastation and the fire and 
sword now scourging the Philippine blander 

the hand of (iod. is going the Mosaic doctrine of an eye for 
an eye and a tooth for a tooth one bettor. In other words, 
if a barbarian does nut yearn for the tranquil assurances 
of Christian salvation, run a Bible into his stomach on the 
point of a bayonet. Itinerant Jeffries, father of Bruiser 
Jeff, declares with much unction that God was in the Init- 
tle when his son punched himself into fame and fortune. 
This delicate compliment to the Almighty pales in the 
bright evangelical glow that wreathes the benevolent pul- 
piteers who see the band of God in the tragedy now going 
on in the Philippines. 

HOWLINGS of torment are heard from the clerks 
about the City Hall. Fear sits upon their faces; they 
are up against a day's hard work for a good day's pay. 
When the cut in the forces takes place, the gentlemen 
who spend their time in swopping lies, chewing toothpicks, 
absorbing beer and keeping the public in obsequious and 
patient waiting, will have to earn the money that is paid 
them. This is, of itself, revolutionary. We shall not, 
however, hear of any vacancies by resignation in any of 
the " crippled" departments. If the Supervisors will re- 
tain a grip on their nerves, the bluff that is now being put 
up will fail, and for the first time on record there will be 
observed in the hall a practical application of the dignity 
of labor. 

A PHYSICIAN who has not sufficient sense, either na- 
tive or accumulated, to diagnose a case of small-pox, 
and wanders all the way from pneumonia and alcoholism 
to scarlet fever, should be promptly and properly 
squelched. Dr. McLay's stupidity very probably sent two 
people to their graves — one from the Pest-house and an- 
other from a private residence. It took a consultation 
and the opinion of two physicians to knock the scales off 
the Doctor's eyes, and distribute them about the person of 
the now unfortunately departed citizen. There appears 
to be no adequate punishment for this sort of crime. If 
there were, the doctor who didn't know alcoholism and 
pneumonia from smallpox would be relieved of his keep 
for a prolonged period. 

ZOLA, the great Frenchman, has returned thanks to 
the English for their respectful inattention during his 
banishment in London. They neither bored him by offen- 
sive notice nor smothered him with prayer for interview 
or autograph. Had Zola been in San Francisco, a hun- 
dred reporters would have clamored for admission to his 
most private apartment. He would have been aroused 
from slumber, ardently waylaid whenever he dared appear 
abroad, and we would have known the weights of his un- 
derwear, the check of his hose, the food he preferred, and 
when his wash went out. Zola should have come to Amer- 
ica to learn what the freedom of yellow journalism really is. 

HOTEL Nymphia has been inspected by the Police Com- 
missioners because of. a desire to know whether a 
license to sell liquor should issue to that place. The prem- 
ises were not disinfected before their arrival. The gentle- 
men should have no great difficulty in reaching a strong 
and persistent negative. The Nymphia has nothing to 
recommend it beyond a superlative degree of concentrated 
badness and a hyphenated political parentage. Such a 
place as the Hotel Nymphia should find no habitation in 
San Francisco. Smallpox aad leprosy are quarantined; 
the moral contagion of the Hotel Nymphia justifies the 
painting of its doors crimson and the placing of a yellow 
flag above its roof. 

THERE was one omission in the otherwise fine parade 
of July Fourth that was noticeable and caused serious 
and surprised comment. It was the absence of P. T. Rob- 
inson, Fred Raabe and especially J. M. Chretien. Tempora- 
rily eclipsed, the Chretien person will no doubt be promptly 
on hand at the next collection of funds for public celebra- 
tion. Great patriot, Chretien. 

GENTLEMEN of the Health Department who imagined 
that the bubonic plague was knocking at the gates 
of the city in the form of two dead Japanese, are resting 
on their laurels pending the termination of the question of 
salaries for present forces and future additions to their 
over-worked ranks. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899. 



OBITUARY. 

FEW deaths, indeed, have occurred in San Francisco 
within recent years that have caused the very general 
regret which followed the announcement of the demise of 
Mrs. Henry Gibbons, wife of Dr. Henry Gibbons, on last 
Monday at the family residence, corner of Polk and Geary 
streets. Mrs. Gibbons was a woman of wide acquain- 
tance and numerous friendships. Hers was a character 
sunny, bright and warm, and her many mental graces were 
accented and set off by a charming personality. In her 
home Mrs. Gibbons made up the full measure of mother 
and wife, and in social circles and in works of charity she 
was a useful member and an active participant. A prom- 
inent member of the First Unitarian Church, of the Colo- 
nial Dames, of the Daughters of the American Revolution, 
and Past President of the Century Club, her strong and 
gracious individuality was felt and recognized a blessing. 
Her father, Samuel Raymond, was a well-known mining 
man; and the husband thus deeply bereaved is a promi- 
nent physician, Dean of the Cooper Medical Institute, and 
stands at the head of the profession of medicine in this 
State. There are six children in the Gibbons family, four 
daughters and two sons, whose loss by this good woman's 
death is inexpressibly great. To them all and to their father 
the sympathy of many friends is extended. The funeral 
services were conducted on last Wednesday from the 
church of which she was a member, and were conducted 
by Rev. Horatio Stebbins and Dr. Wells. The church was 
bright with flowers, and was filled with those who, know- 
ing Mrs. Gibbons in life, loved her in death. The 
pall-bearers were W. H. Mills, C. A. Murdock, T. E. 
Jewell, W. G. Harrison, F. P. Deering, Frederick Hobbs, 
Sheldon Kellogg and C. P. Osgood. The remains sleep in 
Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland. 



According to Giovanni P. Morosini, who knew him 

well, Garibaldi was " one of the greatest of modern 
statesmen." Says Mr. Morosini in the New Voice: " He 
seemed to have an intuitive rather than an acquired 
knowledge of the relationship of nations to one another. 
His knowledge of the principles of international law was 
broad and comprehensive, and his appetite for learning 
all about the military affairs of the different countries of 
Europe was insatiable." 



Emile Loubet, President of the French Republic, has 

again been proving that "one touch of nature makes the 
whole world kin." He stopped his carriage in a state 
procession through the streets of Mont^limar, rushed up 
to a balcony where his aged mother was and bugged and 
kissed her before the whole crowd. Now Fiance is chant- 
ing his praises as though he had slain a hundred thousand 
of her foes. 

The latest gossip from royal circles on the Riviera 

is that Princess Beatrice is writing a book about the 
court and its visits to France. It will be sure to have a 
great sale, for apart from the Princess' own popularity 
and the widespread interest in her theme, it will be the 
first book written by one of her majesty's children. 

In times 01 peace; In times of war, 
The favorite drink Is Jesse Moore. 



Fob biliousness, constipation, torpid liver, sallow skin, use Baldwin's 
Health Tablets. Ferry Diug store, 8 Market street. 

There are lots of "AA" brands of whisky, but onlr one Jesse Moore "AA ' 

In looking over the oard of liquid refreshments do not forget Napa Soda 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Ophlr Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 75 

Amount per Share 15 oents 

Levied July6,18M 

Delinquent In Office August 8 1899 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 28, 1899 

B. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Room 50, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street. San Franclsoo, 
California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Paauhau Sugar Plantation Company. 

Dividend No. 5 (30 cents per share) of the Paauhau Suerar Planta* Ion 

Company, will be payable at tbe office of the company 327 Market street, 

on and after Monday, July 10, 1899. Transfer books will cloBe on Monday, 

July 3, 1899, at 3 o'olook p.m. EH. SHELDON, Secretary. 



To stiff-necked, 

stubborn women: — "Only two 
kinds of people never change 
their minds— fools anddeadmen." 
And you can't be either one. 
Change your mind, then, about 
the best way of washing ; look 
into the matter carefully ; lay 
aside prejudice ; hold yourself 
open to convincement. The best 
way of washing is with Pearl- 
ine. Ease, economy, safety, health, quickness — 
these are the arguments for Pearline washing. 
Every woman who wants these things can 
satisfy herself that this is so. 556 

WORTHINGTON AMES, 

riember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker in Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities. 

138 Montgomery St., S. F. Tel. Blaok 0O\ 




Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, 



THE AWARD AT 
CHICAGO 1893. 



Gold Medals, Paris, 1878-1889. These pens are ' the 
best in the world. " Sole aeent for the United Stale* 
ME Henky Hob, 91 John street. NewYork. 
Sold by all Stationers. 



Facitic Towel Company 



No. 9 



Lick Place 



Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels, $1 per month. 
13 hand or roller towels, $1.50 per month. 
Tel. No. Main 1780. 



W63k MCll 3(10 WOlllCn TERS.thegreatMexlcanrem 
edy ; It gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 823 Mar 
street. San Francisco. Send for circular. 



f. c. 




Both Stylish and 
Elegant. : : : 



F. C. corsets y I 

I 

I 

Made of fine materials. Sold by leading stoies *: 



^♦^•^•^•^•^•^•^•^•^•^•^ 



G. A. MURDOCK & GO., Printers, 

No- 532 CLAY STREET, S F- 

THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL. Dinner.— Sunday, July 9, 1899. 

California Oyster Cocktail. 
Soup— Scotcn Hodgepodge; Chicken Consomme aux Noullles. 
HorsD'Oeuvres— Celery enBranche; California Olives ; Salted Almonds ; 

Uh'w Chow. 
Fish.— Boiled Columbia River Salmon, Sauce Venitienne; PaupietteB of 

Filet of Sole a la Nantua; Sliced Cucumbers ; Pommes Holland also. 
Boiled-— smoked Beef Tongue, Sauce Cumberland. 
Entrees.— Timbales of Diamond Back Terrapin a la Baltimore; Scalops of 

Sweetbreads a la Chicoree; Filet Mignon of Beef a la Richelieu; 

Rissoles of Apricots au Noyeau. 
Roast -Prime Ribs of Beef au Jus; Saddle of Spring Lamb, Mint Sauce; 

S'uffed Young Duck, Apple Sauce Punch.— Cbar:reuse. 
Vegetables.— Boiled. Baked, and Masbed Potatoes; Asparagus Beurre 

Foadu; Corn Saute aux Piments; Boiled Rtoe;. Green Peas a l'An- 

glalse 
Cold Meats.— Ham Glace; Roast Beef; Chicken Chau Froid a P Aspic; 

Pate of Squab aux Truffes. 
Salads— Waldorf; Lettuce: Dent de Lion; Pomaine. 
Dessert— Lemon Cust»rd Pudding, Maraschino sauce; Strawberry Pie: 

Vanlla Cream Pie; Port Wine Jelly; Pineapple Ice Cream; Assorted 

Nuts. Cluster Raisins, Assorted Cakes; American Cream. Edam and 

Roquefort Cheese; Fruit in Season, Smyrna Flga, Tea and Coffee. 
Dishes not on this menu oan be ordered at restaurant prices 
Dinner, 6 to 8 p. h. R. H. WARFIELD & CO., Proprietors. 



July 8, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«7 




Palm at Mission San Jose, Cal. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899. 



THE MAN WITH THE AXE. 



IF I were the man with the axe, 
At the roots of the forest of woe, 
I'd lay till my merciless whacks 

Spoiled the job of the man with the hoe. 
The scourge, knout, and thumbscrew have failed, 

The pillories, too, and the racks, 
But I'd settle full grand all the matter in hand, 
If I were the man with the axe. 

If I were the man with the axe, ..._..., 

The fakers I'd part at the neck; 
The patience of Job they would tax, 

Let alone the best fighter on deck. 
Their dime-begging schemes should be sunk 

As Dewey sank Spain with his Jacks; 
The hero could smile and think living worth while 

If I were the man with the axe. 

If I were the man with the axe, 

I'd slaughter the ferry-boat hog 
Whose bench-load of bundles and packs 

Makes human-kind stand in the fog. 
The fiend with the garlicky breath 

In the street car would draw my attacks, 
While the hat "la Roxane" at the play I would ban, 

If I were the man with the axe. 

If I were the man with the axe, 

Each kicker who holdeth the world 
To blame for whatever he lacks 

Would be stilled when my weapon had whirled. 
The man with the kicking disease 

Beheaded would be in his tracks, 
And times be improved with the kicker removed, 

If 1 were the man with the axe. 

If I were the man with the axe, 

I'd revel in maniac glee 
O'er croakers and grumblers in stacks 

Piled up and as still as could be. 
Then labor and brains could combine: 

Where crouched deceased poverty's shacks 
Bright homes would arise 'neath prosperity's skies, 

If I were the man with the axe. 
San Francisco, July 8, 1899. 



Colonel Theodore Roosevelt and General Leonard 

Wood, now Governor of Santiago, have been friends ever 
since the Governor of New York entered the Naval De- 
partment. In Scribner's the latter thus characterizes 
General Wood: "Like so many of the gallant fighters with 
whom it was later my good fortune to serve, he combined 
in a very high degree the qualities of entire manliness with 
entire uprightness and cleanliness of character. It was a 
pleasure to deal with a man of high ideals, who scorned 
everything base, and who also possessed those robust and 
hardy qualities of a body and mind for the lack of which no 
merely negative virtue can ever atone. He was by nature 
a soldier of the highest type, and like most natural sol- 
diers, he was, of course, born with a keen longing for ad- 
venture, and, though an excellent doctor, what he really 
desired was the chance to lead men in some kind of hazard. 
To every possibility of such adventure he paid quick at- 
tention." 

Insist Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 
Other Eastern Cities read over the Nickel Plate (N. Y, C. & St. 
L. K. R.), the popular low-rate short line. Quick time, unexcelled 
accommodations, and no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adams, 
Pacific Ooast Passenger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A Sovereign Keniedy. One dose will stop a cough. It never fails. 
Try it. Price, 25 cents. George DahlbeiIdeb & Co., 214 Kearny 
street. For sale by all druggists. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F., deals 
In all kinds of newspaper information, business, personal, political, from 
pressor State, Oo&flt. and Country. Tel. Main 1048. 



Jaokson's Napa Soda water cures dyspepsia 



Mining Machinery «»«« supplies 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 
Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill 
Bartlett Concentrating Table 
James Ore Feeder 
Roger Improved Crushing Rolls 
Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers 
Two and Three Stamp Mills 
Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps 
Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery 

PARKE & LACY CO., 21 and 23 Fremont Street. 8. r" 

JOSEPH FIGEL, MERCHANT TAILOR 

2d Floor Flood Building. Entrance Room 5. 



FIRST- 
CLASS 
CUSTOM 
TAILORING 
AT 

MODERATE 
COST. 



This is an invitation to accurate dressers— men 
who have been paying $50 to $<i5 for business suits 
—to look over our assortment of fancy cheviots and 
worsteds that we're making up from $30 to $50' 
It's quite an item, isn't it, to save $15 on a suit? 
Depend on being properly fitted, on correot styles 
and on excellent workmanship. 



There's a splendid assortment of trouserings, too. 



Hugh a, boyle 



(O. A. Helmquisx, Cutter). 



FINE 



TAILORING 



Room 9 Flood Building 
San Franolsoo. 



Bon Marcne 
Glottilna Renovatoru 

40 Ellis Street, room 1-2. 



SUITS CLEANED 
AND PRESSED 



$1.00 



L. B. NORDLUND 



BROUGHAMS AND 60UPES (Rubber Tires.) 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE 

Nos. 57-B9-61 Minna Street, Between First 
and Seoond. One block from Palace Hotel. 
Carriages and coupes at Paolflo Union Club, 
Corner Post and Stookton. Tel. Main 153. 
Every vehicle requisite for weddings. Par- 
ties, calling, shopping, business, or Pleas- 
ure. Special orders for four-in-hands. 
Tel. Main 163. 
J. Tomkinson, Prop'r. Established 1888. 




DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



813 Sutter Street, 
Tel. East 629. 



Dentist 



H. ISAAC cJONES, M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Offloo, 33-1 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stookton Sts., S. F. 

Hours, 10 a. h. to 4 p. H. Sunday by appointment. 

Tel. Grant 101. 

I"IR r» F nilNNF Of Olympio Club, Chiropodist, at Lucke's 
L»[\. U. L,. L/unnt, Snoo stor6 , 8 32 Market Street, S. F. 
Hours from 9 a. M. to IS m.; 1 P. M. to 8 p. M. Ingrowing toe nails a 
speolalty. _ 

Johanni& 

As a table water is unsurpassed. 

—London Hospital Gazetlt. 



July 8, 1899. 

A HILL TOP NOVEL. 
Chapter I. 



Mid the green forest they roamed, those 
two, hand in hand, the cool undergrowth 
spreading inviting couches lor the weary. 

" What if it was so," he said after 
a long delicious pause. "Can that 
make us other than what we are?" 

" No, my love; it never can. As 
well may a wall stay the flight of the 
west wind, as that mad vow to check 
my love for you, my prince." 

" It were wrong to be other than 
what we are," the man said gravely. 
"You and I must be together bound 
by love alone." 

"' Until death do us part," said the 
woman solemnly. 

"Or other natural causes. It is 
useless to make promises which 
Nature will never ratify," he said. 

"That is true," she said. 

A cock crowed on the distant hills 
that were dimly purple between the 
veil of trees. 

"He is happy," said the man. "No 
scolding vows tie him to injustice. He 
is free. Happy, thrice happy birdl" 

Another cock answered the first — 
a strong, hoarse challenge. 

"And he is not the only lover in the 
world," she said. "See how chantic- 
leer answers chanticleer. The brav- 
est, the most beautiful, shall win the 
love of the fair, and only he." 

He turned to her a grey face, lined 
and marked — a fierce face that was 
seared with passion. 

"Am I the bravest and most beauti- 
ful in your eyes?" he asked. 

" At present,'' she an wered care- 
lessly. 

Chaptbe XLVII. 

Two couples, each a man and a wo- 
man, strolled through the forest now 
painted with autumn's colors. Great 
couches of leaves were strewn among 
the bent bracken and trailing bushes, 
but neither couple rested. One 
couple was walking westward, the 



p »<; 

eoups 

OFTEN LACK RICHNESS 
AND A DELICACY OF FLAVOR. 
A FAULT EASILY REMEDIED BY USING 

i* LEA 4 

PERRINS 
SAUCE 

r * e OR, GINA1 _ ANO G£NU»* 

Worcestershire- 

It has more Imitations 

than any other brand 

ever produced. 

■ John Duncan's 5ons.Ag'ts.,rlevwYork. 1 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



other eastward, and rapidly ap 
preaching each the other. 

A cock crowed on the bare hills be- 
yond, and the man of the one couple 
remarked to the fair young girl be- 
side him: 

"Thrice happy is he in his freedom. 
He loves, and is not ashamed to tell 
it to the world." 

"Hadn't we better be going back?" 
murmured the girl. 

"Why should we? We love each 
other, do we not?" 

" Yes, yes, I love you, yes " 

" Have no compunction. I tell you 
that I know what is right, and it is 
right to love." 

"Yes, only " 

" I tell you that you belong to the 
moment. The present is ours— the 
past 1 had no share in, so that you 
must put it aside. It is dead, but the 
hour throbs with love, my own, my 
love." 

And, coming nearer to them, the 
woman of the other couple heard the 
cock's crow, and said: 

"Brave bird, ohl how we love 
courage, we women! I love you be- 
cause you are not afraid to face the 
world at my side." 

"But don't you think " began 

the man with her, and she inter- 
rupted him : 

"Why should we think — why take 
heed for the morrow? Kiss me, my 
hero, my knight," and she held up her 
red, full lips to bis white face. 

Then there came close to them the 
first couple ; and the man of the first 
and the woman of the second couple 
looked steadily at each other, bowed, 
and then passed on, and thought of 
the day they had strolled together in 
this place when the leaves were green. 

" Do you know her 1" whispered the 
young girl to the first man ; "she is 
dreadfully fast they say." 

"I have met her," answered the 
man. "She is as you say, fast. Wo- 
men of that description find their own 
punishment. No lady in my circle of 
acquaintance will receive her ; my 
family would not recognize her. I 
should not like you to do so." 

"Why do you know her then?" 
asked the maid. 

"Oh, a man my do much without 
smirching his name," he replied. 
"She cannot harm me." 

And then a long kiss drowsed in the 
stillness of the woods. — Pick-me-up. 






The growth of population in 

American States between 1890 and 
1900 will be in accordance with the 
increase of the urban population in 
each rather than with the gain in 
agricultural districts. As a majority 
of the cities are in the North, it ap- 
pears likely that the "center of popu- 
lation" in 1900 will be on or near the 
banks of the Wabash in the State of 
Indiana, at some point northwesterly 
from the present center and nearer 
the Illinois than the Ohio state line. 



" Henry, why do you smoke contin- 
ually from morning until night ? " 
"It's the only time I get. I sleep 
from night until morning." 



! 

i 



IS THE BEST 



BECAUSE ITS PURITY 
IS ABSOLUTE. ITS FLAVOR 
UNIQUE . HADE IN 

NICE. FRANCE 





TRY IT WITH YOUR ■ 

L -~-J SALADS l 



^W>^A^rV^*^V^w^w^w^wV»^r^* 



Reduced Uono 
Distance Tariff 




minute minute for each 



I 



8 .50 15 sec'ds 



.60 $.75 10 sec'ds 



.50 (1.00 10 sec'ds 



U.E' 

}■( .5 

J ( ,75 $1.25 5 sec'ds 

$1.00 11.50 3 sec'ds 



Tariff bet. San 
Francisco and any 
oft ice in 
Colusa County 
Sutter County 
Yuba County 
Plaoer County 
Butte County 
Glenn County 
Nevada County 
Fresno County 
Tulare County 
Kings County 
Ventura County 
Santa Barbara Co. 
Los Angeles Co. 
Orange County 
Riverside County 
San Bernardino Co. 

VAAAAAAAAAAAVANAAAAAAAVVV 



J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Co. 

Shipping and Commission Mer- 
chants. General agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

Gllllngham Cement. 

327 Market St.. cor. Fremont, S. F. 
Gitu Index and Purchaser's Guide 

RESTAURANTS 
POODLE DOG Restaurant, N.E. cor. Eddy 
and Mason streets. Private dining and 
banquet rooms. Telephone 429. 

A. B. Blahco & B. Betjb 
BAY STATE Oyster House & Grill room, 
15 Stockton street and 109 O'Farrell St. 
N. M. Adlke, proprietor. Tel. Main 5057 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS 
W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan St. Select- 
ions on approval ; any place in the world. 

BOILER-MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron 
Works— 314-316-318 Main St; Iron work of 
every description designed and constrncted 

CASOA EERRINE BITTERS 
The world's greatest tonic, stomachic, laxa- 
tive; cares positively constipation and 
piles. Siehra Pharmaceutical Co., 1109 
Howard street, San Francisco. 

DENTISTS. 

DR. G. A. DANZIGER. Dentist, 22 Geary 
Street, San Francisco. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899-. 




The News Letter has es- 
tablished at its office, No.5H 
Kearny street, a reliable Bu- 
reau of Inrormation, where any- 
one seeking information, routes 
of travel, attractions, prices of 
entertainment, and all other 
facts that are necessary to a 
choice of a Summer Resort may 
be obtained FREE. 



HIGHLAND SPRINGS ^ wmy 

"The great sanitarium of the west; open every day in the year; new hotel 
elegantly furnished; table unsurpassed; lighted by electricity; thousands 
cured by its waters. Finest swimming tank, bowling alley and dancing 
hall in Lake county, together with complete livery stable, gentle saddle 
horses and ponies. .... . „ , 

Over 30 Kinds of Mineral Springs 

Physician in attendance: superb climate; beautiful mountain scenery ; 
trout, deer, and small game plentiful: magnificent drives; baths in variety; 
lawn tennis and oroquet: reached by the shortest stage route into Lake 
county; round-trip fare from San Francisco, via Hopland, $8; via Calis- 
toga, $9. - 

Hote and Cottage Rates. $10 to $14 per week 

Take S. F, & N. P. Railway to Hupland, or S. P. R. R. to Calistoga. 

For illustrated pamphlet or further information address J. CRAIG, 
Highland Springs, Lake county, Cal. ; or see L. D. CRAIG. 316 Montgomery 
street. Highland Springs mineral waters on sale at Oakland Pioneer 
Soda Water Co., Thirteenth and Webster streets, Oakland; Ahrens, Pein 
& Bullwlnkel. 630 Post street. S. F. 



HOWARD SPRINGS 




picturesquely situated 
amidst the pine forests 
of Lake Co.— the Switzerland of America. 
Elevation 2300 feet; no fog; climate per- 
fect. Natural hot mineral plunge and tub 
baths, fine medicinal drinking water. Ex- 
cellent fishing and hunting. Postofflce and 
telephone on premises. Rates 88. 110 and 
$12 with special terms for families. Ac- 
commodations, table and service first olass. 
Round tilp from San Francisco via Napa, 
Calistoga, $10, including fine stage drive. 

For accommodations and further par- 
ticulars address 

MRS. R. J. BEEBY, proprietor, Putah P.O. 



HOTEL BE^VENUE AND COTTAGES 



LAKEPu,. CAL 
Lakeport's Leading Sunni^- Resort. 
Situated overlooking the shore on Clear Lake. 
Elegant new pavilion. Boat house and Bowl 
log Alley. Special faclli ties for accommo- 
dating families with children; home cooking; 
boating, bathing, hunting, and superior fish- 
ing; no Chinese employed. 

Open all the year 
FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors 



^ 




BLUE LAKES HOTEL 

Will be conducted in a quiet, home-like 
manner, with one of the best tables in the 
county; Rates $10 to $12. Round trip $9.50. 
S. F. & N. P. to Ukiah; thence by stage from 
Palace Hotel. Address 



JOHN WILSON, 



Bertha, Lake county, Cal. 



THE GEYSER 



SPRINGS 

SONOMA COUNTY CAL. 



Ninety-six mileB from San Francisco: new management; important 
improvements; table unsurpassed; rates $10 to $14 per week— $2.50 per day. 
For information apply, G. GALE, Geysers, Cal. 



CARLSBAD ■ Tne most beautiful spot in Lake County 

The mineral springs are well known for marvelous cures when every- 
thing else falls, especially In cases of stomach, liver, kidney and bladder 
affections. Good bathing; superior accommodations $10 per week; hotel 
lighted with gas ; good trout fishing and deer hunting on property. 

For particulars write W. R. McGOVERN, Carlsbad, Lake County 



SEIGLER SPRINGS LAKE county, cal. 




This delightful watering place is located 
in the midst of the Coast Range. 

Abundance of Mineral Springs 
Hot and cold plunge baths, large swim- 
ming tank of mineral water, fine stone 
dining room ; telephone connections ; 
electric lights, livery accommodation; 
good trout fishing and hunting. Round 
trip tickets at Southern Pacific offices, 
$10. 

JOHN SPAULDING, Proprietor. 



BONANZA SPRINGS 



LAKE COUNTY. CAL. A 

natural camping ground; five 
different mineral and two pure 
wate .prlngs. We cater to campers only. Fishing and hunting; cottages 
to re ;. $1.50 up per week ; pure water piped to each cottage. Hot and cold 
mineral baths; all necessaries can be purchased on the grounds; ham- 
mocks, swings, andcroquet; summer houses in shady groves. One mile 
north of Howard Sprli gs Post and Money Order Office— daily mail- Ad- 
dress, R. F. DOCKERY, Prop.. Putah P. 0-, Lake County, Cal., or S. F. 
News Letter Bureau, 5>4 Kearny St. 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Only natural mineral steam baths in Lake Co. 

Hot sulphur and Iron Baths. Board $8 to $14 
per week; baths free. Address 

J, ANDERSON, 
Anderson Springs Middle town, Lake county. 
Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return, $8. 
Send for circular. 

<g"Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 54 Kearny street, S. F. 




GLEN BROOK Lake county 

Remember— It you want to hunt; if you want to 
fish; If you want to recuperate; if you want the 
best of recreation; if you want pure air and sun- 
shine; if you want to enjoy an exhilarating climate 

Come to Glenbrook 
0. W. R. TREDWAY, proprietor Glenbrook Hotel 




Take Tiburon Ferry at 7 
a week. 



SKAGGS HOT SPRINGS Sonoma county 

Only 44 hours from San Francisco and but 9 miles staging. Waters 
noted for medicinal virtues, best natural bath in State; swimming and 
boating; grand mountain scenery; good trout streams at door. 

First-Class Hotel and Stage Service. 

m. or 3:30 p. m. Terms $2 a day or $12 
J. F. Mulgrew, Proprietor. 

AGUA GALIENTE 
SPRINGS HOTEL 

Sonoma Valley, two hours from 
San Francisco via Tiburon ferry. 

Warm mineral swimming and tub 
baths. Water, gas, electric bells. 

$10 to$l2 per week, $2 per day. 

Address 

AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

Agua Caliente, Sonoma co 

Before going on your vacation drop a postal to 

HOBERG'S 

For foil particulars. LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 

Short drive to any of the famous mineral 
springs of Lake County. 




Mention this paper. 



$7 and $3 per wees 




THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM 

Thoroughly Equipped with all modern appliances for the relief of 
suffering humanity, all forms Water Treatment, the finest Static Gal- 
vanic Sinusoidal and Faradic Electrical apperatus, A Corps of well 
trained nurses of both sexes, skilled in all forms of treatments and 
manipulations, Rest Cure scientifically carried out. The iurest and 
best of foods manufactured and for sale. * * * A quiet, home like 
place, beautiful scenery. Mount Hamilton and the famous Lick Obser- 
vatory in plain view; one blook from eleotrlo cars, fifteen minutes walk 
from the oenter of the olty. Terms $8 to $20 per week, including medical 
attention and regular treatment. 

Garden City Sanitarium, EAST SAN JOSE Ctl 



July 8, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



Paso R0DI6S Soda Sprino. 



Pmo Roblcs Soda— fresh from bub 
bllag. effervescing sprint; - -com inn 
up from Nature's drug-store, com- 
poua,i ed and charged to cure the sick. 

This sparkiiok' beverage is served at 
the table — drink all you want of It. 
Puts an edge od your appetite, aids 
digestion and promotes nutrition 

OTTO E NEVER, Proprietor. 

Paso Robles.Cal 
City office. 6» Market street. 





PARAISO HOT 

SPRINGS 

MONTEREY CO., CAL. 

The Carlsbad o( America. For health, rest, 
pleasure, climate, accommodations, scenery, 
flowerbeds, cleanliness, table, hot soda and sulphur 
tub and plunge baths, massage treatment, special bath-houses For ladies 
and lady attendant, hunting and fishing, children's playground, croquet, 
lawn tennis, and dance hall. Grounds and cottages lighted by gas. For 
families, Paraiso stands unsurpassed in the State; plenty of enjoyment 
for young and old. Take train Third Hnd Townsend streets, San Francisco, 
9 a.m., and at Oakland from First and broadway at 9 : 10 a, m. dally for 
Soledad. Return-trip tickets $8 at S. P. office 6'3 Market street; seven 
milps by stage. Telephone and postofnee. For illustrated pamphlets and 
further Information address, J. PERRAULT. M D., Proprietor and Resi- 
dent Physician. 



BLIThEDALE 




AT THE FOOT OF MT. TAMALPAIS, 

MILL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA, 

Within an hour of San Francisco. 
Grounds comprise 160 acres 
Supplied with mountain spring water. 
Lighted by electricity. 
Golf links and tennis court! 
'Bus meets all trains. 

J. A. ROBINSON, LESSEE. 

Telephone ' Bllthedale." 



HOTEL MATEO and Cottages, San Mateo 



Cuisine Unsurpassed 
Climate Delightful 
Grounds Beautiful 



W. G. GRAHAM, Proprietor 



HOTEL BELVEDERE 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 

A superb resort. 30 minutes from San 

Francisco. 

Modern new hotel and cottages. 

Perfect service. 

Mrs. A. T. Moore 
Belvedere 

REDWOOD 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS 

One of the most beautiful spots in the heart of the Redwoods. 
Pine water, mineral springs, beautiful views, walks and drives. 
Altitude 1600 feet. Rates. $8 and »10 per week. Round trip from San 
Francisco to Laurel Station, Narrow Gauge, (2.60 
Write for particulars. .. „ _-„ „ . . 

M. S. COX, Proprietor 




HOTEL de 



HOTEL EL MONTE 



Los Gatos, Cal 

Santa Cruz Mountains 
Delightful climate; lovely drives; all large sunny rooms ; striotly first 
class; new management. American plan. ^^ ^^ propr , etor 



Strictly First-Class 

All Modern Improvements 

Electric Lights 

Liberal Rates 



-Hotel Lyndon 

Los Gatos, Cal. 



LYMAN H. TOLFREE, 

Proprietor. 



CYPRESS VILLA 

NOW OPEN 

B Street San Rafael, near Narrow Gauge 

This favorite resort has been newly furnished 
and has undergone an entire renovation- For 
families, tourists, and the public generally, 
the accommodations are unexcelled Board 
by day, week, or month. New management. 




W. P. Warbtjrton, Proprietor. 



SAMUEL SODA SPRINGS. 

Sure oure for dyspepsia, indigestion, rheumatism, and constipation. 
Hot mineral baths. These springs are looated in Napa County, twenty 
miles east of St. Helena. The water Is bottled at the springs, and contains 
its own natural gas. Stage leaves St. Helena. 

J. R. MORRIS, Proprietor, 

Napa County, Cal. 




The Discoverer of Rubicon Springs. 



RUBICON 
SODA SPRINGS 

On Rubicon River 10 miles from 
McKinney's. LAKE TAHOE. 

Primitive, clean home cooking. 
New management; new furnishing; 
new stages; GOOD HUNTING; flnefish- 
ing and boating on river and lakes; 
tb.p drive to the springs is the most 
picturesque lorest drive in Califor- 
nia. These springs are noted for 
medicinal value in stomach, liver, 
and kiiney troubles and relief for 
obesity. 

Rates. 810.50 to $12 a week. $2 aday. 
D. ABBOTT, MRS, T. B. SMITH, 
Manager. 



Be Take-lt-Ezu Swing 

Is a Hammock. S\Ying and 
Ghair combined. Perfect ease af- 
forded to the head, back and limbs. 
Changes position automatically by 
moving the Dody to the position de- 
sired. The swing balances no mat- 
ter what the position of the body. 
Used indoors, on the veranda, lawn, 
picnics and just the thing for camp- 
ers, Constructed of hardwood, mal- 
leable iron and fancy striped can- 
vas. Weighs 33 pounds. Guaranteed 
to hold 300 pouods. Can be folded 
into space required for a 6-foot step- 
ladder. Price $5 f o b.. San Fran- 
cisco. Money refunded if not as 
represented. 

Western Advertising Company 

313 Bush St., San Francisco 



m 



NTS 

AWNHN©, 
... F L 

Camp Furniture 




AMES&HARRi5,lnc ; ffiJlKSSS. 



21 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899. 



TO WHAT Bfl5E U5E5. 



BEYOND Dieppe is a fair country skirting a blue sea, 
and the poppies grow red and tall in the rustling 
wheat. The hedges are starred with blossoms and pow- 
dered with dust, for the highways are the roads of many. 

Half-way down the steep hill is a little hostel, a road- 
side inn. It has a face of flowers, and is pleasant; it 
smiles with the welcome of a courteous native to the casual 
straDger; it invites inspection; it suggests refreshment; 
and it disguises the materialistic form of its refreshment 
with the glamour of roses and a rustic porch. 

The day was hot, and I hesitated at the porch. The 
room inside looked cool; it had a stone floor and a latticed 
window, which was thrust open. Then I saw the flutter 
of a pink gown, and a silvery laugh came to me. I had a 
married sister waiting for me at Pourville, and I was al- 
ready late; but then, I argued, I always had a married 
sister, and she was generally waiting for me somewhere, 
for I am invariably late; and a pink gown, in conjunction 
with so silvery a laugh, was alluring. I went in. The 
sunlight outside was very bright, the half-light in the 
room was dim, and I stepped upon a dog — a pug-dog, I 
afterwards discovered — which resented my familiarity with 
his teeth. That destroyed the effect of my entrance. It 
produced a hurried exclamation and a balf-laugh, trans- 
lated into a cough. The exclamation came from me. I 
apologized profusely to the lady who had been indetermin- 
ate as to laugh or cough. She was, I saw, divinely small, 
a cool, sweet, innocent face, with mischief, however, lurk- 
ing in the eyes; a figure slight, willowy; an air of com- 
mand, and a dress inconceivable to an insular understand- 
ing — a mere dream of light frills, soft silks, and color. 

She drew herself up with some hauteur to the full ex- 
tent of her five feet four inches, from which I deducted 
two inches in consequence of a glance at her shoes. In 
the labor of buttoning a long glove she spoke. 

"Monsieur, I too must apologise. It was ill of Fido. 
It is pardonable that, in the heat of such a surprise, a man 
should say — should say what you said." 

"Yet to me it is a grief," I protested. 

"I," she went on, buttoning her glove, with her eyes 
fixed on me under the curtain of their long lashes, "I 
thought you were some one else." 

I hate to be taken for anybody else but myself — I like to 
keep the flattering hope that I am unique. I was piqued. 

" Madame," I answered, "I am sorry that I am not the 
other person." 

She looked at me for quite a while, which made me feel 
uncomfortable. At such moments I have always a misgiv- 
ing that my tie has wriggled. Then she smiled. The 
smile began in her eyes, spread to her lips, and finally took 
refuge in her teeth. I smiled too — from sympathy partly, 
and partly to show her that I bore her no ill-will for her 
mistake. 

"Does Monsieur generally enter an inn to tread upon 
little dogs?" I became aware that I had not summoned 
the landlord. I was also aware that I did Dot wish to 
summon the landlord. 

"I heard you laugh," I said. The fact seemed all elo- 
quent to me; it appeared so to her. 

"I was expecting some one. We had quarreled," she 
made reply. 

" He was to blame." 

" I have not said that it was a man." 

" It was unnecessary. You were good enough not to 
think me devoid of common sense." 

"He departed in anger." 

"A most ill-tempered man." 

" If I were in the wrong " 

"Which is a supposition very much strained." 

" I should be miserable, but as it is, I laugh." 

"And when you laugh the world stops at your window." 

" Monsieur is pleased to regard himself in a very flat- 
tering light I " 

"And I, as the only tangible object of the world, en- 
tered." 

"Ah!" 

She played a short solo upon the stone floor with the 
tap of her shoe; it was crescendo. Her brow — it was as 



marble for whiteness and as soft as rose leaves — wrinkled 
in thought, her lips — I hardly knew whether to bless the 
gods for permitting me a sight, or curse them for the hot 
temptation — puckered. She was evidently pondering. 

" It is," she said at length, "an unceremonious entrance." 

"It is an unceremonious introduction," I corrected; 
"the entrance was not unceremonious " 

" Unless to Fido." She laughed a little, and I began to 
find her laugh rather irritating — at times. "But the 
worst of it is there has been no introduction.'' 

"Does that matter?" I asked. For my part I was will- 
ing to forego such trivialities. 

" I do Dot know your name." 

" Nor I yours, so that is a bond of sympathy. Let us," 
I went on in a glow of inspiration, "imagine that we have 
been introduced at a dance. One never knows the names 
in such cases." 

" He was certainly to blame " 

"Certainly. If a man willingly walks out of Paradise he 
must be either a fool or " 

" But he will come back." 

"In that case " I began, rising, and taking up my 

hat from the chair. 

"Really," she answered, "a man who really walks out 
of " 

" But I don't," I objected. " I go with the greatest re- 
luctance." 

" It is very hot in the sun, Monsieur." 

" Madame, I greatly fear sunstroke. It is a disease 
which has had remarkable fatality for my family." 

I replaced my hat upon the chair on which I had pre- 
viously seated myself, and seated myself upon the chair 
on which I had previously placed my hat. That chair was 
nearer to Madame by over a foot. 

"Monsieur is prudent," she said, and smiled. I should 
have been perfectly happy if her gaze did not so often 
wander through the window frame and seek the sunshine 
outside. 

" Nay, I fear," I murmured, looking at her ardently, 
"imprudent." 

" That is hardly in the nature of a compliment." 

"Because," I went on boldly, "in the joy of a moment, 
a minute, an hour I peril my future peace." 

She beat another solo upon the floor, and again looked 
into the sunshine. My eyes followed the direction of hers, 
aDd I thought I saw a hat. The hat was severe, nay rigid; 
it was a masculine hat. 

" Is the peril so great?" she asked. She spoke so 
softly that I pushed my chair a little nearer to her and 
leant forward. 

"The answer is entirely in your hands, Madame," I said. 

"There may be no peril," she pouted, " for who knows 
what tree of love may spring from this mere grain of 
barely ten minutes?" 

She glanced at me sideways. 

" Have you noticed the roses at the window?" 

"No," I answered. "They are there, no doubt — roses 
are often at windows — but I have eyes for you only." 

"There is one — almost a bud. I covet it. I must 
have it." 

She rose and passed swiftly to the window. Again I 
thought I saw the hat. I stood behind her as she raised 
her ungloved hand: a dainty, slender, white band; a hand, 
that any man might not tire of kissiDg easily. She caught 
the bud, broke its stem, aDd gave a faint cry. 

"You have hurt yourself," I said. 

"A thorn," she answered hurriedly. "It has pricked 
me — it is still in, I fear." 

I took her hand in mine. I have had some experience of 
thorns in connection with little hands and I did not look 
for any deep wound, yet I must confess to some consider- 
able surprise when I found none at all, and even after 
minute search no visible impression upon the satin of her 
skin. 

" Madame," I said, falteringly, "I can see nothing." 

"Stupid," she cried pettishly, yet not loudly. "Look 
again — I tell you I have hurt my hand badly. You cannot 
see well. Hold it to the light." 

I held it to the light, I looked at it very carefully— the 
hand was really worth looking at — I bent lower over it, 
lower still. Then suddenly I glanced upwards. She wa 



July 8, 1899. 



SAM PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



*3 







Ittb Hoilt* tit limliiifinmr. 



smiling. I saw a challenge in her eyes. I kissed her hand. 

"Clotilde," said a voice over my head. It was a strange 
voice, and it seemed out in the garden, a little above me. 
I looked up and recognized the rigid, severe hat. Under 
the hat was a man. He looked bad-tempered when he 
regarded me; he looked penitent when he gazed upon 
Madame. 

"Henri," she cried, "I have a thorn in my finger. This 
gentleman is clumsy — he cannot discover it." 

She glanced at me scornfully, and stretched out her 
perfectly healthy hand to the owner of the rigid bat, who 
took it. Then, in that band, innocent of a scratch or a 
mark, he found a thorn, plucked it out, and kissed the 
place where it had been. I think, though, the wound was 
after all, not in her hand, and if I did not find it, I was 
not useless in the healing. 

Then suddenly I remembered that I had not summoned 
the landlord, and rectified my forgetfulness in a violent 
manner. When mine host entered, he was in time to see 
the rigid hat bending under a parasol somewhere down 
the road. 

"Ah, they have made it up again," he cried, with evi- 
dent satisfaction. "I am glad of that, for the wedding 
is to be in the early part of next week, and I am to sup- 
ply the wine for the ceremony." 

Every one seemed satisfiad but myself. I continued my 
walk to Pourville, having remembered my sister who was 
waiting. — Black and White. 

THE races given by the Golden Gate Driving Associa- 
tion at Oakland Track, last Tuesday, were largely at- 
tended and in every way successfully conducted. The 
afternoon was delightful, and the friends of the horse and 
of the Association were out in force. The last race was not 
over until nearly 7 o'clock. The club members are to be 
congratulated on the success of the afternoon's sport. 



Do you know that Smith's Dandruff Pomade has cured thousands 
of cases of dandruff, itching scalp, eczema and falling hair when all 
other remedies have failed? Price 50c at all druggists. Sample Free. 
Address Smith Bros., Fresno, Cal. 

Don't suffer with dyspepsia Baldwin's Dyspepsia Capsules, with 
Baldwin's Health Tablets, will oure. Ferry Drug Store, 8 Market street. 



CELEBRATION OF THE FOURTH OF JIKY. 

THAT the Glorious Fourth has this year been celebrated 
in the good old fashioned way, goes, of course, with- 
out saying. The signs were evident on every hand that, 
while olt people may be divided among themselves as to 
the wisdom of expanding their territory so as to take in 
alien races and foreign lands, they were never more in 
love with their own dear land, as it is, than they are to- 
day. Considering, however, that it is a war year, less 
jubilation over battles fought and victories won, was mani- 
fested than might have been expected. Much more was 
said of the grand principles of liberty on which this Re- 
public was founded, and upon which it must endure, than 
was advanced in regard to the feats of arms that have dur- 
ing the past year shed so much renown upon our soldiers 
and sailors. That was as it should be. However proud 
we may feel of our military achievements, it is highly pro- 
per, in celebrating our Natal day, that the immortal de- 
claration of principles which gave us birth, should be held 
to be still paramount. Our forefathers, the founders of 
our liberties, their Declaration of Independence, and the 
Constitution of the United States, owned the day, and it is 
to be devoutly prayed that they may continue to own it as 
long as the eternal ages roll. Whilst Fourth of July cele- 
brations are maintained, and made to recall the doings of 
the early fathers, it is hardly likely that we shall forget 
whence we came, what we have inherited, or the principles 
of our National being, on other days of the year. 

At Burlingame the Fourth was celebrated by the loyal 
B'linghamites in various out-door sports. The morning 
was devoted to pigeon-shooting for a loving-cup offered by 
the club. The entries were : F. W. Tallant, W. H. How- 
ard, W. B. Tubbs, A. C. Tubbs, H. von Schroeder, D. Drys- 
dale, H. Fortman, Prince Poniatowski, A. von Schroeder, 
F. J. Carolan, W. S. Hobart, P. D. Martin. Major Rath- 
bone was master of ceremonies and J. K. Orr referee. 
The contest was won by Mr. Howard. Pony races fol- 
lowed, in which A. von Schroeder, Ollie Tobin, C. Dunphy, 
J. O. Tobin, Frank Carolan and Walter Hobart took part. 
The three-sixteenth mile race was won by Ollie Tobin. The 
second race was five-eighths of a mile and was won by 
Walter Hobart, C. Dunphy second. This was followed by 
a mule race, in which six gentlemen participated, Mr. Ho- 
bart winning. The track events ended with a mile and a 
half hurdle, between J. O. Tobin and Von Schroeder, the 
baron coming in first handily. Polo closed the sport. 
Three periods were played, Mr. Hobart. Ollie Tobin and 
Mr. Martin against Ed Tobin, Mr. Dunphy and Mr. Dris- 
col, and the last-named won, 7 to 3 goals. 



You never have a 
"AA" Whiskey. 



'head" in the morning from drinking Jesse Moore 




Contestants in the Eurltugame Pigeon tihoot. 



24 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

BANKING. 



July 8, 1899. 



"lam not at all certain," said the fataer, "that my 
daughter loves you sufficiently to warrant me in intrusting 
her to your keeping for that." "Well," replied the young 
man, "perhaps you haven't had Lhe same advantages for 
observing things as I have."— Philadelphia North Ameri- 
can. 

Young Mistress — I don't see why you should leave me so 
suddenly. I'm sure I've done all I could to help you with 
the housework, and I have done all the cooking. Maid — 
Yes'm, that's what's the matter. "What is?" "I can't 
stand y'r cooking." — New York Weekly. 

A Testimonial. Little boy (writing to his schoolmaster) 
—Everybody at home is delighted with the progress I have 
made at your school. Why, when I came to you I knew 
nothing, and now, even in this short time, I know ten 
times as much! 

"Will one in the class," asked the teacher of rhetoric, 
"give a better form to the sentence, 'John can ride the 
mule if he wants to?'" "John can ride the mule if the 
mule wants him to," said the boy with the bad eye. — 
Chicago Tribune. 

Saleslady— Oh, yes; we have this goods in aU the newest 
shades; it's very pretty, but it won't wash. Fair 
Customer — That won't make any difference, as I only want 
it for a bathing suit; give me a yard, please. — Philadelphia 
Record. 

Mrs. Jones— Where's Mary? Mr. Jones— I sent her to 
find out where the escape of gas was. Mrs. Jones — Did 
she tell you how it came to explode? Mr. Jones — No. 
Mrs. Jones — How's that? Mr. Jones — She hasn't come 
back yet. 

"My father supports my mother properly." "Pooh! 
My mother can carry my father right out of the room." 
"That's nothing. My father can go out of the room by 
himself, and not come home for days, so there! silly kid." 

Little Johnny — Man: a, let's play I am your mother and 
you are my little boy. Mama — Very well, dear; how shall 
we play it? "I'll tell you; you start to do something and 
'11 tell you not to." — Puck. 

The Filipino envoy came, but under a flag of truce. "Is 
Col. Funston with you?" he asked hoarsely. "He is." 
"Then we ask for a start of five miles before the battle 
begins." — Boston Advertiser. 

" I don't think 'time is money' do you." "No. I usually 
have time to spare." "Man proposes," he began, "and 

" "Well," she interrupted, "and why don't you?" 

And he did. 

Clerk— I am only waiting for you to raise my salary, sir, 
to get married. Employer — Then don't expect it. I 
think too much of you. 

"What was it happened to Mrs. Nibber?" "She fell out 
of the window while trying to see who was sitting on her 
next neighbor's porch." — Chicago Record. 

King's Daughter — Mercy! Do you allow that half -grown 
girl to read Zola and Ouida? The Mother — I must do 
something to keep her away from the daily newspapers. 

"The Overland Limited," via Chicago, Union Pacific, and 
Northwestern Line. 
Only three and one-half days to Chicago. Four and one-half days 
to New York. Pullman Vestibuled Sleepers. Pullman Dining Cars. 
Pullman Tourist Sleepers. The "Overland Limited" leaves San 
Francisco every day in the year at 6 p. m. Cabin reservations made 
and steamship tickets sold to all parts of Europe. For full particu- 
rars and sleeper reservations address D. W. Hitchcock, General 
Agent, No. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

One application of Smith's Dandruff Pomade stops itching scalp; 
three to six applications removes all dandruff. Try it. Price 50 
cents, at all druggists. Sample free. Address Smith Brothers, 
Fresno, Cal. 

One cannot love too much of a good thing— Napa Soda, for instance. 



Bank of British Columbia. { h^ ei XYo& s SSZZl?& 

Capital Paid Up J3.0O0.OO0 Reserve Fund 1 500,000 

bead OFFICE. 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vanoouver, New Westminster, K am loops, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson Rosslaad, Sandon, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon Its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of 'Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico: 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon District, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue 
drafts and Letters of Credit on that Bank at above point, and transact 
other banking business. Terms upon application. 

The flnrjIo-Galitornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 16,000,000 

Subscribed 8,000,000 

Paid Up 1,500,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cob. Pine add Sansome Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars. London, E. G. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broadstreet. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of oredit available throughout the 

world. Sends bllU for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IQN. STEINHART 1 Ma .„,,_ r _ 

P. N. LILIENTHAL f Mana K erB 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 
J as. K. Wilson, President. E. A. Bruodierb, Vice-President. 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital 1500,000 

Directors: Jas.K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pieroe Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope, E. A. Bruguiere, John Barton, C. S. Benedict. 

Agents: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia — Drexel & 
Co. Chicago — Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London — Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Pald-Up Capital t 300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY. Cashier JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President 

C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert MoElroy 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co. , or Exohang 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Securitu Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 
LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L. Aboot Jr. a. H Hewlett 

Wm. Baboook O D. Baldwin E. J. MoCutchu. 

Adam Grant W. S Jones R. H. Pease 

Continental Building & Loan Association of California. 

Established in 1889. 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital, 88,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund 1175,000 

Paid-in Capital - - - 1,810,000 Monthly Income, over - - 75,000 

Dr. Ed. E Hill, President. capt. Oliver Eldridge, Vice-President 
Wm. Corbin Secretary and General Manager. 

Grocker- Wool worth National Bank of S. F. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post streets. 

Paid-Up Capital 81,000.000 

WM . H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

W. GREGG Jr Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E. Brown, C. E. Green, G. W. 
Kline, Hy. J. Crocker, G. W. Scott. 

Germania Trust Go. of San Francisco i\™™TT ry 

Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, $375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administra or. Guardian, or Trustee. 
Check Accounts of Individuals, Firms, and C> rporatious solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
Paid on Trust Deposits and Savings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clientB 

Board of Direotors— Ernst A. Denicke. P. Kronenberg, J. C. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro, F. C. Stebe, Albert G. Wieland. H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H 
Bninner, 

Officers— Erbst A. Denioke, President, P. Kronenberg, Vice-p esideni 
H. Brunner. Cashier. 




SAX FRANC I \VS LETTER. 

71 






RETIREMENT —from ''poms of henri tiirod 

PUBLISHERS 



HOUGHTON, HIFFUN A CO , 



M 



Y gentle friend! 1 bold no creed so false 
As that which dares to teach that we are born 
For battle only, and that in this life 
The soul, if it would burn with starlike power, 
Must needs forsooth be kindled by the sparks 
Struck from the shock of clashing human hearts. 
There 19 a wisdom that grows up in strife. 
And one — [ liko it best — that sits at home 
And learns its lessons of a thoughtful ease. 
So cornel a lonely house awaits thee!— there 
Nor praise, nor blame shall reach us, save what love 
Of knowledge for itself shall wake at times 
In our own bosoms; come! and we will build 
A wall of quiet thought, and gentle books, 
Betwixt us and the hard and bitter world. 
Sometimes — for we need not be anchorites— 
A distant friend shall cheer us through the Post, 
Or some Gazette— of course no partisan- 
Shall bring us pleasant news of pleasant things; 
Then, twisted in graceful allumettes, 
Each ancient joke shall blaze with genuine flame 
To light our pipes and candies; but to wars. 
Whether of words or weapons, we shall be 
Deaf — so we twain shall pass away the time 
E'en as a pair of happy lovers, who, 
Alone, within some quiet garden-nook, 
With a clear night of stars above their heads, 
J ust hear, betwixt their kisses and their talk, 
The tumult of a tempest rolling through 
A chain of neighboring mountains ; they awhile 
Pause to admire a Hash that only shows 
The smile upon their faces, but, full soon, 
Turn with a quick, glad impulse, and perhaps 
A conscious wile that biings them closer yet, 
To dally with their own fond hearts, and play 
With the sweet flowers that blossom at their feet. 



LOVE'S SEASON — rene s- parks, in the bookman- 

When is Love's season of bloom, my dear? 

Is it when buttercups gild the field 
And violets delicate perfume yield? 

—True love lasteth through all the year 1 

When is Love's season of bloom, my dear? 

Is it when roses their sweets unfold 
And the lily reveals her heart of gold? 

—True love lasteth through all the year! 

When is Love's season of bloom, my dear? 

Is it when maples are vivid red 
And oak leaves brown on the earth outspread? 

—True Love lasteth through all the year ! 

When is Love's season, of all the year? 

Is it when snow on the ground lies white 
And stars pierce the sky with keen, cold light? 

— True Love blooms everywhere you are, dear ! 



THE FLIGHT OF YOUTH—/; «■ stoddard- 

There are gains for all our losses, 

There are balms for all our pain; 
But when youth, the dream, departs, 
It takes something from our hearts, 
And it never comes again. 

We are stronger, and are better, 

Under,manhood's sterner reign ; 
Still we feel that something sweet 
Followed youth, with flying feet, 

And will never come again. 
Something beautiful is vanished, 

And we sigh for it in vain : 
We behold it everywhere, 
On the earth, and in the air, 

But it never comes again. 



GRAY BROS., 



US Montgomery St., S T. 

905 New High St.. Lou Angeles 



Concrete and . . . 
Artificial Stone Work. 



CITY STREET I/IPROVEMENT CO., 

FIFTH FLOOR MILLS BUILDING. S. F. 



Proprietors 

Bitumen nines. 

Santa Cruz and King City, 
Monterey County, Cal 



Contractors for all kinds 
of street work, bridges, 
and railway construc- 
tion, wharves, jetties 
and seawalls. 



BANKING. 



Bank of California, San Francisco. 

Capital, 13,000,000 Surplus, $1,000,000 

Proflt and Loss Account, January 1, 1899, $3,159,928 

WILLIAM ALVORD.. . ..President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vlce-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith... Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 3d Ass'tCashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N.B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— National Shaw- 
mut Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis — Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M.Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres. Berlin— Direction der Disconto Gesellsohaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

533 California Street. 

Deposits, Jan. 1,1899 834,074,796 Reserve Fund S1W.365 

Paid-Up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund .. 469,668 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. R. M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors: George W. Beaver, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, Al- 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, George 
Tashelra, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms and 
Farming Lands in the Country 

Receives Deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank 1 commences only with the 
receipt cf the money. 

No charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. , and Saturday evenings, for reoeipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

The German Savings and Loan Societu. 

No. 536 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Franctsoo 

Guarantee capital and surplus $3 163.146 40 

Capital actually paid up In cash.. 1,000 000 00 

i Deposits December 31, 1898 37,289,195 73 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-Presi- 
dent, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President , H, Horstman; Cashier, A. H. 
R Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George 
Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; General Attorney, W. S. 
Goodfellow. 

Ign. Steinhart, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. Walter, N. Ohland 
and John Lloyd- 

Wells Fargo & Go. Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansomb & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth .. . Cashier 

F. L. Ltpman -Assistant Cashier 

H. I.. Miller 3d Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus.... 86.a6u.UU0 

BRANCHES. 

N. Y City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or.. R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, John 

Bermlngham. Dudley Evans. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cor. Sansome & Setter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 83,500,000 

Paid Up Capital 82,000,000 

ReserveFund $ 850,000 

Head Office. 40 Threadneedle Street , London, E. C . 

AGENTS New York— Agenoy of the London, Paris, and Amerloan 

Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cle 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the prinoipal cities ol the 
world. Commercial and Travelers- atfgg™^^ 

C. ALTSOHUL } Manager.. 



26 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1899. 




A Bachelor's Room. The perspective sketch of the 

inglenook printed on this page is a 

scheme of decoration for a bachelor's room, as designed by 

The Studio. As the plan shows, the seats are set at a 

considerably acute angle to the fireplace, giving a feeling 



THE spacious show windows of J. J. O'Brien & Co., 
fronting on Market and Jones streets, contain a most 
attractive display of midsummer goods, including laces, 
ribbons, ladies' underwear, ladies' tailor-made suits and 
boys' and children's clothing, the last-mentioned line con- 
stituting a new department of this old-established house. 
The display of ribbons, laces, and real ostrich feather boas 
in O'Brien's windows is particularly noticeable, as the 
goods are of fine quality and are marked at inviting prices. 
Gentlemen's neckwear in great variety is one of the 
specialties of this establishment. 

Vehy latest things in the art world are to be seen at Morris', 248 
Sutter street. New and artistic articles are continually arriving. 
Special attention given to framing. Sole agent for Moulton's cele- 
brated photographs. 







Scheme of Decoration for a Bachelor's Room. 

of greater cosiness and privacy than if placed at right 
angles; the floor is of deep-toned brick; slightly raised in 
level from the floor of the room, the same colored bricks 
surround the grate, between which and the woodwork of 
the seats is a similarly toned terracotta framework, the 
jambs of which are relieved by pillared niches on either 
side. Above the oaken mantelshelf is a frieze of blue and 
white tiles running up to the cupboard, which extend up- 
wards to the heavy beam which runs across the room. 
Above this, again, is a frieze of green-tinted plaster. On 
either side of the fireplace are convenient cupboards for 
pipes and so forth, the doors decorated in a conventional 
pattern executed in colored gesso, while gesso panels also 
enrich the door of the cupboards above the blue-tiled 
frieze. The hood to the fireplace and the electric light 
fittings are in copper. One of the latter, of which a sketch 
is given, is original but fitting in design. 



The Judge — Now, then, my good man, please be explicit. 
At what point did you enter the altercation? Witness — 
I didn't get into the altercation. I had only got as far as 
the anteroom when dat red nose feller over there hit me 
wit a chair. 

When the cats are away the rats will play. When the Madam is 
in the country on her summer vacation is just the time to have your 
carpets taken up, cleaned beautifully and relaid by Spaulding's Carpet 
Cleaning Works at 353 Tehama street. Only experienced workmen 
and the most improved machinery employed. Prices reasonable. 



At Cafe Zinkand the beat supper is always served, and an excell- 
ent orchestra discourses the very latest and choicest selections. 
After the theatre the cafe is crowded with delighted people. 



A place of interest for visitors is the Gump Art Gallery of Paint- 
ings, by European masters. No. 113 Geary street. 



July 8, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



NSURANCE 



THE Board of Supervisors of the City of San Francisco 
are considering the following recommendation of the 
fire committee: "All buildings of brick, stone, or both 
materials, excepting those already erected and used as 
stores, mills, warehouses or manufactories, which are more 
than two stories or twenty-five feet in height, shall have 
fire-proof doors, blinds or shutters on every window or 
opening on a street within thirty feet of any opposite 
building. If these doors, blinds or shutters are of wood, 
they must be covered with one-eighth-inch coating of 
asbestos, and then by tin plate. 

General Manager Cream of the National of Dublin has 
returned to Ireland. 

The Girard Fire and Marine is again doing business in 
Washington. 

Ira C. Wood has been appointed receiver of the Mer- 
chants' National of Chicago. 

The Pelican Fire has been admitted to Colorado. 

Christian Prensier, who died on the 6 th inst., had been 
president of the Milwaukee Mechanics' Fire Insurance 
Company since 1854, and was 73 years of age at the time 
of his death. 

The North German of New York is licensed to do busi- 
ness in California. 

Mr. Godwin of the Preferred, left on the 20th instant for 
a two weeks' visit to his Northwestern agencies. The Pre- 
ferred's semi-annual statement of June 30th will show a 
large gain over that of December 31st, '98. Mr. Godwin 
states that the Preferred is doing a splendid business with 
its new health policy. We are not surprised at this state- 
ment, as this progressive company has the reputation of 
offering only the oest to its patrons. 

For more than thirty years Rodney Dennis, whose death 
is chronicled this month, was connected in an official capa- 
city with the Travelers' Insurance Company until his 
resignation about three years ago. He was born in 
Massachusetts in 1826 and began his insurance career as 
secretary of the Travelers in 1864. Mr. Dennis was a man 
of sterling character and left a name to be revered. 
t The Pacific Mutual Life did twice the amount of busi- 
ness in its accident department last month that was done 
in May, 1898. 

The Press is authority for the statement that two com- 
panies — personal accident and employers' liability — are to 
be organized in the State of Washington. 

The Pacific Surety Company has been licensed in 
Indiana and will enter Massachusetts and New York. 
Martin L. Case will be the Massachusetts representativee 

Another large fire in Tacoma, Wash. When such fires 
occur and no attempt is made to rebuild, the town may be 
regarded as dead, and business in that locality undesir- 
able. 

Nothing has been learned of the whereabouts of E. W. 
Spaulding, the Firemans' Fund defaulting cashier, since 
his mysterious disappearance two months ago. 

No man glories in the fact that he is bald; take warning in time if 
your scalp itches, it is just a reminder that you will sooner or later 
become bald. Use Smith's Dandruff Pomade, the only positive cure 
for itching scalp. 

MOTHBRs.be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 
children while teethiner ^^ 

Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

HOME INSURANCE 00. OF NEW YORK 25VMi8& 

H. L. Roff, General Agent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents. 

210 Sarsome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well organized, competent, and experienced force of Gen- 
eral ttnd special Agents resident ia the Pacific Coa^t States, ensuriog 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the in* 
•■ :ng public, and immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pay- 
ment opLosses^ 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 'VSS™ 

Total Assets 27S S 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,112,648 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 

COLIN M. BOYD. fffSSSSSStfSS: 





l '& 



Capital Subscribed $4,482,780 

LONDON ASSURANCE, capital p.id up 2,2*1,378 

Assets ,9, 186,148 

Capital Subscribed $6,000,000 

OCEAN MARINE. capital paid u P soo.ooo 

Assets 2.602,060 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OP SAN FRANCISCO CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 

SOLID 8ECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCE* 

OHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 489 California St., S. F. 

FIB! INSURANCE. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. LIMITED 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 18,700,000 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 816 California St., S. F 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Gompanu ol Nortn America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PBNN. 

Pald-iip Capital 18,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6,088,018 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1726, 

Capital Paid Up, $8,446,100. Assets, 128,870,8511. 

Surplus to Policy Holders, 19,851 924. 

FRANK W DICKSON, Ass't Manager. 

501-503 Montgomery St., corner Saoramento. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY, of new Zealand. 

Capital $5,000,000 

UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS. 
Offlce in company's building, 312 California street. 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager. 
Hooker & Lent. City Agents, 14 Post street. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON swished im 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. ^corporate* 1799 

BUTLER & H ALDAN, General Agents , 

418 California St., S. F. 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GEKMANY 

Capital, 12,250.000 Assets, 810,984.248. 

Paoiao Coast Department: 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 



38 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 8, 1899. 



MRS. POTTER-PALMER AND THE PRINCESS. 



EDITOR News Letter : Nothing has occurred abroad, 
for some time, at least, of a social character, which 
has so raised the ire of foreign papers as the tit-for-tat 
administered by Mrs. Potter-Palmer to the Princess Eu- 
lalie. The friends of the fair Chicagoan in New York, 
however— and they are both numerous and rich — stoutly 
vindicate the diamond-decked priestess of Chicago fashion, 
and allude to the visit of the Infanta to this country in 
1893, and the alleged snub delivered to the American 
women at that time, in justification of Mrs. Palmer's 
recent social solar plexus blow. At the risk of relating 
ancient history — which, however, has not before been pub- 
lished, I will relate just what did happen at Chicago ; 

At the Palmer residence, where the Infanta had been 
invited to meet a "few," nearly a thousand guests were 
in waiting. They were packed in like sardines, but barred 
off from crowding against the royal guests by red and yel- 
low ribbons. Mrs. Palmer was gowned magnificently in 
white brocade with ropes of pearls and diamonds and her 
famous crown of jewels, to do honor to the Princess — 
gowned, in fact, as the Infanta could not afford to gown 
herself. When Princess Eulalie passed down the ribboned 
passage-way, after baviDg been met at the entrance by 
her host and hostess, there were those present who felt 
that it was in questionable taste for Mrs. Palmer to so 
outshine her guest in the matter of toilette. 

A sort of throne had been erected, and to this the Prin- 
cess was escorted, and Prince Antoine took up his posi- 
tion back of her chair. Then Mrs. Palmer brought up 
one after another to present to her royal guests, without 
first having asked their permission. These people, after 
the presentation, instead of passing on through the room, 
banked themselves around the walls to stare, and as stare 
they did, the foot of the Princess began to pat the red vel- 
vet rug. Her brow knitted, and the most casual observer 
could see that her nerves were getting beyond her con- 
trol. Suddenly she signified a wish to be relieved from 
the painful situation. Mrs. Palmer took her into a little 
room adjoining the conservatory, and from there her car- 
riage was ordered. A banquet had been laid with most 
elaborate care, but the Princess would not stay. At half- 
past eleven she was out of the house. 

During these days there were constant rumors of the 
rudeness of the Princess to Mrs. Palmer in refusing to 
stop for the banquet, and the next afternoon it was re- 
marked that the Palmer box was vacant at the concert 
given in honor of the Princess in Festival Hall. But the 
Princess soon came in and stayed but two minutes. The 
truth of the matter is, the Princess is not made of the stuff 
that enjoys any conventionality. She was happier run- 
ning around the Midway, drinking beer in Old Vienna, 
smoking cigarettes somewhere else, and having what she 
considered a general good time in her own way. She 
objected to being placed on exhibition, but she stood it as 
long as she could and then she bolted. She had no idea of 
snubbing Mrs. Palmer. If Mrs. Palmer did not care to 
meet the Infanta again, it is more than likely that, this 
time, it was the woman that Mrs. Palmer considered, and 
not the Princess. 

Speaking of Mrs. Palmer brings to mind the proposed 
marriage of her niece to the Russian Prince Kantakusin. 
It is said Grandam Grant is not enamored of the foreign 
alliance; and surely no one can wonder at her disinclina- 
tion to wed her grandchild abroad. The story of Nellie 
Grant Sartoris lingers in the recollection of every Ameri- 
can. That was a match which the great General reluc- 
tantly yielded to, and its unhappy sequel showed how 
secure were the grounds of his objection. 

I observe that not all grand opera ventures are finan- 
cial failures. On the 11th of April the stockholders of 
the Grau Opera Company declared a dividend of 35 per 
cent; but this has been added to by a second dividend of 5 
per cent cash and 10 per cent of stock. 
New York, June 3, 1899. Passe-Partout. 



Ladies do not have to wear switches to cover up their defects if 
they use Smith's Dandruff Pomade in time, it cures dandruff, itch- 
ing scalp, stops falling bair and makes hair grow. Price 50c at all 
druggists. 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda before breakfast. 



SHAKE INTO YOUR SHOES ^VT^r^; 

smarting, nervous feet, 
and Ingrowing nails, and instantly takes the sting out of corns and bunions 
It's the greatest comfort discovery of the age. Allen's Foot-Ease makes 
tight or new shoes feel easy. It is a certain cure for sweating, callous 
and hot, tired, aching feet. Try It to-day. Sold by all druggists and shoe 
stores. £>y mail for 25c. in stamps. Trial package FREE. Address, 
Allen S. Olmsted, Le Roy, N. Y. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank 
For the half year ending June 30, 1899, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of three (3) per cent, per an 
num. free of taxes, payable on and after July 1, 1*99. 

S. L. ABBOT JR.. Secretary 
Office— 232 Montgomery street, Mills Building. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the half year ending 
June 30. 1899, at the rate of three and eighty-four one hundredths {3 84) per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and three and twenty hundredths 13 20) 
per cent per annum on. Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 
after Saturday, July 1, 1899. Dividends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of dividend as the principal from and after July 1, 1S99. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, cor Sutter, p-an Francisco Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending with .lune 31, 1899, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four i4) per cent per annum on term deposits, and three 
and one-third (3 1 3j per cent per annum on ordinary deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1. 1899 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office: 636 California street, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending June 30. 1899. a dividend has been declared at 

the rate of three and six tenths (3 6) per cent per annum on all deposits, 

free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday. July I, I8J9. 

GEORGE R STORY, Cashier. 
Office: 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California 
Has declared for the six months ending June 30. 1899. a dividend of 6 per 
oent per annum on ordinary deposits, 7 per cent on one year term deposits. 
10 per cert on Class "F" stock, and 14 per cent to Class "A" stock. 
DR. ED. E. HILL. President Capt. OLIVER ELDRIDGE 

WM. CORBIN, Secretary. Vice-President 

Office: 222 Sansome St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

Hiberma Savings and Loan Society. 

Office of cne Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, June 2*, 1899. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one third (3H) per cent, per annum on all 
deposits for the six months ending June 3u, 1899, free from all taxes, 
and payable on and after July l, 1899. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment . No. 86 

Amount per share 10 centB 

Levied May 2, 1899 

Delinquent in office July 6 1899 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock July 27,1899 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office — Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 *icntgumery streets, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
oanners. dyers, Hour-mills, foundries, launurlei 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factorie* 
■ table men, tai-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St., S. F Tel. 5610. 

BLAKE, MOFFIT & TOWNE EJffgE" 

Dealers In . . PftPER 



Blake, Mofflt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake. McFall & Co.. Portland, Or. 



65, 57, 59, 01 First St 



ST. LAWRENCE 



LIVERY AND 

SALES STABLE 

W. E. Bridge, Proprietor 

428 Post St,, between Powell and Mason. 
San Franoisco. Telephone, No. 1323. 




o\ 

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Pries per Opt. I* Cents 



EBTABU8HED JULY 20, 18M. 




NEWS|iE'TTER 




Vol. LVIX. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 15, 1899. 



Number 2. 



Prinlrd and published every Saturday by the proprUlor. FRK1I MARRIOTT 
6)4 Kearny street. San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post, 
office a* Second-class Matter. 

TKs office of the NEWS LETTER in Sew York City it at Temple Court, 
{Geo. A. Kellogg, Eastern Representative), where information maybe 
obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

All social items, announcements, advertising, or other matter, intended for 
publication in the current number of the NEWS LETTER, should be 
sent to this office not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 

LITERARY folk would build a monument to Eugene 
Field. Bread for the poet's family, however, were 
better than a stone to his memory. 

OAKLAND'S Church of the Advent is under Marshall 
Law no more. Sweet peace has settled down upen 
the congregation, and there is excellent order in the ab- 
sence of Law. 

IF the report be true that Admiral Dewey is a declared 
opponent of the war against the Filipinos, the fact is as 
highly creditable to his sense of right as the battle of 
Manila Bay was to his heroism. 

RUSSIA has decided to abandon the Julian calendar and 
adopt the Gregorian. The old-fashioned calendar is 
now twelve days behind the one in universal use, and the 
Czar is eager to get abreast of the times. 



THE Kaiser praised the French cadets, Loubet com- 
mended the Kaiser's judgment, France passed the lov- 
ing-cup to Germany, and now we shall hear little more of 
the Alsace-Lorraine matter until after the Paris Exposi- 
tion of 1900. 

BIBLICAL students have shown that $50,000,000 was 
the value of Solomon's temple. It remains for the 
enterprising journalist to dig up the Hebrew record of the 
actual cost and reveal to this virtuous age how Solomon 
was robbed by the contractors. 

THE hymn of welcome to Admiral Dewey will be sung 
by the combined German singing societies of Greater 
New York, while Captain Coghlan's internationally-famous 
recitation will be dispensed with. Many and varied are 
the compensations of Time. 

POOR old Steinitz, once the world's invincible chess- 
master, ended eleventh at the international tourney 
in London; while young Lasker, who was the first to dis- 
pute the former's supremacy, has now established himself 
as champion, without a dangerous rival in the field. 

ftSTROLOGIST Scribner avers that Tsama watermel- 
lons will flourish on the American desert. Then let 
the baked plains of the southwest be Tsama-sowed, sliced 
up into melon-patches and opened for colored pre-emp- 
tion, and then the negro question is solved. 

S WOMAN flagged an express train at Vallejo junction, 
and a sensational newspaper exaggerates the incident 
into a sort of triumph over the railroad company. Fair- 
ness and common-sense would suggest that the trainmen 
be applauded for their spirit of accommodation. 

LET the Supervisorial majority beware of crippling the 
fire service of the city. The pruning-knife of econ- 
omy may with safety be applied to other branches of the 
municipal government. The City Hall is not yet bereft of 
its examples of political pets waxing sleek in salaried indo- 
lence. 



BECAUSE John J. Valentine raised his voice in behalf of 
human rights, contracted "expansionists," disguised 
as patriots, are wild in their demand to have him punished. 
Never before, in the history of the republic, have Ameri- 
cans been threatened with persecution for daring to speak 
in defense of the honor and glory of the flag. 

SENATOR Charles W. Fairbanks, of Indiana, after a 
careful investigation of the Alaskan boundary ques- 
tion, maintains that no valid reason exists for giving Can- 
ada a port on the seaboard of our northern territory. 
The covetous "Lady of the Snows" will never wheedle her 
Uncle Samuel into surrendering the ice-pack to make her 
"Queen of all the Glaciers." 

FRENCHMEN yesterday waved their hats in air and 
sang the songs of liberty. It was the epoch-making 
Fourteenth of July, anniversary of the red storm that 
changed the history of France and of the world — day when 
the patriot, inspired by "the memory of bis father's 
wrongs and the hope of his children's rights," ended in 
blood and fire the history of the Bastile. 

EDWIN MARKHAM'S reputation as a prophet is en- 
dangered by Lady Warwick's scheme to teach women 
the science of farming. It is possible that "in the dread 
hour" of future reckoning the "masters, lords and rulers 
in all lands," kneeling for terms at the feet of the Amazon- 
ian spade-wielder, will secretly wish that Lady Warwick 
had never taken the job out of the hands of the man with 
the hoe. 



PROGRESS waves her magic wand in the Orient, and 
China's great wall — world-wonder of twenty centuries — 
is doomed to a place in history among the things that were. 
The Dowager Empress has decreed that this monument 
to the stupidity of the ancients of her race shall be torn 
down and its material used to build levees along the rivers 
which yearly devastate the most fertile valleys of the 
celestial empire. 

BOUND for the north pole is an expedition under the 
Duke of Abruzzi. Intellectual and brave, energetic 
and full of the spirit of adventure, familiar with the work 
of exploration in icy wilds, and equipped with everything 
that science could suggest or ingenuity supply, this young 
man of gentle blood, who was the first to set foot on the 
summit of Mount St. Elias, may solve a problem of the 
ages by carrying the standard of Savoy to the northern 
extremity of the earth's axis. 

IT was a strange sense of humor that impelled the San 
Francisco Health Board to throw the Nippon Maru into 
a long and costly quarantine on the gratuitous assumption 
that certain Japanese drowned in an attempt to swim 
from the vessel were afflicted with the bubonic plague. 
The board members must have laughed themselves into 
fits when they reported the discovery of plague-bacilli, 
and similar ecstacy must have been theirs when they per- 
petrated that other howling joke by sending in answer to 
the demand of the Marine Hospital Service (as proof of 
the Japanese case) a specimen of the genuine bubonic 
plague germs which they had in store for scientific pur- 
poses. The Marine Hospital doctor refused to credit 
the authenticity of the specimen, and the Board nearly 
split itself with fun. These professional jesters had fooled, 
not only themselves, but the MariEe Hospital Service, the 
Nippon Maru, the newspapers and the people. Time was 
when medicine was a serious profession. That was when 
fools knew their places. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1899. 



THE LIBERTY OF THE PRESS AND THE CITIZEN. 



THE attitude of the News Letter toward the military 
operations now being conducted by the United States, 
has attracted the commendation of many citizens and 
aroused the antagonism of others. Holding as we do that 
the war with the Philippine Islands might with honor have 
been averted and millions in treasure and thousands of 
lives of brave men saved; believing that the fundamental 
principles upon which the fabric of our country stands 
have been flagrantly violated, humanity outraged and the 
eternal principles of justice, of freedom and of equal 
right, as set out in the Declaration of Independence, in 
our Constitution, and in the recent utterances of the Chief 
Executive of the nation and of Congress, have been disre- 
garded and stultified — believing these things, from the 
first the News Letter has not failed, with whatever dig- 
nity and strength it possesses, to condemn this war of un- 
, fortunate and unjust conquest. Other papers — notably 
the Call, the Bulletin and the Argonaut, which originally 
supported the Administration's policy of expansion, have 
repented their folly, and are silent or are sturdily oppos- 
ing it. 

We have not been unmindful of the fact that some tem- 
porary financial gain to the mercantile community has re- 
sulted from the war. Quantities of material, supplies, 
etc., have been forwarded to the islands via San Francisco, 
and other quantities have been sold by the dealers in this 
city. No doubt, from a strictly pecuniary point cf view, 
the struggle in the Philippines has been a benefit to this 
community. But when the gains have been measured and 
marshaled against the wrongs, the sufferings, and the 
monstrous injustices that have marked the applied policy 
of imperialism, they are as nothing. Wrong cannot be 
condoned by the purchase of prosperity, and the fact that 
military operations against the half-naked Filipinos, with 
the following losses of life and national treasure, have re- 
sulted in added activity in the commercial life of a great 
city cannot affect the living truth by the diameter of a single 
hair. 

From time to time there have appeared in these 
columns vigorous and unanswerable articles written by 
Mr. John J. Valentine, in which the policy of the Adminis- 
tration has been sharply arraigned. These articles have 
in no case exceeded the truth. They have pointed out 
with business-like directness the false pretenses of the 
Government, and have held up and painted in strong 
colors the actual situation in the islands; have pointed out 
the fallacy of imperial policy, and in high and truthful lights 
demonstrated that the very principles on which the union 
of the States and the grandeur of the nation rest, have 
been brutally and unblushingly violated. The attention of 
the postal authorities has been called to one of these arti- 
cles, and Postmaster Montague, with a degree of zeal 
which does small credit to his good sense, has proclaimed 
himself as willing to take the responsibility of excluding 
the publication from the mails as being treasonable. No 
doubt the postmaster feels that he has a precedent in the 
action of the Government in the case of Atkinson. But 
this postmaster forgets that at all times it is the personal 
privilege of any man to freely express his mind by speech 
or in writing. It is a right guaranteed to the humblest 
as well as the proudest citizen. Mr. Montague miscon- 
ceives the duties of bis position, and the News Letter 
advises him to read the Declaration of Independence and 
the Constitution of his country. 

The liberty of the press will be maintained, but not 
abused, by the News Letter; and we have no doubt Mr. 
Valentine will continue to express his convictions as suits 
him best and as is the privilege of an American. 

The First Whatever honest difference of opinion may 
Boys Home, exist as to the right and wrong of the war 
in the Philippine Islands and the policy of 
this country from a political, commercial and moral view 
point, all people, irrespective of party or creed, unite in 
extending a hearty welcome to the citizen soldiers, who, 
responding to the call of the President, followed the flag 
to the "front," and are now returning home. It cannot 
be a matter of consequence as between the soldiers' duty, 
promptly and bravely performed, and the policy which 
now holds him in the ranks. His heroism, his ready obedi- 



ence and his superb courage must excite the admiration 
and arouse the enthusiasm of every lover of the country and 
the country's colors. In the war in the Philippine Islands, 
the volunteers from the Pacific Coast States have shown 
of what metal they are made. They have suffered per- 
sonal loss and have faced death aud disease without flinch- 
ing. On the battlefield they have maintained the name 
earned by the men who wore the blue and the gray more 
than a third of a century ago, of being the greatest 
fighters 00 earth. Strangers to fear, their records for 
courage place them in the very van of the military pro- 
cession which was unfortunately called into existence by a 
misconception of a nation's duty, or the political necessi- 
ties of a great national party. 

The Oregon Volunteers are the first to return home. 
San Francisco hastens to give tbem hearty welcome. 
When they reach their own State they will be received 
with an enthusiastic demonstration which will make them 
feel that their sacrifices are understood and appreciated 
at their full worth. 

The Right Thing The right thing to do with Samoa is to 
to do treat its generous people with that 

fop Samoa. kindness which they have always 
shown themselves so ready to recip- 
rocate. When General Grant was induced to send down 
the Narragansett, in charge of Commander Meade, to 
treat for the cession of Pago Pago harbor, he was wisely 
advised to forward to the chiefs a number of inexpensive 
presents such as they would like. The most costly of 
these was a small steam launch, which the late King 
Malietoa kept in good order until the day of his death, and 
in which he was accustomed to pay periodical visits to his 
numerous possessions, as proud and even more self-con- 
tained than Emperor William of Germany himself. Tricked 
out in an Admiral's coat and hat and feathers, he looked 
and was every inch a King. As was expected, no trouble 
was found after that in acquiring the finest harbor and 
site for a coaling station to be found in the whole round of 
the Pacific. There was not recently, and never has been, 
any real necessity for fighting the Samoans. They can 
be approached in a better way. The only troubles are 
those which white officials incite. The Germans recently 
armed Tammassee's people, and the English and Ameri- 
cans armed those of Malietoa Luna. Both sides were 
angered into a warlike disposition by tales as vicious as 
they were false. Officials in tropical climates ought to be 
allowed to remain there only a very short time. The Eng- 
lish rule of moving such officers around at short intervals 
ought to be rigidly adhered to. Otherwise they will quar- 
rel, form revenges, and use the natives for all sorts of 
deviltry. It is useless to deny this, for it has been the 
rule in the tropical islands ever siqce white men got a 
footing there. The tripartite commission the other day 
found no difficulty in getting the natives to do as they 
wished. Arms and ammunition were surrendered with- 
out a whimper, the Kingship was abolished with mutual 
consent, and Tammassee and Malietoa embraced, feasted, 
and departed for their homes as good friends. One of the 
first things our people have got to do is to learn some- 
what of the different races we are seeking to rule. There 
are other ways of managing Filipinos, Samoans, and 
Hawaiians than by calling upon them to demonstrate 
their fighting abilities, which we have learned, to our 
cost, are considerable. 

Good to Flow From Mr. Crocker's offer to pay the vine- 
Mr. Crocker's Offer, growers of the State $14 per ton 
for their grapes for a period of 
seven years will be productive of good in more ways than 
one. It will, in the first place, give to the growers a cer- 
tainty of sale at a remunerative price. There will be no 
distant markets to seek, no risk of destruction on long 
hauls, and no danger of over-supplied and glutted markets. 
The producer will be paid the agreed price in cash on de- 
livery, and with that his risk and responsibility will end 
and Mr. Crocker's begin. The grapes will then have to 
be made into^wine and marketed. This is, by all odds, 
the most serious part of the business. It will require eter- 
nal vigilance, the employment of experts of undoubted 
skill, and the use of almost unlimited capital, and with all 
these combined, the risks are yet many and serious. Wine, 



July ts. 1899. 



• M-YV> i.l-TTKR 



in the course of its manufacture, has to go through many 
different processes, in any of which it is liable to spoil and 
become a total loss. One of the several reasons why the 
wine industry of California has not heretofore thriven as 
it ought to have done, is that individual growers have 
endeavored to manufacture their grapes into wine without 
possessing the requisite experience and skill. They have 
thrown all sorts of grapes into the same press, and have 
gathered their grapes all at the same time, without regard 
to their different degrees of ripeness. They have known 
little about blending, and nothing at all about catering to 
the public taste. A combination to relieve them of duties 
they are not qualified to fulfill is a step in the right direc- 
tion. A trust is not always a bad thing. When it resur- 
rects a dying business and causes it to thrive and grow 
exceedingly, it is unquestionably a good thing. If it opens 
up unlimited possibilities for California wines, as it is so 
well calculated to do, it will have rendered the State a 
service of incalculable value. 

The Educators It is a long way from our Eastern 
of the States to Los Angele3. Three thou- 

N»tion Among Us. sand miles or more of railroad trav- 
eling is a wearying, expensive jour- 
ney for thousands of men and women to take in the cause 
of common school education. There must be an uncommon 
determination and enthusiasm in the good teachers who 
undertook to accomplish it. It is profoundly regretted by 
all Californians that an accident should have been encoun- 
tered within the borders of their State. The collision of 
one of the many excursion trains with a freight train at 
Newman, which caused the death of two teachers and the 
injury of about a dozen others, is one of those deplorable 
accidents that will occasionally occur on the best regu- 
lated lines. Everything possible was done by the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad Company to ameliorate the condition 
of the sufferers, and to get those who had escaped 
promptly to their destination. Damages were assessed 
and paid on the spot with a liberality and an alacrity that 
merited and received the warmest approval of our visitors. 
Though this untoward event was sincerely lamented by all 
the teachers, most of whom had already reached Los An- 
geles, the Convention of the National Education Associa- 
tion proceeded to business. It was a grand gathering, 
brought together for a noble purpose. The various sec- 
tions have been in session during the week, and their pro- 
ceedings have been duly reported in the daily press. 
Teachers were present from all parts of the country and 
from all grades in its public schools. Now let our visitors 
spread themselves over the State, and let our people see 
well to it that they are made acquainted with a right 
royal California welcome. We never entertained guests 
more worthy of all that we can do for them than the 
teachers of the nation. 

Aro Wo To Have There Will be much talk as to the form 
A Colonial of governments to be provided for our 
Department? new colonies, until Congress meets and 
decides the question. Two suggestions 
have taken on such substantial shape as to be worth con- 
sideration. One emanates from Congressional leaders who 
think a new committee should be established to which all 
questions regarding the Government of Hawaii, the 
Philippines, Cuba, Porto Rico, etc., should be referred, 
and the other is that members of the Cabinet think that a 
new department should be created to have charge of 
"colonial" affairs and foreign commerce. There certainly 
cannot too soon be responsibility somewhere for the con- 
duct of affairs in our new possessions. The trouble at 
present >s that there is no common understanding, either 
in Washington, or in the islands, as to any certain line of 
policy or conduct. Matters are being permitted to drift, 
and no one seems to know when a halt will be cried, or 
what changes of winds and tides may not be encountered 
at any moment. A Congressional Committee will, under 
our system, be the first step in order. It ought to have 
been appointed at the last session, so that legislation might 
have been prepared for presentation to the next. Who the 
men are that should constitute a legislating initiative for our 
many new, strange, and distant possessions, does not yet 
clearly appear, and we very much fear that a drag-net 
would fail to bring many congressmen to light fitted for 



the work. The truth is we have no experience in imperial 
rule, and will have to learn the a new and 

wide departure for which we are very illy equipped at pre- 
sent. No doubt we can learn. What other Nations have 
accomplished wo can Imitate. Bu1 time will be needed in 
order to acquire the necessary training, pattern 
control. No doubt if we could lay our bands on the right 
man, a Cabinet Minister, in other words: — " a Colonial 
Secretary," would be a very desirable official to have. 
England has put her best men into a like position. 
Palmerston, Bulwer-Lytton, Gladstone and Joseph Cham- 
berlain, have been among the many great men who have 
at one time or another been "Colonial Secretaries," and 
great as they were, not all of them were successes. 
Gladstone and Palmerston, strange to say, were signal 
failures in the colonial office. The ocean cables have done 
wonders for their successors. Whatever we intend to do 
in our islands should be done quickly. It is due to our in- 
ternational obligations that we should set things straight 
without delay. We have been in the Philippines for over 
a year, during all of which time our treaty promises to 
foreigners have been in abeyance. 

The Company Of The voice of an outraged community 

Twinkling Stars, has thundered its protest against that 
moral abomination known as Hotel 
Nymphia. The existence of this sink of iniquity anywhere 
would be a stench in the nostrils of decency, but the fact 
that, after the exposure of its horrible object, it is per- 
mitted by the authorities to flourish in the very heart of a 
district of homes and families and churches, is both 
scandalous and criminal. 

This house of evil banishes purity of thought from the 
mind of youth made familiar with the daily parade of 
female depravity. It strikes at all that is virtuous and 
noble, and fosters all that is vicious and demoralizing. 
Clergymen of every faith have cried out against this 
breeding-den of vice; mass-meetings of citizens have con- 
demned it in unmeasured terms, and petitions have gone 
up to the authorities for its suppression. 

And what is Hotel Nymphia? Not a caravansary, but 
a place of nameless infamy, conducted by characterless 
men and women worse than weak; and these, in order to 
cloak their identity and if possible override the law, have 
gone so far as to incorporate under the name of the Twink- 
ling Star Company. To be plain, the nymph of the pave- 
ment has become the nymph of this Hotel. 

It behooves the officers of the law to bend their efforts 
to the duty of extinguishing these Twinkling Stars without 
delay. They are a flagrant public nuisance; a menace to 
peace and order, and an enemy to the laws of health. Let 
the past be removed, and the building disinfected. Let 
the Twinkling Star Company twinkle, 2 it will, behind the 
bars of the city jail. 

The Nlokel-ln-the-Siot Police Judge Treadwell has just 
Machines To Go. laid down the law touching the 
gambling devices, known as 
nickel-in-the-slot machines, in a manner so clear and con- 
vincing as to leave not a shadow of a doubt that the law is 
being violated, and that the duty of the police and of the 
judges, is plain beyond the possibility of a mistake. Just 
why there should ever have been any contention contrary 
to Judge Treadwell's present opinion, passeth all under- 
standing. The law is exceptionally clear. No man with 
a head upon his shoulders, be he Judge or only a police- 
man, could have honestly mistaken its terms. Some 
months ago these machines were raided and taken in for a 
time, but soon the word went out that they were to be 
tolerated again, and, as a consequence, they were never in 
more general use than they are to-day. What effect 
Judge Treadwell's intention to convict and fine every 
operator of a machine who may be brought before him, 
will have, it is hard to say. The chances are that his 
Court will not be burdened with that class of cases. The 
police will see to it that they go elsewhere. The thing to 
do is to see well to it that the law is the law in all the 
courts. If the machine owners are so powerful, and their 
customers so numerous, as to enable them to defy the law 
with impunity, let us understand the fact, and make up 
our minds that ours is "a wide open city," in which it is 
impossible to save the young from the manifold tempta- 
tions and evils of gambling. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 15, 1899. 



The Charter Judge Seawell's prompt decision in favor 
Sufviving of the constitutionality of the New Char- 

Legal Attacks, ter will bring that instrument at an 
ear'y date before the Supreme Court, 
where its fate will be finally determined. The men who 
are fighting in the Courts pretend to be cock sure that it 
will be knocked out with certainty and despatch. They 
may kDOW a thing or two about the members of the high- 
est appellate court, but we are very sure they do not 
know enough to justify their claim that the whole matter 
is a foregone conclusion. They do the judiciary a gross 
injustice by such pretenses, and deserve a rebuke that 
will keep them from erring in like manner again. The ob- 
jections that have been raised against the legality of the 
Charter are of a most technical, not to say flimsy charac- 
ter, and justify no member of the legal profession in claim- 
ing in advance that the Court's decision is a foregone con- 
clusion, and that it will be adverse to the Charter. Such 
a result would be so grave a public calamity that we are 
very sure their Honors the Judges will require something 
more than the hair-splitting of pettifoggers before they 
consent to bring it about. It is not easy to find unconsti- 
tutionality in a Charter voted upon and ratified by the 
people. It is not for creatures of the sovereign to over- 
ride the sovereign's will. The people of the State of Cali- 
fornia delegated to this municipality the right of home- 
rule under a charter of their own making, subject to the 
same being approved by the Legislature. All the prelim- 
inaries have been regular and in order. Fifteen freeholders 
were elected as provided for by law to formulate a charter. 
Within the statutory period they accomplished their task, 
which was then approved by the people and by the Leg- 
islature. It is nowhere provided in the State Constitution 
that a city charter shall secure the approval of the Su- 
preme Court. That Court is the creature of written laws 
enacted by the people, who are sovereign over all. It will 
no doubt occur to the creatures that it will not do to lay 
ruthless hands upon the work of the creator. Reprisals 
might be in order, and the sovereign power brought to 
bear upon those who may endeavor to thwart its will. The 
New Charter, backed as it is by the people, will overcome 
all obstacles, go into successful operation, and those who 
may endeavor to obstruct its way will, like the Govern- 
ment of Spain, "submit to a superior force." 

The Automobile. There can be no doubt that the equine 
is to give way to the automobile; that 
the horse is to disappear and that compressed air and 
electricity are to accomplish the work hitherto and at 
present performed by him. The automobile is coming to 
San Francisco very soon. Within the next year the 
machine will be a familiar sight on the streets and about 
the country. Rules of the road, regulations for the in- 
spection of the horseless carriage, laws governing the op- 
erations of the automobiles, and penalties for accidents 
and careless or incompetent driving will spread new ordi- 
nances on the city's statutes, and develop new laws. 

In France, where the automobile is most generally in 
use, the following regulations are in force : The operating 
mechanism, steering gear and brakes have to be duly ap- 
proved by an inspection board, and no one can drive an 
automobile who is not the holder of a certificate ol capac- 
ity from the prefect of the department in which he resides. 
The driver must always have the speed regulator well in 
hand. In case of narrow or crowded thoroughfares the 
speed must be reduced to a walking pace. In no case 
must it exceed eighteen and one half miles in the open 
country or twelve and one-half miles an hour while pass- 
ing houses. A special permit is required for racing. The 
approach of the vehicle must be signaled by means of a 
horn. Each automobile must be provided with two side 
lights — one white and the oiher green. 

a Pacific Coast Man Strange as it may seem, it begins 
For Vice-President to look as if California may name 
the next Vice-President of the 
United States if she will only bury her petty local quar- 
rels and fix upon a man capable of filling the bill. The 
politicians on the other side of the Rockies have about 
concluded that McKinley and Bryan are to be pitted 
against each other again, and the only remaining question 
seems to be as to who they are to have for running mates. 



Mr. Bryan has struck out boldly for William Allen Thur- 
man of Ohio, and the blow is causing quite an upset in pol- 
itical calculations. Mr. Hobart was slated for renomina- 
tion, but now the leaders of his party have the question 
up for reconsideration. Mr. Bryan holds that the old 
Eastern States will vote in a certain way, no matter who 
is nominated. The fighting ground be believes to be in 
the Middle West and Pacific Coast. Hence his disregard 
of the traditional policy of taking one of the candidates 
from the East when the other is from the West. His move 
has more in it than appears at first sight. The politics 
of Ohio are not in a happy condition. The load involved in 
carrying Mark Hanna is full of mischievous possibilities. 
Senator Foraker will have none of him, and the Senior Sen- 
ator is the greater power in the politics of the State. 
Then the anti-expansion policy has many enemies in Ohio, 
and the distribution of Federal patronage has not pleased 
the President's neighbors. To encounter these weaknesses 
by the candidature of a strong, clean popular man, such 
as Thurman is, is well calculated to give the slate-makers 
pause. Again, Mr. Hobart lives in New Jersey, and that 
is the State in which they incorporate and nurse trusts. 
Besides, Hobart is himself mixed up in a lot of trusts. He 
is out of the question, considering the issues to be raised. 
What is the alternative ? The West has its eye on the 
place. Ohio is now far East. "McKinley and afar West- 
erner" has suddenly become the cry of Republican Con- 
gressmen. The Pacific Coast seconds the motion and sug- 
gests that California is about as far West as the politicians 
can go for the present. 

Getting Ready It is exceedingly fitting that the work of 
for Dewey. duly receiving our national hero should 
have fallen to the lot of New York. It 
was in keeping with the eternal fitness of things that the 
Empire City should be given the honor of welcoming home 
the man who has done so much to found a new and more 
extended empire. In taking the matter in hand, New 
York represents not herself alone but the whole country. 
She has the population and the means to dignify the occa- 
sion as no other seaport in the country could hope to do, 
and right well is she applying herself to the multifarious 
obligations which the occasion imposes upon her. The city 
government has contributed $100,000 towards the ex- 
penses, and the total expended is expected to reach thrice 
that sum. Everything is to be done upon a large scale. 
New features are to be introduced that will exceed any- 
thing heretofore witnessed in this country. It is now in- 
tended that the ceremonies shall last two days. The naval 
and military displays will be worthy of the times and the 
place. Such an enthusiastic crowd as will turn out has 
never heretofore been witnessed on American soil. From 
all parts of our grand heritage representative people will 
go, and no doubt California will supply her share. It will 
be well worth while to time Eastern visits in such a way 
as to permit of the Dewey reception being witnessed. No 
such sight will come our way this century. When it is all 
over, it will be interesting to know what we are going to 
do with our grand hero, and what he proposes to do with 
himself. That some of us will want to make him President 
goes without saying. But he has himself put the quietus 
on any such purpose. He has no taste and no ability, he 
says, for the place. He will probably settle down to a com- 
paratively quiet life, and content himself with represent- 
ing the navy on all ceremonial occasions. 



1 The Frenchman likes his native wine, 
The German likes his beer, 
The Irishman likes bis whiskey straight 
Because it gives good cheer; 
The Englishman likes bis 'alf and 'alf 
Because it makes him frisky; 
But they all go back on their favorite drink 
For Jesse Moore "AA" Whiskey." 



PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A Sovereign Remedy. One dose will stop a cough. It never fails. 
Try it. Price, 25 cents. George Dahlbender & Co., 214 Kearny 
street. For sale by all druggists. 



No man glories in the fact that he is bald ; take warning in time if 
your scalp itches, it is just a reminder that you will sooner or later 
become bald. Use Smith's Dandruff Pomade, the only positive cure 
for itching scalp. 



July 15. 1899. 



SAN FRANC! \\S LETTER. 



AID ANO COMFORT TO THE ENEMY. 

ED1TOB The following from The 

Nation, published In New York, presents facts gen- 
erally known to anti-expansionists, but imperiali- 
rarely seek for such information that I believe you will be 
doing a public service to reprint the article : 

The speech made by Mr. Barrett, late Minister from the 
United States to Siaro, at the Chamber of Commerce In 
Boston, was in some respects commendable. So far as it 
dealt with the commerce of the East, it was at least more 
moderate in its estimates than some others that have been 
made. Mr. Barrett, however, assigned no substantial 
reason for the great increase of trade which be expected, 
and his estimates must be regarded as largely conjectural. 
1 1 is not his figures that appear to us deserving of atten- 
tion, but the political principles that he enunciates. He 
thinks that the only hope of this country, so far as gaining 
the trade of the Far East is concerned, is it our main- 
taining our sovereignty perpetually over the Philippine 
Islands, and he implies that those who protest against 
our subjugating their inhabitants are traitors. He de- 
clared that all our generals and most of our privates agree 
that the anti-imperialist movement has given unlimited aid, 
comfort, and encouragement to the forces of the Filipinos. 
More specifically, he stated that "the most encouraging 
influence for the Filipinos in fighting us, and hence the 
most unfortunate one for our soldiers and sailors to com- 
bat against, was the spreading of the sentiment and ideas 
through the ranks of the Filipino army and among the 
masses of the natives that our occupation of the islands 
was unwarranted, the war unprovoked, our army and 
navy unsupported by our people, and our country about to 
demand the withdrawal of our forces from the islands, the 
hauling down of the flag, and our complete and ignomin- 
ious withdrawal from our responsibilities." 

Mr. Barrett further declared that Senator Hoar's 
speech roused great hopes of freedom among the Filipinos 
and that he did all that he could to prevent copies of the 
speech from being distributed among them. This is in ac- 
cordance with the principles of the censorship which has 
been established under our military rule, and Mr. Bar- 
rett's whole speech is based on the assumption that it is 
. the duty of Americans who believe that we are engaged 
in a war of "criminal aggression" to deny their belief, or 
at least hold their tongues. This assumption has no place 
in the theory of free government. It belongs to despotism, 
and the naivete with which Mr. Barrett adopts it shows 
how extensive is the demoralization produced by war. 
«« But how consistent is his own practice with his censure 
of those who will not be silent at this time? We find in 
the July number of the Review of Reviews an article from 
his pen on the Philippine situation, in which he represents 
Aguinaldo as the idolized popular leader, who had returned 
to his country "under the protection of the ships of a na- 
tion called America, which had gone to war with Spain 
ana would give them freedom and independence at once." 
The "impression went abroad among the masses of the 
people that Aguinaldo had arrived to establish an inde- 
pendent Government, and that the Americans would assist 
him." The people flocked to him in such numbers that 
he had contributions of large sums of money, unlimited 
supplies of food, and more soldiers than he could arm. 
The "people were educated to believe that they were to 
have absolute independence." Within a few months, 
Aguinaldo organized a Government which "developed into 
a much more elaborate affair than its most ardent sup- 
porters had originally expected." By the middle of Octo- 
ber, 1898, says Mr. Barrett, 

" He had assembled at Malolos a congress of 100 men who would 
compare in behavior, manner, dress, and education with the average 
men of the better classes of other Asiatic nations, possibly including 
the Japanese. These men, whose sessions I repeatedly attended, 
conducted themselves with great decorum, and showed a knowledge 
of debate and parliamentary law that would not compare unfavor- 
ably with the Japanese Parliament. The executive portion of the 
Government was made up of a ministry of bright men who seemed 
to understand their respective positions. Each general division was 
subdivided with reference to practical work. There was a large 
force of nnder-secretaries and clerks, who appeared to be kept very 
busy with routine labor." 
Does that sound like the description of an assemblage 



of savages, or of an assemblage of intelligent men, who 
knew what they W«i m their rights, and won' 

bound to maintain them? And now read what Mr. Harrett 
says of the army which Aguinaldo collected : 

•■ The nrrni Aguinaldo was the marvel of hi* achieve- 

ments. He had over twenty regiments of comparatively well-organ 
i.ted. well-drilled and wtll-drwsed aoldtan, carrying modem rlflea 
and ammunition. I saw many <>f these regiment* executing m>l ottlj 
regimental bnl battalion ami company drill, with a precision that 
astonished tne. Certainly n* far as dress was coneomed. the com- 
parison with the uniform of our soldier* was favorable to the Filip- 
inos. They were officered largely, except in the higher positions. 
with young men who were ambitious to win honors and were not 
merely show lighters, li 1 all the different towns took 

great pride in this army. Nearly every family had a father, son or 
cousin in it. Wherever they went they roused enthusiasm (or the 
Filipino cause. The impression made upon the inhabitants of the 
interior by encta displays can be readily appreciated. Aguinaldo and 
his principal lieutenants also made frequent visits to the principal 
towns, and were received with the same earnestness that we show 
in greeting a successful President." 

We submit that when Mr. Barrett publishes facts like 
these, be does more to discredit the war which we are 
carrying forward in the Philippines than all the utterances 
of the anti-imperialists, and all the soldiers' letters com- 
bined, can do. He makes an effort to show that Aguinaldo 
is culpable because, when he found that the Americans 
were not going to withdraw and leave the Filipinos to rule 
their own country, he concealed the fact from his follow- 
ers. He also endeavors to show that while our forces 
maintained "most agreeable relations" with Aguinaldo 
when he first returned, Admiral Dewey was "careful to 
avoid formal recognition." But Mr. Barrett knows very 
well that there is other evidence on this point which estab- 
lishes beyond dispute that Aguinaldo and his followers 
were led to believe that they would be helped by the 
Americans to establish their own independence. There is 
the official dispatch of Admiral Dewey himself, sent to the 
Secretary of the Navy on June 27, 1898: 

"Aguinaldo, insurgent leader, with thirteen of his staff, arrived 
May 19th, by permission, on the Nashan ... 1 have given him to 
understand that I consider insurgents as friends, being opposed to 
a common enemy. He has gone to attend a meeting of insurgent 
leaders for the purpose of forming civil government. ... In my 
opinion, these people are far superior in their intelligence and more 
capable of self-government than the natives of Cuba, and I am famil- 
iar with both races." 

A few week later, General Thomas M. Anderson, com- 
manding the United States troops at Cavite. wrote to 
Aguinaldo: "I would like to have your Excellency's advice 
and co-operation, as you are best acquainted with the re- 
sources of the country." Three weeks later, still in 
supreme command, he asked Aguinaldo for assistance in 
transportation of American troops, "as it is to fight in 
the cause of your people." That previous to this time 
our consular officials, Wildman, Consul-General at Hong- 
Kong; Pratt, Consul-General at Singapore; and Williams, 
Consul at Manila, gave Aguinaldo the strongest reasons 
for believing that the American Government would help 
him to secure the independence of the Filipinos, is an estab- 
lished fact, the details of which are too familiar to need 
repetition. But what matters it how he and his fellow- 
patriots got the idea that we were to help them to fight 
for their independence? If they are fighting for it, what 
kind of an American is he who cannot sympathize with 
them? And if our sympathy depends upon their condition 
of savagery or the reverse, is not Mr. Barrett fostering 
the very "treason" he deprecates? 

John J. Valentine. 

San Francisco, July 10, 1899. 



That Little Book 
" Babies," issued by Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New York, 
should be in the hands of all young mothers. The hints it contains 
are invaluable to the inexperienced. Sent f.ee upon application. 

The invigorating qualities of some liquors greatly exceed the value 
of others in this respect. Take for instance J . F. Cutter and Argon- 
aut whiskies : They are of the finest quality and of most agreeable 
flavor. They are strengthening, mellow and pure. E. Martin &'Co. 
411 Market street, are sole agents for the United States. 

After the earouse drink Jackson's Napa Soda— then you oan go home 
with safety. Catch the idea? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1899. 




1 We obey no wana but Pleasure's."— Torn Moore. 



" T ORD and Lady Algy " at the Columbia is 
J_/ pose-play." Ostensibly it is 



a pur- 
a comedy, practi- 
cally it is a drama full of pathos. It has depth. It dis- 
cusses one aspect of married life. Incidentally it questions 
the morals of a member of Parliament. There are a few 
other details which are of interest. The underlying prin- 
ciple of the play is, that sensible people should always 
settle their marital difficulties quietly, and not make 
a show of themselves before a court of justice and the 
world at large. When love is either dead or diverted, 
it is best to let each party go their respective ways. 
Enforced union is equivalent to legalized crime; love 
diverted may return if permitted its own way. Lord 
and Lady Algy may disagree, but their perfect freedom 
of action, their misunderstood but sterling characters are 
bound to assert themselves, and mutual harmony is the 
ultimate result. On the other hand we find a woman 
scheming to extricate herself from the bonds of enforced 
union with a man who treats her brutally. This is the 
idea of the play. The plot is of course merely illustrative 
of the idea, and enters upon details which are neither vul- 
gar nor immoral; they are pure and excellent sketches of 
human nature, and presented with rare skill by rare artists. 
Let us then look for a moment at the motif of the play. 
Only stupidity can assert that the separation of Lord and 
Lady Algernon (Algy) is due to a difference in taste in cigar- 
ettes. It is deeper. It is the desire of a man to force his wife 
to his own way of thinking. She, being a spirited woman, 
resents the attempt, and grasps at a trivial matter to as- 
sert her independence. The result is that they agree to 
disagree. Lord Algy feels the blow to his married life 
keenly, but, being a gentleman, he bears his misfortune 
silently. That he plunges into ruinous betting on races is 
additional evidence that he is not indifferent to his trouble. 
Lady Algy, too, is not a bad sort. She does nothing im- 
moral or vulgar. She plays the races, like most women of 
her class, lives in separate apartments, and is anxious to 
show her husband that the days of marital tyranny are 
passed. She frequently comes to see her husband, and 
they meet on an equal footing. That Lord Algy is a moral 
man, sadly misunderstood by his own father, the Duke, 
(and by the illustrious critics of the daily press), is attested 
by his aversion to countenance an elopement of his 
brother, the Marquis of Quarmby, with the wife of a chol- 
eric friend. This brother, who is an M. P., and has the 
reputation of being a good Christian man, does not hesi- 
tate to steal the wife of another, and being, in reality, a 
moral idiot, thinks his brother's house just the place for 
the illicit rendezvous. Not for a moment does he reflect 
that Lord Algy may be better than his reputation. But 
Lord Algy has neither head nor heart in his brother's love 
affair. He does cot even know the woman whom his 
brother has seduced from the path of duty. In order that 
Algy may admit her when she comes, his brother gives 
him her photograph, which, after the other has gone, 
Lord Algy throws carelessly on the table. A moment 
later the woman's husband calls on Algy, to invite him to 
his wife's costume ball and incidentally to tell Algy his do- 
mestic troubles. Algy accepts the invitation, and prom- 
ises to straighten out matters; but, being called out of 
Ithe room for a moment, the jealous Tudway suddenly dis- 
fcovers his wife's picture on the table. The introduction 
[of this incident leads to a touching climax in the second 
■act. Lord Algy then goes in the dress of the Duke of 
iMarlborough to have, as he says, "a quiet chat with 
|Mrs. Tudway. 1 ' On the way to the ball, Lord Algy 



"dines a bit," and is in a rather jolly mood. Mr. Tud- 
way, who dogs his steps, sees his worst suspicions verified 
at finding the rather wobbly Lord Algy in conversation 
with Mrs. Tudway. Algy is utterly flabbergasted at 
hearing himself called a seducer and what not, when as a 
matter of fact he had but just that moment been told by 
Mrs. Tudway of her own identity. Of all the acquaint- 
ances of Lord Algy, including his brother, not one stirs to 
assist the almost helpless Algy when the irate Tudway 
orders him out of the house. Lady Algy, who is also a 
guest, just then comes into the hall, and, hearing Algy 
ordered out, runs up to him, and, with a sob in her voice, 
leads him from the room. 

* * # 

In the third act the choleric Tudway rings the bell of 
Lord Algy's house, just when the latter is lecturing Mrs. 
Tudway to return to her husband, she having come in obe- 
dience to an appointment with Quarmby, with whom she 
is to elope. Lord Algy talks to Mrs. Tudway in the same 
matter-of-fact manner as Sir Christopher talked to Lady 
Jessica in The Liars. The talk is more brusque and to the 
point, but then Mrs. Tudway is not the intellectual woman 
that Lady Jessica is. So while the important Swepson, 
Algy's valet, shows Tudway into the room, the Lady dis- 
appears in another room. The last scenes are a set of 
powerful denouements. The advent of Algy's father, who 
comes to reprimand his supposedly wayward son; Quarm- 
by, who comes to fetch Mrs. Tudway, and the appear- 
ance of Lady Algy, who comes "just to see Algy," are so 
many artistic effects. Of course Mr. Tudway insists upon 
seeing his wife. He has tracked her to Lord Algy's 
house. But to let him see her would compromise all. The 
case is presented to the old Duke and to the very honora- 
ble Marquis Quarmby — and there is the humor of the situa- 
tion — for while Tudway has wrathfully jumped on the 
Duke's hat, and has called Algy a seducer, Algy calls upon 
Quarmby to testify that he (Algy) never made love to 
Mrs. Tudway, and never knew her until the night before. 
A beautiful bit of play is done by Guy Standing as the 
hypocritical Quarmby, who avers with mental reserva- 
tions and plays with facts as a kitten with a sunbeam. 
But the difficulty is far from being settled when Lady 
Algy, who knows of the attempted elopement and rendez- 
vous, steps into the room and announces that she has an 
appointment with Mrs. Tudway. Explanations and apol- 
ogies follow, and Quarmby, smiling rather sickly, leaves 
with his father. Mr. Tudway takes away his wife, but 
Lady Algy remains. She deftly touches upon Lord Algy's 
finances, and finds that he is insolvent, having ruined him- 
self in the last race, while she had won niDe thousand 
pounds, and which, together with herself, she offers to him. 
So, after all, she had never ceased to love him. All she 
wanted was to make him dependent upon her companion- 
ship. She wanted him to know that she was his equal; 
but when the moment came and she saw that he needed a 
woman's tender care, she gave herself to him uncondi- 
tionally; she was even willing to smoke Egyptian cigar- 
ettes. 

* # # 

This is the play, motif, and moral. As for the acting, I 
cannot say enough about that. There is such a lot of de- 
tail — so fine and so marvellously carried out that it would 
take all the space at my command to write just about 
that alone. I am not at all surprised that Henry Miller 
is worn out with the work of the rehearsals. There is a 
killing amount of small talk in the play. Nor do I wonder 
that Margaret Anglin fainted three times on Monday 
night. Added to the hard rehearsal work came a severe 
cold, which made her quite ill. As for the suggestion that 
any other lady of the company should have taken Miss 
Anglin's part, it must be stated with as much emphasis 
as possible that there is no other lady in that company 
who could have done justice to any of the parts thus far 
presented by Margaret Anglin. Take, for instance, Miss 
Blanche Burton, who is a beautiful woman, but beauty is 
not genius, and Margaret Anglin is a genius. One must 
not listen so much to what she says as to how she says it. 
I predict that, erelong, Margaret Anglin will be acknowl- 
edged one of the greatest living actresses. 

Of Henry Miller's part it is needless to speak at length. 
He is young, but he is already a past master in the art. 



July 15, 1890. 



SAN FRANCISCO Xl-WS I I Til K 



He knows. Mr. Walcot is a distinguished actor, and one 
cannot imagine a finer Duke than he ma. ill the 

■men of this remarkable company 
their particular parts. James Lindsay makes a capital 
London chappy. No one in that company and few in any 
other, could play Quarmby. the r tod by Guy 

Standing. He has just the build, stolidity, and tone of 
voice to get into the skio of an English Lord, and be 
tainly played his part with a naturalness that was refresh- 
ing. The longer one sees these artists the fonder he 
grows of them and their splendid abilities. Lord and Lady 
Algy can be seen to better advantage after the second or 
third time. As I said before, the play is a study, and is 
worth the earnest consideration of every thoughtful audi- 
tor. 

* » » 

After all, Italian operas are best in the Italian language; 
the vocalization of speech and music are in perfect har- 
mony. But there are some exceptions. What is oft- 
times rough sounding in speech may be atoned for by 
clever and graceful acting and musicianly vocalization. I 
found this exception last Monday night at Morosco's Grand 
Opera House in Carmen. Thomas H. Persse proved h>s 
power in his part; he came very near being an ideal Don 
Jose; his work was hard, but it was well done. Edith 
Mason's appearance reminded me of Gadski in the same 
part. But while Miss Mason did not top it like the match- 
less German singer, she nevertheless sang with great 
sweetness, delicacy and evident understanding of her role. 
Goff, though he himself has some objections to his height 
for Escamillo, was a surprise to me. The music is a trifle 
too low for him, but he is an artist; he is thoroughly at 
home in his part, and I will acknowledge that I never 
thought of comparing Goff with any one. I certainly 
would not compare him with the utterly worn-out Ben- 
saude, of the E'lis Opera Company. Goff s voice is fresh 
and strong; he is also imbued with sufficient animal force 
to put passion into his play, and the Torreador song was 
so very good that I was glad he had to sing it again. Mr. 
Wit, or Witte, who played the Sergeant, was really good 
in appearance. But if he was a Witte, as an actor he cer- 
tainly was a joke as a singer. 

As Carmen, HattieBell Ladd's manners are just a little 
bit American in this part, she is reluctantly immod- 
est. Now, really, there is nothing wrong in showing 
your really beautiful shoulder or your well-formed arm; 
for the play demands that exposition. Your dancing, too, 
is just a little too churchy. I would have you raise that 
abbreviated skirt a little higher and move your little feet 
a little quicker. A spring or two would not hurt either. 
Wait and (if you ever do) see Calve, then you will wish you 
had put more intoxication into your Carmen. For that is 
precisely what Carmen wants — intoxication or abandon. 
The limbs must be limber and must follow with quick pre- 
cision the sung or spoken word. I am glad to have seen 
Hattie Bell Ladd in Carmen. She has revealed her artistic 
power. Adolphe Danziqek. 



After an absence of more than a year Blanche Bates 
and T. Daniel Frawley appeared at the California last 
Thursday evening. The theatre was filled with the friends 
of Miss Bates and Mr. Frawley, who were there to give 
them — and especially Blanche Bates — welcome. The Last 
Word, for the first time presented here, was the play, and 
as the leading character Miss Bates gave her old-time 
friends a genuine surprise. In the first place she is a 
handsomer woman to-day; more rounded and filled out; 
more sure of herself, more capable as an artist, more 
lovely as a woman. Study has done much for Blanche 
Bates, and as she stood before the footlights and prettily 
responded in a speech to the storm of welcoming 
applause San Franciscans realized and admired her genius 
more than ever before. The polish and certainty of her 
art throughout the scenes was pronounced and genuine. 
The company is a competent one, and the performance as 
a whole more than satisfactory; but the eyes and the 
hands of the large and fashionable audience were chiefly 
for the leading lady. The Dancing Girl, Sans Gene, and 
The Ruby, Miss Bates' greatest Eastern success, wiil be 
presented during this engagement. 

Following The Last Word at the California Theatre will 
come Tht Dancing Girl, Henry Jones' English society com- 



edy, which hat created guch a sensation throughout the 
East, from the opportunity it gives Blanche BatM to fall 
down an entire length of real stairs and not break her 

■■ hile playing the same 
part in the sani' .. stumbled or tobogganed down 

these stairs, but according lo the New York critics, Miss 
Bates is the only one who has, as yet, succeeded in actually 
tumbling down. She does not do it gracefully; she does 
not try to. She attempts to do it naturally, and she suc- 
ceeds so well that the audience involuntarily hold their 
breath, expecting to hear some one announce the drop of 
the curtain because of the injuries sustained by the lead- 
ing lady. 

Camille will be followed at the Alcazar by The New Mag- 
daltn. The story hinges upon the sigh for forgiveness of 
an erring woman. The scenes open on the battle-field 
during the Franco- Prussian war, at which time Mercy, a 
Red Cross nurse, forms the acquaintance of one Grace 
Roseberry, and from her learned the latter's story, and 
the fact that she had never been seen by her relatives, 
and that she was on her way to meet them. Mercy learns 
that Grace was killed, and prompted to regain her posi- 
tion in life, assumes the name of her newly-made friend, 
seeks the relatives, is accepted as Grace, and then falls 
in love with a man of wealth and position. During the action 
of the play, the real Grace appears upon the scene, and 
therein lies the many intrinsic qualities of merit for a strong 
emotional drama of profound interest. 

The Orpheum management will present four new attrac- 
tions next week, two of tbem recently imported from Eu- 
rope, and two of them well-known Orpheum favorites. 
Kilpatrick & Barber, trick bicycle riders, have just ar- 
rived from England, where they filled big houses with their 
daring and novel exhibition. For the first time patrons 
of the Orpheum will be given an opportunity to witness 
the novel act of Les Browns, the wonderful one-legged 
male and female acrobats and instrumentalists. The Pas- 
qualis have been re-engaged for one week, and Houdini, 
king of handcuffs, will re-appear. All the holdovers are 
excellent. 

Theatre patrons will be pleased to learn that Lord and 
Ladi/ Algy will be followed by that delightful play, Hearts- 
ease, than which there are few more beautiful productions 
on the stage. Mr. Miller's company will be able to pre- 
sent Heartsease with that fullness and attention to detail 
and temperament which has attended every play put on 
by Mr. Miller and his people. 

Bluebeard will be continued at the Tivoli until further 
notice. The comic opera season will be closed with Wang, 
and will be followed by the grand opera season, which 
promises to be of unusual splendor. 

At the Grand Opera House, on Monday evening, will be 
presented Audran's popular opera, Olivette, with a full 
cast of the company. 

A place of interest for visitors is the Gump Art Gallery of Paint- 
ings, by European masters. No. 113 Geary street. 

Baldwin s Dyspepsia Capsules give quick relief and permanent cure. 
Perry Dr"g Store. 8 Market street. 

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Telephone, Red S721 



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h 1 ^^^*m^*k*^^^*^&i*^^*^^^^^^^* J !*, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS BETTER 



July 15, 1899. 



THE FOLLY OF A YOUTH. 



MISS Maudie De Tour sat looking pensively into the 
glass of her dressing table. She saw that the once 
pretty face was telling the tales of the years; the crow's 
feet were marked under the eyes; the skin was haggard. 
Yes, she must certainly marry now and make sure of her 
future, for next birthday she would be thirty-four, and 
with every coming year her chances of making a good 
match would be lessened. 

Late hours, and the pursuit of pleasure through them, 
might have played havoc with her pretty face and figure, 
but she had taken care of her appearance, and she was 
still known as the beautiful Marie De Tour. She lived in a 
pretty little flat, and earned a small salary on the stage, 
and never wanted for money, yet she knew that purses 
that are open to youth and beauty are closed when age 
comes begging. Decidedly, she must marry — but whom? 
She still had a select circle of admirers, each of whom 
she played against the others; now she had only to openly 
prefer one, and to encourage him judiciously, and she was 
sure of winning him. This select circle consisted of meD 
who were still under the age of five-and-twenty; the 
middle-aged men she had known had left her for younger 
women; and, besides, middle-age is cautious, and a youth 
can always be enslaved by a fairly young and pretty 
woman. She was wise, then, in choosing youth for her 
companions, and she had never been a fool. 

She dressed, and sent a little note to Fred Douglas, 
begging him to come and see her. He was twenty-three, 
very well off, good looking, an athlete, an Oxford man, 
studying, or supposed to be studying for the bar, with the 
distinct understanding that be was never to practise, but 
to consider that his life's work was over as soon as he was 
called. This would gain him distinction, which would be 
sufficient to stamp him for life as a man of learning and 
ability; and his mother particularly desired him to be the 
most clever and learned, as he was the best looking, man 
in his set. 

He came round in the afternoon, and found Miss De Tour 
unduly grave. He greeted her with jokes, but she only 
smiled faintly, and then sighed. 

"What's the matter, Maudie?" he asked. 
" I am a little sad, old boy," she said. "Don't you ever 
feel sorrowful?" 

" Get a headache in the morning sometimes, and feel a 
bit savage," he said. 

"But not a feeling that life is serious and that you've 
thrown much of it away?" she asked him. 

"D d seriousl" he said. "I'm always trying to forget 

that." 

"Some day, dear, you may think, as I've been thinking 
lately, that pleasure is not solid satisfaction. Fred, I've 
been a silly little fool, and I heartily regret it." 

"You've been a dear little woman, always ready to 
cheer a fellow up." 

"You are so kind, dear; but you know how bad I've 
been. Do you believe that a woman may genuinely repeat 
and live a new life, a clean, good life that will make a man 
happy?" 

"I know you'd make any man happy," he said. 
She smiled, showing her even white teeth, the best that 
money could buy, and he thought her prettier than ever. 
" Thank you for that, dear. I believe I can. Anyhow 
I've found out what a mistake I've made, though I've not 
been really bad at heart, do you think so, Fred, dear?" 
and she looked at him tearfully. 

"Bad — no, a thousand times no. You're the sweetest 
little woman breathing," he said emphatically. 

"Dear old Fred," she said, taking his hand, and he 
lifted hers to his lips and kissed it, and then kissed it again 
and again until she drew it away. 

" That's your good-bye to it, Fred," she said. "I've — 
I've cared for you more than anyone else in the world, and 
so I sent for you to tell you the news first." 

"What news? You're not going to get married," he 
asked. 

She nodded, and then turned away and rubbed her eyes 
with a dainty lace handkerchief. 



"He has asked me so often, and I've refused. But now 
I see my duty, and I'm going to accept." 

" Who is he?" 

" No one you know, Fred dear; but he is a gentleman. I 
told him that I had been no better than — than a man, and 
he has consented to overlook the past," and she whispered 
the words and turned away as if to hide a look of shame. 

The youth rose from the sofa where he had been sitting 
beside her, and walked up and down the room several 
times, without speaking, she watching him from the cor- 
ner of her eyes, and sobbing in little musical gasps now 
and then. 

" Do you really love the fellow?" Douglas asked abruptly, 
as he came to a standstill in front of her. 

" I respect him," she said softly. 

"That's not love. You, of all women, won't be happy 
unless you marry for love. Now, Maudie dear, tell me 
frankly, do you care for him as much as you do for me?" 

She burst into a passion of tears, and he sitting again 
beside her tried to soothe her. 

" You have no right to ask me?" she sobbed. 

He put his arm round her waist, and kissed her unre- 
sisting mouth. 

"You haven't given him your answer, yet?" he said. 

She shook her head. 

"Then, darling, Maudie darling, take me instead, t 
may not be so rich." 

"I'm not mercenary," she interrupted. 

"I know that, dearest," he said; "but I've got a couple 
of thou' a year settled on me, so that my wife won't starve. 
Now will you have me?" 

" You won't think nasty things about me?" she asked. 

" We will both of us bury the past. Mine's no more to 
boast of than yours. I expect there'll be some silly talk 
about it at first, but we'll go abroad for a little, and then 
it will all be forgotten. Now, darling, will you have me?" 

"Yes, Fred, my boy, my own love," she whispered, 
caressing his still downy cheek; and there the two sat un- 
til the youngster had to go, vowing it was the happiest 
day of his life, and she, peeping after him through the 
blinds, did a little dance, expressive of her great satisfac- 
tion. 

" Well, he really is a nice boy, and I dare say I'll make 
him a good wife," she said to herself complacently, and 
sat down to write him a letter, with a view to obtaining 
some correspondence on the subject of marriage from him 
as soon as possible. 

And the youngster, feeling suddenly the gravity of man- 
hood thrust upon him, yet withal as happy as possible, 
drove off to see his uncle, Major Crewe. 

"Now I've something to tell you, uncle, that I can't tell 
anyone else. You're a man about town, and you'll under- 
stand. I'm engaged to be married." 

The Major whistled. 

" You're in a hurry, my boy," he said. 

"Had to be. Another fellow was waiting for his 
answer. Now I want you to square the mater. She's 
likely to cut up rusty, I know, although she needn't." 

" Is the lady unknown to her?" 

" Yes. She's an actress, and maters are always pre- 
judiced against actresses." 

"I know her, I suppose." 

' : You must have seen her at the Jollity — Miss De Tour. " 

The Major pursed his lips. 

" I knew her, my dear boy, before she was Miss De Tour. 
In fact, I've known her rather intimately." 

"She's a dear little soul, isn't she, uncle? She's been a 
bit flighty, so have I, and therefore we can't throw the 
past in each other's faces; and you as a man of the world 
know that most people have a past, if the world doesn't 
know it." 

" She's a good bit older than you, Fred." 

" She's twenty-eight, but she doesn't look it. Of course 
I didn't suppose you'd bless the union, but you've seen I've 
made up my mind, I want you to make the best of the 
affair to my mother." 

" Where does Miss De Tour live, Fred?" 

" You won't go there and worry her, if I give it to you?" 

"Worry her? Certainly not; we're old friends," said 
the Major. 

An hour afterwards Miss De Tour had a second caller, 
Major Crewe being announced. 



July 15, 1899. 



.-AN FRANCISCO NBWS UBTlfiK 



"'Pod my soul, .Maudie. " he said, "you don't look a day 
older than when I last saw you." 

" I'm not very old, yet," she said, prepared to Sighx. 
"only twenty-ei^ht. I was very younjj when I first met 
you.'' 

" And to think you are going to marry my nephew — 
well, well — I wish you all happiness." 

She looked keenly at him, but he was smiling, and so she 
felt more assured. 

" But what will his mother say?" he added pensively. 

" Fred is not dependent on his mother," she said. 

" No, but she has great influence over him. I should 
like to see him settled down, and to an old friend above 
all, but there will be strong opposition, I warn you." 

"We are prepared for that." 

"Fred isn't, my dear. He has asked me to break the 
news to his mother — a job I hate. Someone who knows 
her has bet ten to one Fred will back out." 

" He won't," she said. 

"As a matter of fact, I fear that he will, and sol 
thought I'd come and assure you that it will be through 
no fault of mine." 

"You are very kind," she said, and wondered whether 
he was a genuine friend, or not. 

"And so I demand an uncle's kiss," and he caught her 
and kissed her. "'Pon my soul, I wonder how I've kept 
away from you so long. There's no other girl half so 
sweet." 

"Ah! you were always a flatterer, Major." 

" No, indeed no. D'you know when that boy told me of 
his engagement I felt quite sick. I felt in that moment I'd 
give half my life to be in his place." 

"You'll never marry, Major." 

" I would have married you if you'd have taken me," he 
said, and held her to him. 

" Oh! well, it's too late now," she said moving away. 

"No, it isn't," he said, "now look here, dear. The boy 
is a good boy, but he doesn't know his own miDd. His 
mother will talk him out of the match, as sure as my 
name's Crewe. Why not take me? I'm better off, I've 
no one to consult, I'm a better age for you. Come now, 
the boy will be upset for a week no doubt, and dance at 
our wedding a fortnight later." 

It took an hour, but by the end of that time Miss De 
Tour had accepted the Major's offer of marriage, and she 
had given him a letter to take to Fred announcing the 
fact, and excusing herself. And armed with this the 
Major faced his fiery young nephew, and had the satisfac- 
tion of hearing Fred swear that all women were frauds, 
and uncles infernal blackguards, and that he'd go to 
Africa for a year's shooting, and forget that such things 
existed. 

So he was sent away, and until the Cape steamer had 
sailed the Major regularly waited upon Miss De Tour; but 
as soon as the steamer was down channel he announced to 
his friends that the engagement was off. 

Maudie was furious, and her solicitors commenced an 
action for breach of promise at once, but the Major told 
Mrs. Douglas: 

" Let the woman sue me; no jury will award her much 
in the way of damages under the circumstances. It won't 
hurt me, and Fred won't make an ass of himself again in a 
hurry. We must pay a ransom to redeem the folly of 
youth, eh?"— Pick-Me-Up. 



Champagne Imports in 1898 
Aggregated 242,319 cases, of which 86,855 eases were G. H. Mumm's 
Extra Dry, the acme of perfection. Bottles will bear green neck- 
band and star label. 

Insist Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 
Otber Eastern Cities read over the Nickel Plate (N. Y, 0. & St. 
L. R. R,.), the popular low-rate short line. Quick time, unexcelled 
accommodations, and no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adams, 
Pacific Coast Passenger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal, 

Do you know that Smith's Dandruff Pomade has cured thousands 
of cases of dandruff, itching scalp, eczema and falling hair when all 
other remedies have failed? Price 50c at all druggists. Sample Free. 
Address Smith Bros., Fresno, Cal. 

End up your spree and taper oil and sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



a\ Quick Response 10 The 

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KeiDingron 

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work - 
Cood Worts at that. 



WyckoiT, Seamans & Benedict, 211 vi jutg jmcry St., San Francisco 

POWFI I »07 deary St., S. F. 

Late with McNULTY. rlflC ^llOCS^ 

Made to Order. 



Betliesda 



For the Kidneys Bladder, Indigestion. 

L CAHEN & SON, Agents, 

418 Sacramento Street, S. F. 



KODAK *GENCY . . 

T. P ANDREWS, 

109 Montgomery Street - - - San Francisco. 



RE-LOADING, 
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PRINTING. 



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Principal office, 38 Powell St., opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

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And does' his best in all his days, 
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Do this and we will keep you clean, 
Rinse from your conscience all things mean, 
You surely want thus to be seen. 

ELECTRIC LAUNDRY CO., 835 FOLSOM St. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEk. 



July 15, 1899. 




Old Cambridge. The new series of National Studies in 
American Letters, edited by Professor 
George Edward Woodberry, has for its initial volume three 
more than pleasing; essays on Holmes, Longfellow, and 
Lowell, by Colonel Thomas Wentworth Higginson, grouped 
under the title, "Old Cambridge." Of the three authors 
most widely associated with Old Cambridge, only Holmes 
and Lowell were born there, although tn Longfellow, who 
was born in Maine, while that reeion was still a part of 
Massachusetts, its associations became a second nature. 
Holmes went to Europe for his medical training at the 
age of twenty-three, and never after lived in his native 
town, though always near it. Longfellow came to live in 
Cambridge in early middle life, while Lowell bad a passion- 
ate love for his birthplace, and died in the home where he 
was born. With many felicitous touches does Colonel Hig- 
ginson emphasize the individual literary characteristics of 
the three great authors he portrays — all literary types 
widely at variance. Colonel Higginson is himself an Old 
Cambridge man, and justly proud of the town which may 
be said to owe its very name and existence to the pursuit 
of letters. Laid out originally by Governor John Win- 
throp as a fortified town, it might have gone the way of 
many abortive early settlements had it not been for the 
establishment of Harvard College there. The Reverend 
Thomas Shepard, a graduate of Emanupl College, Cam- 
bridge, England, came to America in 1635. He was a 
voluminous writer, and so won the confidence of the leaders 
of the colony that when a college was to be founded, to it 
was given the name of the English university city, so that 
"the settlement first called 'Newetowne' became in May, 
1638, Cambridge, and has thus ever since remained." Of 
its traditions, its literary foundations, its historical church- 
yard—the latter described by both Holmes and Longfellow 
in their poems — its literary families — more, perhaps, than 
any other place in America has produced — its group of 
cultivated foreigners, its many historic associations, Col- 
onel Higginson writes no less agreeably than of its three 
eminent authors. These delightful essays on New Eng- 
land writers will be followed by a series of studies upon 
American literature, several volumes of which are nearly 
ready, viz.: "The American Historical Novel," by Paul 
Leicester Ford; "The Knickerbockers," by the Reverend 
Henry Van Dyke, D. D. ; "Southern Humorists," by John 
Kendrick Bangs; "Brook Farm," by Lindsay Swift, etc., 
etc. The object of this new series of National Studies in 
American Literature is, says Professor Woodberry, "to 
present the history and development of our literature 
during its first century in a form sufficiently various and 
many-sided to comprehend its many phases and their par- 
ticular relation to historical movements, social conditions, 
localities, differences of origin, temperament and environ- 
ment — to exhibit, in general, its whole breadth and cop- 
iousness, and to do this in such a way as to make the en- 
tire series a complete view valuable both for itself now and 
as a permanent record of the century." 

Old Cambridge : by Thomas Wentworth Higginson. TheMaomillan Com- 
pany, Publishers, New York. For sale by Elder & Shepard, 237 Post St. 

The Trail of the With the vast army of fiery-hearted 
Gold-Seekers. adventurers who, about a year ago, 
set their faces to the new Eldorado, 
the gold-fields which had come to be called "The Klon- 
dike," because of the extreme richness of a small river of 
that name which entered the Yukon well on toward the 
Arctic Circle, went Mr. Hamlin Garland. Leaving the 
■ Canadian-Pacific Railway at Ashcroft, he took the trail 
which makes its tortuous way northward between the 
great glacial coast range on the left and the spurs of the 
■Continental Divide on the East. For four months be lived 



among the miners and hunters, and was one of them. His 
experiences and impressions he has recorded in prose and 
verse in a volume ]ust issued, entitled, "The Trail of the 
Gold-Seekers." Mr. Garland was in nosense a gold-seeker 
himself, but believing this to be the last great march of 
the kind which would ever come in America, the wild 
places of which are being so rapidly settled up, he desired 
to take part in this great rush northward, to come face 
to face with the great free spaces of woods and skies and 
streams. A nature hunter, he was eager to enter this, 
the wildest region yet remaining in Northern America. 
Mr. Garland went no further than Glenora, at the head of 
navigation on the Stickeen River, for the coming of 
autumn, and the fact that there were a hundred and 
seventy miles of pack trail more before the headwaters of 
the Yukon could be reached, decided him to leave four 
horses and a thousand pounds of grub with his partner, 
who was a miner, and to make his way to Dyea and Shag- 
way. Of his tramp of thirty miles in eleven hours, from 
Lake Linderman to Dyea over the Chilcoot Pass, which 
he made with a tall, vigorous doctor from Winnipeg, who 
set for him a tremendous pace, breasting a continuous 
rain storm over a summit three thousand six hundred feet 
in height, he writes with much spirit. The walk was a 
grim experience over slippery ledges, along banks of an- 
cient snows, facing a roaring wind, with but a single inci- 
dent to lighten its gloom. Against this dismal background 
of mountains whose peaks are lost in cloud, he sketches, 
in a few swift strokes, with the same charm that distin- 
guished his "Main Traveled Roads," a portrait that is 
full of life. "The Girl of the Mist" is a pen picture that 
is worthy of a place on Memory's wall. It is done in these 
words: And here — just here, in a world of crags and 
mist — I heard a shout of laughter, and then, bursting upon 
my sight, strong-limbed, erect, and full-bosomed, appeared 
a girl. Her face was like a rain-wet rose — a splendid, 
unexpected flower set in this dim and gray and desolate 
place. Fearlessly she fronted me to ask the way, a laugh 
upon her lips, her big gray eyes confident of man's chiv- 
alry, modest and sincere. I had been so long among rude 
men and their coarse consorts that this fair woman lit the 
mist as if with sudden sunshine — just a moment and was 
gone. There were others with her, but they passed un- 
noticed. There in the gloom like a stately pink rose I met 
the Girl of the Mist." When outfitting at Ashcroft Mr. 
Garland purchased a dapple-gray gelding, and so faithful 
and intelligent was Ladrone that when his master returned 
to his home in Wisconsin he took the horse with him, there 
to live amid plenty for the rest of his days. The verse, 
which is scattered throughout the book, accentuates many 
of the pictures of the trail. The following lines will give 
some idea of its merit : 

"The Great Stickeen Divide." 
" A land of mountains based in hills of fir, 
Empty, lone, and cold. A land of streams 
Whose roaring voices drown the whirr 
Of aspen leaves, and fill the heart with dreams 
Of dearth and death. The peaks are stem and white 
The skies above are grim and gray 
And the rivers cleave their sounding way 
Through endless forests dark as night, 
Toward the ocean's far-offline ot spray." 
The Trail of the Gold-Seekers : by Hamlin Garland. The Maomlllan Com- 
pany, Publishers, New York and London. For sale at The Emporium. 
Price, $1.20. 

How to Cook In a recently-published little volume en- 
Husbands, titled "How to Cook Husbands," Mrs. 
Elizabeth Strong Worthington gives some 
recipes which will no doubt prove valuable to those desir- 
ing to perfect themselves in the various branches of mat- 
rimonial cookery. The primary requisite is, of course, to 
"first catch your fish," but it is far better to have none, 
unless you patiently learn to cook him, the author says, 
and to that end she offers numerous suggestions, some of 
which are as follows: "A preserving kettle of the finest 
porcelain is the best, but if you have nothing but an 
earthen pipkin, it will do, with care. See that the linen 
in which you wrap him is nicely washed and mended, with 
the required amount of buttons and strings nicely sewed 
on. Tie him in the kettle with a strong cord called Com- 
fort, as the one called Duty is apt to be weak. Make a 



July 15, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



log stead I of Lovp ., and 

with him. in the form of what con- 

fectioners call Kisses, but no vinegar or pepper on any 
account. A little spice improves lliem, but It must be 
used with judgment. ' The writer claims that it is tx 
so many husbands are served raw — fresh — uuprepared, 
that we hear of such numbers of cases of marital indhzi 
but adds that "properly treated they are really deli- 
cious." It is a k'ood cook that can make an appetizing 
dish out of poor material, and when a woman makes a de- 
licious husband out of little or nothing, she may rank as a 
But there is more to the book than its culinary title 
would suggest. There is a love story running through it, 
which ends as all such stories should— with the love still 
burning with a clear bright flame. Then there is an in- 
terpolated little tale called "Devotion," which records the 
attachment of a pair of fox-hounds, and still another tells 
of two horses, remarkable for the strength of their affec- 
tions for each other. That the author is as fond of nature 
as she is of animals is evidenced by many descriptive pas- 
sages, which dwell upon the beauties of sea and sky and 
shore. 

How to Cook Husbands: by Elizabeth Strong "Wortbiogton. The Dodge 
Publishing Company, Publishers. New York. For sale at the Emporium. 
Price, 80 cents. 

Kipling's Poems. No former publication of Mr. Kipling's 
poetic work contains so many titles as 
that just edited by Wallace Rice and published by the 
George M. Hill Company of Chicago. It contains all the 
verses by Mr. Rudyard Kipling originally printed in "De- 
partmental Ditties " and "Barrack-Room Ballads," and 
for the first time the verses from his prose works are 
brought together. All his early verses, many of them 
hitherto ignored as poems, are also included in the volume. 
Mr. Rice prefaces the book with a very interesting intro- 
ductory essay on this popular singer of songs and teller of 
stories, in which he says that: "If Great Britain and the 
United States are standing shoulder to shoulder in the 
van of human progress to-day or at any day in the future 
are so to stand, it is due not to an act of Parliament or of 
Congress, nor to a treaty between extraordinaries and 
plenipotentiaries, not to any other law written and sub- 
scribed by the two great cousinly powers, but to the bal- 
lads of one Rudyard Kipling, a mac born in India, educated 
in England, and married in A.merica." The book contains 
also some verses dedicated to Mr. Kipling during his late 
serious illness. It is fully annotated and indexed, and has 
a cover of crimson and gold. 

Kipling's Poems : George M. Hill Company, Publishers, Chicago. For 
sale at The Emporium. Price, 80 cents. 

M. E. B. 



ON Sunday, the 23rd inst., the Southern Pacific, under 
the personal conduct of Col. W. H. Menton, will run 
its great regular annual excursion to Santa Cruz, over the 
narrow gauge scenic route, through the famous Santa 
Clara Valley, and along the streams which thread the fine 
redwood forests of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Santa 
Cruz is at its best at this time. The extremely low price 
of $2.00 for the round trip has been fixed. Tickets will be 
on sale at the Grand Hotel ticket office on the 19th, 20th, 
21st, and 22nd, and at the depot on the morning of the 
23rd. The boat leaves this side at 7:45 a. m.; Oakland 
local train, 14th and Franklin street, at 7:45; and Park 
street, Alameda, at 8:20, returning to the city at 8:05 
p. m. 

IN his lifetime the late J. J. O'Brien built up for his mam- 
moth store in this city a reputation for fair dealing, 
reliability, and good values, which was recognized every- 
where. The re-organized company, which was formed 
after his death, is maintaining the reputation established 
by Mr. O'Brien in his life and dealings with the public. To 
get an article from O'Brien's is to feel certain that it is 
exactly as represented. The prices ruling at that im- 
mense establishment are always most reasonable, and the 
goods fresh and seasonable. 

At Cafe Zinkand the best supper is always served, and an excell- 
ent orchestra discourses the very latest and choicest selections. 
After the theatre the cafe is crowded with delighted people. 



rand Upera nouse. u»»«>.. r 

: monclDf Monday. July 17lb,m>ftninc«nl re\ lv»l ot Audru'n 
obarmlnjf opent, 

OLIVETTE. 

MatlnooStturdn. 

Mrancli Uckt 
^^^^^^ Insldeof main enti <>iiutn. 

T' ,„r A l— l Mrs. Ernest-ink Krrlino. 

I VOI I Upera riOUSe- Proprietor and Manager. 

Every evening: a lint show; the laughter triumph; the spec 
taoular extravaganza, 

BLUE BEARD. 

(In summer attire). Great cast; superb scenery; beauteous 

imos; new songs, dunces, sklta 
Next— Finish of (ho comlo opera season, WrtNG. 
Mai itnr Bfttordu al j "dock. 
Popular Prices : fco. and 600. Our telephone. Bush 0. 



C_| M „L' TL«-,J..-^ Gottlob, Marx&Co., 
OlUmDia I heatre, Lesseos and Managers. 

Beginning Monday, sixth week of the season. Charles Fronman 
presents 

HENRY MILLER 

and 

f\ SPECIAL COMPANY 
Last six nights; matinee Saturday. 

LORD AND LADY ALGY. 
July 24th— Heartsease. 



California Theatre. 



S. H. Fkiedlander, 



Manager. 

Tremendous success of MISS BLANCHE BATES and com- 
pany of players. Ovations at every performance. 
Commencing with Monday evening, July 17th. Magnificent pro- 
duction of 

THE DANGING GIRL, 

with Blanche Bates as "Drusllla Ives." And all the prominent 
members of the Frawley Company In leading roles. 
Reserved seats, 25c, 50c, 75c, and $1. Tel. Main 1731. 

n\ T'L i. Fred Belasoo, Lessee. Mark Thall, 

rAICaZar I heaxre. Manager. 'Phone Main 2M. 

Week of July 17th. 

THE NEW MAGDELEN, 

With the talented Florence Robkrts and the Alcazar stock Company 
supporting, in a play with a soul, brilliant in dialogue, masterly 
in situations, and rich in settings aud wardrobe. First time at 
popular prices. 
Our prices, reserved: 15c. 25c, 35c , 5"c. 

Oi San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell St. 

rpneUm. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Sunday matinee July 16th. Direct from Eng- 
land, 

KILPATRICK Z> BARBER, 

Great trick bicycle riders ; Direct from the Olympia, Paris, Les 
Browns, the only monopede aerobits in the world; re-*-ngage- 
ment lor one week only of the Pasqualis. in salentiors from i 'av- 
alleria Rusticana' the great Bouuini, l<ing of handcuffs, in new 
an sensational feats; Minnie Palmer in new specialties; the 
Rixfords Hayes &Lytton in a new act; George Wilson, Mono- 
logist; iVIilllan& Shields. 

Reserved seats 25o; baloonylOc; opera chairs and box seats 
50c. Matinees Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. 

London and San FrancisGo Bank, Limited. 

Authorized Capital 83,6 n 0,000 

Capital Subsciibed and Fully Paid 2,450,000 

N. D. Rideout. Managing D rector. Gustav Friederich, Cashier. 
Arthur L. Black, Assistant Cashier. 

Head office: 71 Lombard street, London. Portland Branch, Chamber of 
Commerce Building. Tacoma Branch, 1156 Pacific avenue. 

Bankers— Bank of England. London Joint Stock Bank, Limited. 

Agents in New York— J P Morwan&Co 

This bank is prepared to grant letters of credit available in any part of 
the world and to transact every description of Banking and Exchange 
business. 

WORTHINQTON AMES, 

member Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In Stooks, Bonds, and Munlolpal Securities. 

188 Montgomery St., S. P. Tel. Blaok 2028. 



BLAKE, MOFFIT & TOWNE 



Dealers In 



Telephone 
Main 199. 



Paper 



Blake, Mofflt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake, McFall& Co., Portland, Or. 



55, 67, 59, 81 First St. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1899. 




" Hear the Crier ? " "What the devil art thou?" 
"One that will play the devil, sir. with you." 

THE Peace Conference at The Hague is producing re- 
sults. The Dutch are protesting against English 
trespass upon Oom Paul. The under-Secretary of War, 
George Wyndham, admitted on Monday in the House of 
Commons that the Government was supplying British 
troops in South Africa with tons of bullets similar to the 
barbarous "dum-dum" variety, (at which the Irish mem- 
bers yelled "Shame ! ") and our own ordnance department 
is chuckling itself into a fit of apoplexy over a new ex- 
plosive that is to be used in tearing the insides out of the 
gentle Filipino for the fertilization of the rice and 
cane fields. This last cheerful peace-maker is so terrific 
in execution that its shock will kill and its impact rend 
guns asunder. Its awful force will burst the bloodvessels 
in men's heads, tear out their eyes, and lay open their 
thick and ignorant skulls that peace may enter. These 
triumphs of inventive and sanguinary genius have all been 
given birth since the Peace Conference was called, and 
their brave announcement since the soothing voice of sweet 
prayer opened the Peace Council at The Hague. Give us 
but another convocation of olive branches and we shall 
enrich the lean earth with the blood of the universe and 
solder up the cracks in physical nature's frame with the 
decaying bodies of murdered millions. Where, oh where, 
is General Dickenson, the hero of Sacramento and other 
things ? 

JUDGES Treadwell and Mogau are not in league with 
the devil; they simply have an aversion to antagonize 
the percentage poker games vote of the city. The learned 
Judges are afraid of their shadows. If they would fear 
God and promote the execution of the laws against such 
colleges of crime and kindergartens of penitentiaries as 
the infamous Cafe Royal has proven itself to be, they would 
lay up votes in the ballot-box and retire from circulation 
numberless minions of Satan. Traces of moral courage 
are to be expected in the judiciary, and frequent disap- 
pointments in this direction do not seem to dull the public 
conscience nor obscure the facts. Backbone is as needful 
to a judge as a knowledge of law. 

ONE of the Methodist ministers bewails the fact that 
Henry Crocker has formed a trust whereby grape- 
growers of this State may get an advance of $4 a ton over 
present prices; and because of this arrangement wine 
would be more expensive. The starvation price of the 
juice of the grape has been the seed of many a mortgage 
in this State, and Henry Crocker's commendable trust will 
mean as much to the grape-growers as Heaven sent 
manna to the Children of Israel; the only difference being 
that Henry Crocker's extra four dollars are worth one 
hundred cents each, while the heavenly food is subject to a 
very heavy discount. 

IN all ages, the man who betrays another into the hands 
of his pursuers, for money, has been held in contempt; 
without respect to the crime of the fugitive. The key-hole ' 
spy and the eaves-dropper are regarded as objects to be 
handled with a pair of tongs. Dr. Decker heard of the 
escaped Boston fugitive, Baker, and after locating him, 
offered to betray the stranger for $500. The price was too 
high; but when he fell to forty (not thirty) pieces of silver, 
the deal was closed. The thrifty doctor drifts naturally 
into the calling to which he is best fitted. 

S DISPATCH from Washington says, in referring to 
pension frauds, that "Congress has recognized the 
fact that there are dishonest pension attorneys." Great 
heaven 1 Is the fraudulent pension shysters so little known 
that the startling announcement of their thieving propen- 
sities is telegraphed across the ccuntry as news? Indeed, 
this is the silly season. 



PRESIDENT Benjamin Ide Wheeler, of Cornell, has 
arrived, and last Tuesday attended a meeting of the 
Regents of the State University at Berkeley. He has 
also been interviewed, and every friend of true education 
will hope that he may accept the office tendered him at 
Berkeley. The curse of the institution |has been too 
much interference by the Regents — too much friction. 
There have been too many fingers in the pie, and Wheeler 
declares that no such conditions prevail at any other col- 
lege as have strewn and made rocky the educational high- 
way at the State institution. Small fish that have floun- 
dered about in the Board of Regents, and obscured the 
light by the projection of their opaque persons upon the 
Berkeley vision, will be deftly kicked off the stage when 
President Wheeler grasps the reins. 

REFRIGERATED atmosphere has been handed out to 
the departments about the City Hall. The tax- 
eaters' brigades, that wear out their trousers doing noth- 
ing, are face to face with a hard proposition. Many of 
them will find it necessary to steal or get at work. Their 
choice, taken independently of possible punishment, may 
be regarded as doubtful High salaries and low intelli- 
gence develop a degree of arrogance that finds the con- 
templation of ten hours' work at two dollars per day as 
difficult and as little desirable as a tussle with the black 
plague. The dollar limit is the limit of worth of these 
hangers-on, who now find themselves hesitating undecided 
before horny-handed toil, suicide, and the jail. 

OREGON should not harsnly criticise her gallant sons 
for wanting to be mustered out at San Francisco. 
Their desire to enjoy the blessings of God's country at the 
earliest possible moment should not be construed as disre- 
spectful to the Webfoot State. The red-cheeked apples 
and the red-cheeked girls of our northern neighbor can 
wait until the Volunteers have found their land legs 
again. They will be well cared for by the people of this 
peninsula. Their choice shows a sense of fine discrimina- 
tion. 

GENTLEMEN elected last fall with the distinct under- 
standing that their official existence would terminate 
at the end of the year, who now plead the baby act and 
are fighting for four years, will be buried so deep, if the 
Supreme Court turns them down, that no seismic disturb- 
ance will ever bring them to the surface again. Their 
play is too palpably a bold confidence game, with not even 
the quality of originality to give it grace. 

EX-COLLECTOR Welburn will not be convicted of any 
crime; but it is vastly amusing to note that his bonds- 
men are to be sued for the $41,000 which was stolen dur- 
ing his administration. The gentlemen now asked to dig 
up this money should secure the valuable services of the 
eight citizens who on Welburn's first trial were of opinion 
that he had done no wrong. By skillful manipulation there 
should be no trouble in saving the most of that $41,000. 

FRANK Maguire is a pickpocket, caught red-handed in 
the very act. In sentencing him to six months in the 
county jail — which perhaps had better been six years — 
Judge Conlan said that "influential politicians had inter- 
ceded for him." The Judge should have told the whole 
truth, and thus let the people know what prominent poli- 
ticians are friends of thieves. 

LAWYER Jackson of Santa Barbara is now claimed by 
Yda Addis Storke as her contract husband. If there 
is any likelihood of the lady's making out a case, Jackson 
probably wishes that her effort to pistol him to death had 
not been thwarted. 

SGNEWS Asylum scandal is being investigated, and the 
trusty, Cooper, appears to be the creature of ut- 
terly brutal cast. There ought to be found for him no 
asylum in this State nor in the world. The breath of 
such monsters pollute the very air. 

SENATOR William E. Mason, of Illinois, predicts that 
next year every political party will have a plank in 
its platform declaring for Philippine freedom. Like every 
other true American, he would scorn to see the old flag 
wave above a race of slaves. 

JUDGING from the activity in the manufacture and 
use of the automobile, San Francisco may shortly be 
called an automobilious city. 



July 15, 1899. 



FRANCISCO XiiWS LETTER. 



»3 




PER30NAL-lf your h«ir la not ■•tiifactory it can ba made ao 

Iraf hair 

■ t hair 

'«. Imperial 



WHILE the majority of our girls are scattered among 
the different resorts in the country, h 
amusement and profit combined, and are heard to 
over the lack of the male element partoiu, the girls at the 
several army posts around the city are reveling in numer- 
ous young lieutenants, all more or less flirtatiously in- 
clined. 

* a a 

We hear a good deal nowadays of the way in which the 
dear creature, woman, pushes to the front, ousting men 
from positions of stenographers, cashiers, bookkeepers, 
typewriters, and the like, and in many — nay, most cases 
— the complaint is a just one. It is getting to be an alarm- 
ing question with the masculines as to where this is to 
stop. Already the back step of the cars is taken posses- 
sion of by women when a man is wanting his morning 
smoke, and now the women seem to prefer the back step 
and platform, letting the men hang on to the edge of the 
dummy, while seats inside the car go begging. The great 
fear is, are we to go a step further, and like the British, 
have women bar maids ? 

* * * 

The daily press, though extremely outspoken in most 
things, has been singularly reticent regarding the attitude 
of the colored soldiers toward the Philippine war. It is 
well known in military circles that the five companies of 
the 24th (colored) Infantry while here lost some fifteen 
men per company. Long enlisted men threw up their 
service because the present war was distasteful. They 
did not believe in aggression. Men claimed exemption 
from service on the score of being married, and others 
hastily acquired wives, so as to avoid going. This is the 
exact state of affairs, and yet this veracious press sup- 
pressed the news, and deliberately said that the negroes 
were eager to go across seas and slaughter Filipinos. Sen- 
timental young women, whose crude English prompts them 
to believe themselves to be heaven-inspired writers, have 
been giving us large doses of their sickly outpourings, but 
at this stage of the game what the public wants is truth, 
and not balderdash. 

* * * 

There is an old chap in town who is given to "running 
with the boys," and is the laughing stock of the women he 
meets in those rambles. He is affianced to a woman far 
above him in every way, and whom he deceives with per- 
severing boldness. It is high time she should know the 
truth and see this elderly Lothario in his true colors. 



To a reflective mind, how simply astounding it seems 
that women (girls and married women alike) can be found 
who are so lost to the consequences of discovery in taking 
such risks as they do in "little dinners," Q. T. evenings in 
bachelor quarters, and champagne suppers. 

* * * 

A story is afloat that a somewhat noted sportsman 
made a catch recently which has embarrassed him not a 
little. When a fish falls into one's net without even hav- 
ing been angled for, 'tis seldom appreciated, and this case 
is said to be something in that style. 

* * * 

Lake County is agog over a spicy bit of gossip which as 
yet has not reached town in all its details. 

Very latest things in the art world are to be seen at Morris', 248 
Sutter street. New and artistic articles are continually arriving. 
Special attention given to framing. Sole agent lor Moulton's cele- 
brated photographs. 

Liquid cosmetics being considered so much more suitable to any com- 
plexion: the beneficial effects upon the skin, together with its absolute 
freedom from any poisonous ingredients, make Creme de Lis the one per- 
fect liquid cosmetic. 

Pine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co . 746 
Market street, San Franoisoo. 

Fob S5 years Jacksoa's Napa Soda has led all mineral waters. 



I ; and 



Market 



« 1 1 1 1 ? 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 i 1 j,ai,4, a a 4 

I College San Rafael 

1 For Young Ladies. 



a.t..ti<i.».4. A 



Conducted by the Sisters or St. Domlnlo. 
Pull colleglc course of studios. A boarding school of highest '■ 
grade. Superb modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful 
and commodious elass rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley. X 
Unsurpassed for beauty and bealthfulness. Address, 



MOTHER SUPERIOR, 
College San Rafael. San Rafael, Gal 



Irving Institute 



Select BoardiDg and Day 

School for young ladles 

2126 CALIFORNIA ST., S- F- 

Next session will begin August 7th. Accredited to the Universities. 
Seminary and Pull Conservatory of Music. Primary Department for chil- 
dren. Carriage will call. For further information, address the Principal, 

REV. EDWARD B. CHURCH, A. M. 



[Founded 1876. 1 

3300 Washington St 

tsan Francisco. 



Trinity School, 

Boarding and Day School for Young Men and Boys 

Prepares for University and College; accredited with the Univer- 
sity of California and LelaDd Stanford University. A Faculty of 
eleven Professors and Teachers. Boarders limited to thirty five. 
Christmas Term opens August 1st 

Rev. Dr. B. B. Spalding, Rector. 



H. J: STEWART, Mus. D. 

Has removed his Music Studio to 

1406 Van Ness Avenue, 
Between Bush and Pine. 

The Solly Walter School of Illustration 

Wil ire-open August 1st for the fall and winter term. 

26 O'Farrell St- 

PROF. WALTER WATSON, gS n * °T%^?T U Z£ 

Lessons private, in class, or at your residence. 

417 ELLIS STREET, S F..CAL. 

San Francisco Dress=Cutting School, 

French tailor method taught. Full course of instruction in the 
art of Dressmaking. Patterns out to oroer. Terms reasonable. 
Men and women teachers employed. 

2 02 GROVE ST. S. F. J ^_ 

SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION, DELSARTE, AND VOICE CULTURE. 

Acting and Stage Technique. Course of 75 lessons $50. 
Zoe Rice, 412 McAllister street, Department 3, San Francisco. 

SCIENTIFIC DRtSS-CUTTING' SIMPLIFIED, 

Just our,; something new; wonderful tailor system of Paris, France; the 
most simple, accurate, and rnpid system in the world for cutting Ladies 1 , 
Children's, and Gent's Garments. Ftr.stten pupils half price. 

Mme. Coon, 504 Eddy street. S. F. 



Weak Men and Women 



Should use DAMIANA BIT- 
TERS, the great Mexican rem- 
edy ; it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs Depot at 328 Mar- 
street. San Francisco. Send for circular. 



M 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1899. 



The development of the great oil belt 
The Oil Industry in Central California bids fair to be- 
of California. come one of the most important indus- 
tries in the State. Now that success 
has crowned the efforts of a few men who have managed 
to struggle along for years past in face of all manner of 
disheartening conditions, the capital which they once 
sought in vain is now pouring in on them, and a boom in 
oil shares is not far distant. The investment has become 
popular, and the people who sneered at a proposition of 
the kind a few months ago are now the most eager to par- 
ticipate in the profits which will eventually result from 
the efforts of a few enterprising spirits, to whom all credit 
is due for this new addition to the revenue of California. 
For this product there is always a market, independent of 
unfavorable conditions, which mar, from time to lime, the 
most carefully executed plans skillfully and economically 
managed by the fruit grower and farmer. A certain 
price per gallon can always be obtained for oil, with the 
whole world for a market, storage being possible for an un- 
limited period without deterioration. There is nothing new 
about the discovery of oil in California. Its existence has 
been known for many years past, the only difference being 
that it is at last recognized as worthy of attention, now 
the flow from one or two wells is making money rapidly 
for their owners. The number of claims recorded in 
Kings, Fresno, and Kern counties is growing daily, and, 
from all appearances, there will soon be little land avail- 
able in this section of the State, good, bad, aDd indiffer- 
ent, which has not been staked out. It must be remem- 
bered that at least fifty per cent, of the promoters of com- 
panies now in the business are not much interested in the 
development of oil. They propose to make hay while the 
sun shines by disposing of certain lands for goodly sums of 
money. Should oil be developed then by accident, well 
and good. If not, the investors will have gained some ex- 
perience. The oil belt, like the Mother Lode, becomes 
very flexible in the hands of schemers, winding in and out 
at a lively pace on paper, so as to include the particular 
piece of property offered for sale. For this reason in- 
tending investors should be careful to satisfy themselves 
by investigation outside of the influences brought to bear 
on their pockets, that the ground involved in the bargain 
is really situated in the oil zone. They can readily satisfy 
themselves upon this point by interrogating reputable 
men who have been engaged in the business for years, and 
who have prospected every foot of likely ground to be 
found within miles on either side of the belt. The investor 
who neglects this advice will be sure to meet with disaster 
sooner or later. 

Some of the smartest men in the 
A Fixed Spring business are apt to fall victims to 

Yields Large Returns, sharpers now in the field, SO that 
it behooves the less skillful to be 
upon their guard. Within the past thirty days an old sheep- 
berder got away with a large sum of money from a couple 
of old-time prospectors representing considerable capital, 
who were bled to the tune of $100,000. It appears that 
the shepherd, who knew that these men were on the look- 
out for oil indications, concocted a scheme to fleece them, 
which he managed to carry into effect in a manner which 
shows that a great brain was in place under his tattered 
old sombrero. His trap was baited with a bag of oil ab- 
stracted from a flowing well not far away. Thi« was sunk 
deep in a spring located on the sheep-run, so that the oil 
could exude slowly and tincture the water sufficiently 
to furnish the necessary "indications." In due time along 
came the prospectors, and an acquaintance was scraped 
with them, when, in the course of conversation, it leaked 
out that their mission so far away from home was to 
find oil. They would not have far to go for that, quoth 
the guileless shepherd, who seemed the simplest Reu- 
ben ever born on the county side. If that dirty look- 
ing black stuff', bottled up and shown him as a sample, 
was oil, why, he just knew where to put his finger on it 
within easy distance. The trio wasted no time before 
starting for the spring where the water was covered with 



the well-known shiny coating, the seepage heavy also, 
abundant evidence that the bag was fulfilling faithfully its 
part in the programme. The experts were satisfied, from 
a visual and olfactory standpoint. The shepherd was appar- 
ently a careless and amused spectator of the enthusiasm he 
had helped to excite. This finally wound up with a round 
bid of $100,000 for the entire strip of land, which pro- 
voked a howl of derision from the grizzled guardsman of the 
sheepfold. "What, pay me $100,000," he cried, "for a 
derned old patch of alkali ? Whv, 'taint worth as many 
cents. You must be a pair of bigger chumps than I took 
you for." This trumped the trick, and in time the shep- 
herd was persuaded that for the sake of com- 
mon honesty he must accept the amount offered 
in lieu of the fortune he had ignored so long lying 
right under his feet. A few days later he was 
paid the money and decamped with it for parts unknown. 
Since then he has been invisible, so is the oil, the spring 
having resumed normal conditions after the "chumps" 
removed the bag, which they dropped upon in the course 
of their first exploration work. 

There is quite a number of Reubens 
Big Money in of this character in the field just 

Legitimate Ventures, now, and their work is equally as 
clever. Both of the men who suf- 
fered by the "bag" game are shrewd business men of this 
city, not easily fooled upon any proposition, but o ; l was 
new to them. The next time they turn their attention in 
this direction it will pay them to take advice from some 
one who is posted upon " indications." In this city com- 
panies are springing up with the rapidity of mushrooms, 
and it is not difficult for any one with ordinary experience 
to separate the wheat from the chaff among them. The 
mark of the charlatan is not easily disguised, and the wild- 
cat operator resembles so closely the street faker in the 
methods adopted to sell his wares that none but the gulli- 
ble can be deceived. Mishaps of the kind will not, how- 
ever, interfere to any extent with the legitimate opera- 
tions of men on the belt, who know that it is only a matter 
of time after sinking begins before profits commence to come 
in. Companies like this have no reason to publish ex- 
travagant inducements, based upon a lot of absolutely 
false statements, for investment, not one of which is ever 
likely to be realized. It is only a matter of time until peo- 
ple get educated up to the same standard in the oil business 
as they are upon other propositions in the line of trade, 
and then the productive zone will be located within its 
proper boundaries to the exclusion of the wild-cat con- 
cerns and their thieving manipulators. 

Among the recent organizations in this 
The Star city for development of oil properties in 

Oil Company. Fresno county is the Star Oil Company, 
capitalized at $300,000 in 30,000 shares at 
$10 each. The company, after careful investigation made 
by experts, has secured title to fine lands lying in the oil 
belt, as determined by the trend and disposition of the 
wells already in operation. The " Blue Goose" the " Coal- 
inga" and the " Home Oil Companies," whose aggregate 
daily output is 2000 barrels, are in a direct line with the 
lands of the Star Oil Company. From the surface indica- 
tions of their lands, it seems impossible that there should 
not be abundant wells struck on its property, for they are 
identical with those found on the properties which are 
spouting fortunes every week. The original owners of the 
lands are largely interested in the company, and there 
remain 16,000 shares, subscription for 10,000 shares of 
which are invited by the company on the basis of $3 per 
share, to be paid in three equal monthly payments of $1 
each. This money will be used in developing the prop- 
erty of the company. Machinery will be purchased and 
expert well borers set at work sinking on the property. 
The opportunity for profitable investment is great. The 
shares are low and the payments easy, and once oil is 
struck, they will be worth ten times or one hundred times 
their present asking value, according to the flow of the 
wells. Oil taken from the Coalinga fields sells readily at 
$1 per barrel, and there is an increasing demand for it. 
Reservoirs are talked of, to be built at favorable locali- 
ties, and pipe lines to reach stations on the Southern Pa- 
cific and Santa Fe Railroads. A map of the Company's 
property is published herewith. Its officers and directors 
are: H. Francis President, Henry Van Bergen Vice-Pres 



July 15, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



•5 






19 



i 



3* 



+ 



-99 



-39- 



\-6 



-8+- 



-ee- 



3B 



IO II 






-99- 



-*7- 



-S3 



-96 






94 



S5- 



36- 



TOWXSniP IS SOUTH. BANGS ;.. ^JST", J/if DIABLO BASE AND 
MERIDIAN. 



In See. f— Union Oil Co. 

t7~0hanttor db Cantieltf. 
to—Coalinga Oil Co. 

Home on Co . BOO lo 1,1 mo 
bolt, daily 
Blue Gooee, 



ft Set SO— New Forte Oil Company, 

" Selma Oil Company. 

Mutual Oil Cotnjiarn/ 
'• is— Oil Cioj Petroleum Co. 
" H — The Star Oil Company. 
" m— Great Western Oil Co. 



ident, Geo. W. Terrill, E. B. Haldan, S. H. Daniels, Di- 
rectors; Attorney, Vincent Neale; Secretary, R. W. 
Heath; Treasurer, Bank of California. Its offices are at 
rooms 306-7-8, 503 California street, this city. 

There is a great deal of activity in 
Continental Oil and the Coalinga oil fields. Among 
Development Co. others the Continental Oil & Devel- 
opment Company is sinking on its 
property, with every indication of finding oil in large quan- 
tities. As the land owned by the company is in the min- 
eral belt, oil seepages on every side of it and wells in 
operation near by, it can only be a question of a short 
time before oil will be struck. Nearly all the stock offered 
for sale has been taken. The outlook for this company is 
very bright. 

IT is a fact worthy of more than ordinary interest just 
at this time when great developments in the oil fields 
California are being made, to note that foreign capital is 
seeking its way into California and going into oil. Within 
the past ten days a large block of the stock of the Park- 
field Oil Company, operating in Monterey County, has 
been placed by a local broker, in Germany. As may be 
remembered, the News Letter sent a representative into 
that district, and bis report resulting from personal obser- 
vation, was of a most flattering character. Every indica- . 
tion points to an immense field in the Cholame Valley where 
the company is now doing development work. 

The death of Mr. Kervin, the well- 
The Passing of known Comstock Superintendent, will 
Patrick Kervin. be a source of sincere regret to all his 

friends. He was a man who will be 
missed in the sphere of life in which he moved. As the 
trusted expert of the biggest mining men in the western 
world he was widely known and respected, his record being 
one which leaves little room for unfriendly criticism. He was 
a native of County Wexford, Ireland, where he was born 
sixty-three years ago. He came to California in 1861, re- 
siding at Grass Valley for some years, when he moved to 
Utah and became connected with the management of the 
Ontario mine. After staying there for a number of years 
he returned to California as expert for Haggin & Tevis, 
leaving them eventually to enter the employ of the Bonanza 
firm, with whom he has ever since been closely connected. 
For many years he has been superintendent of Gould & 
Curry. Best & Belcher, Utah, assuming charge of Con.- 
Cal. -Virginia upon the retirement of Mr. D. B. Lyman. 
He died from an operation following a severe attack of 
pneumonia. A wife and three children survive him. 



■vs from i t around < 

A Cripple Cr»»i . mity county, rontinu. 

In California. lish the I miog 

bonanza camp of thi 
dcrfiil rrs 111 obtained from the Yellow Rose of 

Texas Mine, which v the lirst | 

Ide attention to the probabilities of the district. 
recently sacked from this mine assayed ♦loo per 
sack of lull pounds. On the Loftus claim near thy- 
mine, ore of the value of Slnnii is being deposited daily on 
the dump. The ores are all a high-grade quartz, carry- 
ing sylvanite and gold, the percentages running as high 
as ever Cripple Creek did. If this district was in any 
other part of the world than California, it would have 
been famous long ago. The trouble Is, it is too near home. 
Its merits, however, will be recognized some day, when 
the properties pass into the hands of outsiders, like 
the Iron Mountain and others of our greatest wealth pro- 
ducers have done in the past. 

The Kootenay Gold Mines on 
London Absorbs Another Perry Creek, British Columbia, 
Western Mine. have been floated in London, 

with a capital of £60,000. The 
vendors are the promoters of the company, the purchase 
price being £35,000, payable £7,000 in cash and the bal- 
ance in fully-paid shares. The ore is said to average $15 
per ton. 

The Pretoria News says that Mr. John 

Another Big Fee Hays Hammond has received a re- 

for Hammond. tainer of close on £50,000 for putting 

the Randfontein group of mines on a 

proper footing. 

AVERY important change is reported in the Gwin 
mine. A parallel ledge has been cut in the lower 
workings, increasing the value of the prospect immensely. 

Following are the transactions on the 
Stock and Bond Stock and Bond Exchange from July 
Quotations. 8th to July 13th inclusive, being six days 
transactions. There were no sales Fri- 
day, the same being the last day of vacation : 

Miscellaneous Bonds. Sales 

Perries and Cliff House Ry 6% 25,000 ffl 117 

Market Street lstCons. Mortgage 5% 11,000 @ 116X 

Nev. Co. Narrow Gauge Ry7°„ 1.01)0 @ 110 

Nor. Railway of California t>% 4,000 @ 118S£ 

Oakland Transit Co- 6% 12,000 @ 107J* 

So. Pacific of Arizona 6% 19.000 <5> 1 K.14-HOV4 

So. Pacific Branch 6% 8.000 ® 1243£ 

s. v. w. w. 6% 8.000 <a ilex 

" 4% ...24,000 @ 101-104M 

4% 3rds 4,000 @ 101 

STOCKS. 
Water. Shakes. 

Contra Costa Water 355 

Spring Valley Water 388 

Gas and Electric. 

Equitable Gas 50 

Mutual Eleotrio 250 

Oakland Gas 65 

Pacifio Gas Improvement 20 

Gas and Electric 777 

S F. Gas 5 

Stkeet Railroads. 

Market Street 200 

POWDERS. 

Giant 370 

Vlgorit 100 

Sugar Stocks. 

HanaP.Co 160 

Hawaiian C & S Co 10 

Hutchinson S Plantation Co. .. 880 

Makewell 2,130 

Onomea PI 20 

Paauhau SP Co 1,285 

Miscellaneous. 

Alaska Packers Association — 100 

Oceanic S S Co 745 

Pacific Coast Borax Co 45 

California Safe Deposit 25 an aa 

The transactions during the week amounted to 8,080 shares and 
111 000 bonds, against 9,441 shares and 80,500 bonds of the week 
previous to the Board's vacation. 

The stock of the Makeweli Sugar Company was regularly listed on 
the Exchange on Tuesday, and is selling for 47%. This Company 
will pay a dividend of 40c a month, beginning on the 15th inst. of 
this month. The plantation is large, with a 13.000 ton crop, and at 
this figure the stock nets 10 per cent, per annum. The Contra 
Costa Water Company will hold a stockholder's meeting on the 20th 
of August, and it is expected that shortly after this the Company 
will declare regular dividends. It is rumored that the Santa Fe 
has bought the controlling interest in the stock of the Oakland Tran- 
sit Company. 

See Rome and die. Drink Jackson's Napa Soda and live. 



Highest. 


Lowest. 


78^ 
101 


72« 
101V4 


15V5 
49 
71 
71 % 
3/5 


B>6 
15 

48 
71 
70 
3!4 


61* 


61 


74 
3% 


71 


11% 
98H 
333 
47K 
40J£ 
40J£ 


99 !4 
33^ 
47* 
40M 
40K 


113K 
CO* 
135 


113M 
87 
130K 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1899. 




MR. James Dockery, Mr. O'Brien, and two other gentle- 
men of distinguished positions and irreproachable 
manners, determined on the Fourth to ride in the parade. 
They got on the ground early, and selecting the best car- 
riage in the bunch, proceeded to make themselves com- 
fortable. This vehicle had been reserved for the Mayor, 
but that did not disturb the equanimity of the quartette. 

"Ah, ha !" said Dockery, as he was approached by the 
ever-present T. P. Robinson, "you say this is the Mayor's 
carriage. I guess not. It is mine now." 

Then came up some Supervisors, who looked hungrily at 
the carriages, and finally Mr. Collins was selected as a 
spokesman. 

"Say," said Collins to Mr. O'Brien, "I am a Super- 
visor, and I want to know where I am going to find a car- 
riage." 

"The deuce ye are," said Mr. O'Brien, "and the deuce 
I care." 

"I think," continued Mr. Collins with some dignity, 
" that we Supervisors should have had some carriages set 
apart for us." 

"Do you, indeed?" cried Mr. Dockery; "in faith, I think 
ye should have had some set apart for you." 

"Oh, yes, indeed; and don't you think, Mr. Dockery, 
that we should have this carriage?" 

"The devil ye do," bawled Mr. O'Brien, thoroughly in- 
dignant. "If ye Supervisors want a carriage go and get 
an express wagon. Them's good enough for Supervisors." 



Officer G°orge Lake, who has the reputation of being 
among the finest of the finest in Captain Dunlevy's charge, 
was assailed, knocked down, and terribly thumped by a 
Polsom street car the other day. Mr. Lake then went to 
the Harbor Hospital and left there odoriferous with iodo- 
form. He could be sniffed for blocks. When the graceful 
hand of George Lake assumed its proper proportion he 
indited a warning and gentle letter to Mr. Vining asking 
the Sage of the Consolidated System to give a hint to that 
motorman not to charge down East street at so furious a 
pace. Now, Mr. Vining is "a literary gent" and he quite 
appreciated the art of letter writing, so down he sat and 
poured forth to Georgie Lake a string of long and valua- 
ble advice how best to board a car without getting hurt. 
George is to look where he goes, halt a car when he steps 
on, and incidentally Georgie is reminded not to overlook 
his nickel. This last hint was the climax of Mr. Vining's 
well-written letter. 



Mr. Fred Myrtle of the Press Club is a gentleman of 
most distinguished appearance, a baritone voice, and a 
fund of that irrepressible modesty which never wants to 
be well shaken. The gentlemen of the Press Club were 
doing the bay on Captain Seale's steamer, and Myrtle, 
who has a voice, wanted to give it an airing. He deli- 
cately hinted to several of the gentlemen present that he 
could warble his ever-famous song, "Oh, Can It Be Pos- 
sible," with even greater sweetness afloat than ashore. 
Finally one gentleman suggested that Myrtle sing his song. 
He was led to the piano by a young lady to whom he 
hummed the tune, and then the song began. 

"Gentlemen," said Myrtle, "please join in the chorus, 
'Oh, can it be possible ! ' " 

The gentlemen assented. 

" I went into the lion's den and pulled his tail," but in- 
stead of the charming words, "Oh, can it be possible" 
there came as a thunderclap from a clear heaven the 
brutal refrain: 

" What the do we care ! " 

Myrtle has never since sung that song. 



The national president of the Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union, Mrs. Stevens, recently made a trip through 
California in the interests of her organization. She is well 
and widely known as a leading emancipationist and re- 
former of her down trodden sex, as well as a prohibitionist. 

While she was travelling through one of the southern 
counties of the State, she met on the train a gentleman 
whom she had known in Philadelphia. Their pleasure at 
meeting so unexpectedly was expressed with such frank- 
ness and fervor as to greatly amuse the other passengers. 

At a portion of the road where there were none of the 
indications of the dry year so painfully in evidence else- 
where, a beautifully green field came into view. The ex- 
Philadelpbian went into ecstasies over it. 

" What a splendid meadow!" he exclaimed. "There's 
richness for youl I would just roll in it if I were a cow." 

" I don't see," remarked the lady reformer, urbanely, 

"that the mere matter of sex need deter you." 

* * * 

Doctor Scovil, the President of Wooster University, was 
in the city last week on his way to the meeting of the 
National Educational Association in Los Angeles. In 
addition to his rank as an educator, Dr. Scovil is also a 
minister of the Presbyterian Church. Among the congre- 
gations which he has visited during his stay in San Fran- 
cisco is one where the representatives of the male sex are 
conspicuous by their absence. The pastor is accustomed 
to quote with unusual emphasis, the words of the Psalmist: 

" O that men would praise the Lord for His goodness," 
and describes himself with alliteration's artful aid as 
ordinary preaching to "benches, bibs and bonnets." 

This divine consulted President Scovil as to the advis- 
ability of introducing into the church certain societies 
which might liven matters a bit. 

"No, sir," firmly replied the philosophical educator, 
aptly and aphoristically, "what the gospel team needs is 
not more harness, but more horse!" 
# * * 

A man of prepossessing appearance and good address 
applied to General Warfield for a responsible position at 
the Hotel Rafael. The proprietor inquired what experi- 
e ice he had had. 

"I am thoroughly /n»i-experienced," rejoined the appli- 
cant, facetiously. 

"Thoroughly inexperienced," repeated the General, 
who did not see the joke. "Then don't you think, sir, that 
you have a d d lot of cheek to apply tome for a job?" 

"I'll write it out for you," he said to the nonplussed 
Brigadier-General, with the utmost sangfroid. 

And when the point had been properly diagrammed, the 
somewhat flustered and corpulent hotel proprietor gave 
the applicant the position which he sought. , 

* * * 

The secietary of a certain woman's club in this city is 
extremely conscientious in her work, carefully setting 
down with great fulness and in the choicest language every 
incident of the meetings, however trivial. Some of her 
associates call her long-winded, but the lady herself styles 
it "accurate amplification." 

Last Saturday the President announced in her most 
majestic manner, after calling the meeting to order: 

"The Secretary will now read the minutes." 

"She calls them minutes," commented the judge's wife, 
in a satirical and audible aside, "but they always seem 
like hours!'' 

» » » 

During the absence of the family in the country the 
Chinese cook was left in charge of the Sexton residence, 
3118 Washington street. The cook was given strict or- 
ders to stay in the house every night; but last Sunday 
night he went away, returning the following morning. The 
door was open, and the home turned upside down. Thieves 
had spent several hours there during the night, and they 
carried away everything of value they could lay their 
hands on. Had the Sexton valuables been placed in the 
vaults of the California Safe Deposit and Trust Company, 
no thief would have got his clutches on them. 

Ladies do not have to wear switches to cover up their defects if 
they use Smith's Dandruff Pomade in time, it cures dandruff, itch- 
ing scalp, stops falling hair and makes hair grow. Price 50c at all 
druggists. 



July 15, 1899. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'7 



OBITUARY. 



THE Buddeo death <>f Mme. II. /.iska, which occurred at 
her home. 17I< Sacramento street, at 11 o'clock on the 
evening of the 6th, was a g h to the many fi 

of that most estimable lady and prominent 
ame Ziska*s death was due to heart d 3he had 

been ailing, but there was no thought thai her lllnesf 
more than of temporary character, although she had oc- 
casionally been a sufferer from rheumatism. Madame 
Ziska enjoyed a very wide acquaintance in Sau Frui 
where she had lived for the past 30 years, much of which 
time she spent in conducting an institute for educating 
young ladies. She was a woman of many attainments, of 
much polish and warm friendships. Her sudden death 
prostrated ber daughter Mrs. Beatrice Jennings, whose 
home had been with her mother. To her the sympathy of 
many friends is extended in ber deep grief. The funeral 
service was conducted from the residence, and .vas largely 
attended by sorrowing friends. The remains were borne 
to Odd Fellows' Cemetery and cremated. 

Captain Goodall. News was received here last Wednes- 
day, from Droycott, Eng , of the death 
of Captain Edward Go •dall, senior member of the firm of 
Goodall, Perkins & Co., of San Francisco. Captain Good- 
all left this city five weeks ago, accompanied by his wife, 
to make a tour of the world. The news of his death came 
as a shock to his relatives and friends here, for he was in 
fairly good health when he went away. He was a courte- 
ous man, well-liked by every one with whom he came in 
contact. He leaves five children, three sons and two 
daughters — Captain C. M. Goodall, who is Superintendent 
of the Pacific Coast Steamship Co., Captain H. W Good- 
all, S. E. Goodall, who is in business in Seattle; and Mrs. 
Hugo D. Keil of this city, and Mrs. Bland, of Pasadena. 
Deceased came to this Coast early in the '50"s, when he 
embarked in the steamship business, with which he was 
identified until his death. He died very suddenly, and the 
exact cause of his demise is not now known. Captain 
Goodall was 74 years old. 

Litchfield. A short time ago J. M. Litchfield took his 
family to Highland Springs, anticipating a 
pleasant summer's outing, but the family returned to the 
city early this week, bringing with them the remains of a 
little son who died at that place last Sunday. The boy 
who had been ailing for some time was stricken with 
appendicitis, and as the child grew worse it was deemed 
necessary to perform an operation iu order to save his 
life, but he was too weak to survive the ordeal. The 
boy was 11 year and 10 months old — a bright manly little 
fellow. The funeral took place from the residence on last 
Tuesday, and was attended by many friends of the sorrow- 
ing family. 

THERE is a great deal of adulteration iu olive oil— and 
purity is indispensable to a wholesome product. Among 
the few brands sold in this country is Nicelle Olive Oil. 
made in Nice, France, and it is used without question in 
the most exclusive restaurants and hotels in the French 
capital. Recently the celebrated chemists of New York 
Produce Exchange, Messrs. Stillwell & Gladding, made a 
careful analysis of this oil, which showed a smaller quantity 
of fatty acid than any other brand. In their report they 
say: " The Nicelle Oil is the best of all the samples an- 
alyzed, on account of the low percentage of free acid, as 
the amount of this is au index as to the sweetness of the 
oil and freedom from rancidity." 

"The Overland Limited," via Chicago, Union Pacific, and 
Northwestern Line. 
Only three and one-half days to Chicago. Four and one-half days 
to New York. Pullman Vestibuled Sleepers. Pullman Dining Cars. 
Pullman Tourist Sleepers. The "Overland Limited" leaves San 
Francisco every day in the year at 6 p. m. Cabin reservations made 
and steamship tickets sold to all parts of Europe. For full particu- 
Iftae and sleeper reservations address D. W. Hitchcock, General 
Agent, No. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

In times ol peace; in times of war, 
The favorite drink is Jesse Moore. 



For biliousness, constipation, torpid liver, sallow skin. 
Health Tablets. Ferry Drug Store, 8 Market street. 



use Baldwin's 



and SUPPLIES 



Mining Machinery 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 
Huntingdon Centrifugal Roller Mill 
Bartlett Concentrating Table 
James Ore Feeder 
Roger Improved Crushing Rolls 
Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers 
Two and Three Stamp Mills 
Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps 
Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery 

PARKE & LACY CO., 21 Bnd 23 Fremont 8treet. 8. K. 

JOSEPH FIGEL, MERCHANT TAILOR 

2d Floor Flood Building. Entrance Room 5. 

This is an invitation to accurate dressers— men 
who have been paying $50 to $1)5 for business suits 
— to look over our assortment of fancy cheviots and 
worsteds that we're making np from $30 to $50' 
It's quite an item, isn't it, to save $15 on a suit? 
Depend on being properly fitted, on correot styles 
and on excellent workmanship. 
There's a splendid assortment of trouserings, too. 



FIRST- 
CLASS 
CUSTOM 
TAILORING 
AT 

MODERATE 
COST. 



_) 



Hugh a, boyle 



(C. A. Helmquist, Cutter). 



FINE 



TAILORING 



Room 9 Flood Building 
San Francisco. 



Bon Marcne 
61othiQQ Renovatory 

40 Ellis Street, room 1-2. 



SUITS CLEANED 
AND PRESSED 



$1.00 



L. B. IMORDLUND 



BROUGHAMS AND COUPES (Rubber Tires.) 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE 

Nos. 57-59-61 Minna Street, Between First 
and Second. One block from Palace Hotel. 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, 
Corner Post and Stockton. Tel. Main 153. 
Every vehicle requisite for weddings, Par- 
ties, calling, shopping, business, or Pleas- 
ure. Special orders for four-in-hands. 
Tel. Main 153. 
J. Tomkinson, Prop'r. Established 1862. 

DR. BYRON W. HAINES 




813 Sutter Street, 
Tel. East 629. 



Dentist 



D. 



H. ISAAC dONES, M. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office, 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stookton Sts., S. P. 

Hours, 10 A. M. to 4 p. M. Sunday by appointment. 

Tel, grant 101. 

r»R n F nilNNF Of Olympic Club, Chiropodist, at Lucke's 
L»l\. U. U. UUIinL, shoe Store, 832 Market Street, S. F. 

Hours from 9 
specialty 



A. M. to 12 M. : 1 p. M. to 6 p. M. Ingrowing toe nails a 



Johtmim 

As a table water is unsurpassed. 

—London Mospitat Gazetti. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1899. 



PERSONALIS 



OF Li Hung Chang numberless stories are told in 
Chinese society. Now and then one reaches this 
country through our consuls at China. On one occasion 
when the premier was having a bitter fight with some of 
the more conservative members of the Tsung H-Yamen he 
received as a present a magnificent cake which he had 
reason to suspect contained poison. He put the cake aside 
and set all his powerful machinery to work to find out who 
was at the bottom of the plot. The investigation was 
partly successful, the crime being traced to three men, of 
whom one, at least, was absolutely guilty. Li had the 
trio arrested, and brought to his Yamen. When they 
arrived they were ushered into his presence and were re- 
ceived in his courtliest manner. The cake was produced 
with the remark that "politeness forbade his tasting it un- 
til the three generous donors had had an opportunity to 
enjoy its excellence." Li cut the cake and one of his ser- 
vitors handed it to the unwilling guests. Each took a 
piece and ate, or pretended to eat it. One crumbled the 
pieces and let them fal' upon the floor, but the other two 
ate calmly, without manifesting any emotion. Ten 
minutes and the two men began to show symptoms of 
suffering. Li smiled benignantly and said to the man who 
had not eaten: "Your wisdom is so great that I am com- 
pelled to preserve your head as a souvenir to transcendent 
genius." The man was removed and promptly decapitated. 
To the other two the premier remarked: "The cake that 
you are eating is not the one you sent, but one which I had 
my cook imitate. The poison from which you are suffer- 
ing exists only in your imagination. I know of no way to 
cure your present pain except by letting you share the 
same fate as your friend who has just left the room." As 
they were led away the statesman said to his retinue: "It 
is a pity that a man who can eat a deadly corrosive poison- 
ing with an unmoved countenance should so misapply the 
talent wherewith heaven has endowed him." 

Mile. Emma Calve is probably the only great prima 

donna who combines farming with her brilliant operatic 
achievements. She has a large farm at Cevennes, and 
rusticates there each summer. Last summer the famous 
singer went into her kitchen garden and cared for her 
own vegetables. No one was allowed to touch them, and 
the results were far better than when her gardener cared 
for the things. Mile. Calve wore a short skirt of blue jeans, 
sabots and a linen shirt waist. She spaded, and hoed, 
and watered her vegetables day after day, and proudly 
sent gifts of the finest fruits of her labor to her friends in 
Paris. The prima-donna was very ill and nervous when 
she went to Cevennes, but the free, open-air life and the 
vigorous exercise soon restored her to the most robust 
health, and when friends ask her the secret of her cure 
she always answers: "Spades and potatoes." Mile. Calve's 
chickens also come in for some of her attention, but the 
garden is her chief delight. 

It is a well-known fact that most sovereigns are 

early risers. The German Emperor is at work in his study 
by 5 A. St., while he is in the saddle by six o'clock, gener- 
ally accompanied by the Empress, who quite shares her 
husband's taste for early hours. The Queen-Regent of 
Spain makes a point of attending early Mass at six o'clock 
in the morning; while the Kings of Italy, Roumania and 
Wurtemberg are all early risers. The young Queen of the 
Netherlands rises at seven o'clock and has her breakfast 
before commencing her duties, and her mother makes a 
practice of also rising at this hour. King Oscar of Nor- 
way and Sweden is a very early riser, and generally spends 
the first hours in study, and after breakfast transacts 
State business. 

Robert T. Lincoln has purchased the farm upon 

which his father, Abraham Lincoln, was born. He will 
try and get Eastern capitalists interested to build a home 
upon it for the surviving indigent soldiers of the Civil War. 
Nothing more appropriate in the form of a monument to 
"Good Old Uncle Abe" could be thought of. 



JUT R. W. H. MILLS, of the Southern Pacific, has re- 
II ceived a section of pine from Siskiyou county, which 
demonstrates that the growth of a conifer may be accu- 
rately determined by the series of rings in its trunk, one 
ring for every year of life. This piece of pine was cut 
from a "bearing tree," and is two feet long and six inches 
thick, and on its inner face carries the bark which shows 
how ineffectually nature tried to heal the scars made by 
the surveyor in August, 1877, as shown by the field notes 
held by H. Cooley, who sent the wood. The tree was 
felled two years ago, split into pieces for use in the loco- 
motives, and with its strange record accidentally met 
Cooley's eye. Between the scars made by the Surveyor 
and the outer bark, there were the sections of twenty 
rings. 

General Funston writes a letter to a friend in this 

city, dated May 13th, as follows: "On general principles 
I am not an expansionist; but I believe that since we were, 
by an unfortunate train of circumstances, thrown into this 
thing, we should stay with it to the bitter end, and raw- 
hide these bull-headed Asiatic ruffians until they yell for 
mercy. And after the war I want the job of professor of 
American history in Luzon University, when they build it 
— and I'll warrant that the new generation of Filipinos 
will know better than to get in the way of the band wagon 
of Anglo-Saxon progress and decency." 

A powder to be shaken 
into the shoes. Your 
feet feel swollen, ner- 
vous and hot, and get tired easily If you have smarting feet or tight shoes 
try Allen's Foot-Ease. It cools the feet and makes walking easy. Cures 
swollen, sweating feet, ingrowing nails, blisters and callous spots. Re 
lleves corns and bunions of all pain, and gives rest and comfort. Try it 
to-day. Sold by all druggists and shoe stores for 25c. Trial package FREE. 
Address, Allen S. Olmsted, Le Roy, N. Y. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Savage Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Savage Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the company, room 50, Nevada 
Block, 3U9 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. on 

THURSDAY, the 20th DAY OF JULY. 1S99, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m , for the purpose of electing a Board of Trus- 
tees to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Tuesday, July 18, 1899 at 3 o'clock p. m. 

E. B HOLMES, Secretary. 
Offle: Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, S. F., Cal. 



TRY ALLEN'S FOOT-EflSE, 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblaoks, bath-houses, bll 
Hard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories 
stable men, tai-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St., S. F Tel. 5610. 



THE AWARD AT 
CHICAGO 1893. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 610 Montgomery street, S. F., deals 
lmallkindsof newspaper information, business, personal, political, from 
pressor State, Coast, and Country. Tel. Main 1048. 



Josepn Gillott's Steel Fens, 

Gold Medals, Paris, 1878-1889. These pens are "the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United States, 
Mr. Henry Hob, 91 John street, NewYork. 
Sold by all Stationers. 

G. A. MURDOGK & GO., Printers, 

No- 532 GLAY STREET, 3' F- 

THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL. Dinner.— Sunday, July 16, 1899. 

California Ovster Cocktail. 

Soup —Chicken Gumbo a la Creole; Consomme with Marrow Dumplings. 

Hors D'Oeuvres-Ce'ery en Brancne; Russian Caviar Sur Canape; Man- 
goes; California Olives 

Fish.— Boiled striped Bans, Sauce Hollandaise; Broiled LakeTahoe Trout, 
Beurre Pleurette; Sliced Cucumbers; Pommes croqueties. 

Boiled-— Turkey. Celery Sauce. 

Entrees. --Stewed Terrapin a la Maryland en Calsses; Larded Calf s 
Sweetbreads a la Constance: Spring Lamb Chops aux Petit Pois; 
Croute aux Fruits an Cognac. 

Roast--Prime Ribs of Beef au Faiford: Sugar Cured Ham, Sauce au 
Madeira: Stuffed Spring Chicken au Cresson. Punch.— Lalla Rookb. 

Vegetables.— foiled. New, Baked, and Mashed Potatoes; Baked Toma- 
toes; Corn on Cob; String Beans. Maitre d'Hotel; Boiled Rice. 

Cold Meats.— Gelatine of Capon aux Plstaches; Smoked Beef; Ham; 
Spring Lamb. 

Salads— Lettuce; Shrimp Mayonnaise; Chioory: Romaine. 

Dessert.— Cup Custard au Vanilla; Cherry Pie; Pumpkin Pie; Strawberry 
Shortcake; Tutti Prutti Ice Cream; Assorted Nuts Cluster Raisins, 
Assorted Cakes; American Cream, Edam and Roquefort Cheese; Fruit 
in Season, Smyrna Figs, Tea and Coffee. 

Dishes not on this menu can be ordered at restaurant prices. 

Dinner, 6 to 8 p. m. R. H. WARFIELD & CO., Proprietors. 



Jtilv ' *. i°99 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



j There's no disa- 
| greeable stickiness, 
j no permeatingj 
| scent, no irritation ] 
j from Wool Soap 
using— it gives the 
skin the clean fresh- 
ness of a "dip in 
purity." 

Swift and Company, Makers, Chicago 



THE DISCERNING OFFICIAL. 

THE conductor on a certain rail- 
road down South began, toward 
the end of a run, to count out the 
money received for fares during the 
trip, laying half the amount on one 
knee for himself and the other half on 
the other knee for the company. The 
only occupant of the car in which he 
carried on these calculations was an 
old gentleman who seemed to be busy 
with his newspaper. 

Finally the conductor came to the 
last dollar bill. "Well," said he, 
"shall I give this to the company or 
keep it myself? Well, I guess I'll 
toss for it, and if itco-nes down on my 
pile, all right, and if it comes down on 
the other it goes to the company." 

As it happened, it came down on his 
own pile, and he was dividing the 
money into two separate packets, 
with a self-satisfied air, when the old 
gentleman leant over and said: 

"I am the president of this road, and 
I would like to see you at my office to- 
morrow morning at ten o'clock." 
Accordingly, expecting his dismissal, 
the conductor presented himself at 
the appointed time, and said: 

"Well, here is my badge. Of 
course you don't want me any longer." 

" Hold on for a minute," said the 
president. "I don't know so much 
about that. You had better go back 
to work again. I believe you are the 
only man on the road who would have 
given the company a chance for that 
last dollar." — Life. 



It is estimated that between 

8,000,000 and 10,000,000 people in the 
United States take a vacation every 
summer. They spend between $400,- 
000,000 and $500,000,000 yearly in 
pursuit of pleasure. There are in the 
United States 23,000 summer hotels. 



"How big was the sea serpent, 

and what did he look like?" "Oh," 
answered the seaside journalist, 
dreamily, "he was about a column 
long and had a fierce looking display 
head."— N. Y. Evening World. 



THE SONG THAT REACHED HER 
HEART. 

Hieting his lady love home, 
and thinking of proposing roar- 
He had already told herthathe 
could love very devotedly, and she had 
laughingly said that his love would 
evaporate in two or three days. 
At a house a lady was singing: 
" Oh ! bi tny 1 », iii«'. 
My heart's fond pride* " 
And they passed on, and two doors 
off heard a tenor singing " Sally in 
Our Alley." Enowing how love will 
feed on music, he stopped between 
the two houses, and fondly squeezing 
the lady's arm, listened. 

"These are my sentiments," he 
whispered to her; and the lady vocalist 
finished her song with: 

" ,So be, so be niy bride." 
and the tenor went on: 
" Between a Saturday and Monday." 
The fair girl drew her arm quickly 
from her lover's clasp, and refusing 
to say good night, went home by her- 
self; and now he wonders why she 
won't speak to him. — Pick-Me-Up. 



^»^A>^**^^^^^^^*»^^^^A***«^»**^ 



A MILLION DOLLAR BEDROOM. 

HALF way between Munich and 
Salzburg is the third castle — 
Herrencbiemse«— built by Ludwig II. 
This great structure is incomplete, 
fortunately for already overtaxed 
Bavaria, for no one could surmise 
what its cost would have been. One 
room alone — the renowned bedcham- 
ber — could not be duplicated for less 
than a million dollars. The vaulted 
ceiling is one great allegorical paint- 
ing, the rounded cornice is covered 
with a score, of richly framed mural 
paintings, the walls are panels of 
hammered gold of intricate designs, 
and even the floor is of a marvelous 
pattern. The only suggestion of the 
purpose of this wonderful room is the 
sixty-thousand-dollar bed with its 
canopy more magnificent than any 
that covers a regal throne. In the 
gorgeous diqing room he had erected 
a disappearing table, which dropped 
through the floor when a course was 
finished, and in its place came up an- 
other, set and served. He desired 
this so that servan ts would be unneces- 
sary in the room and that most secret 
state matters could be discussed in 
safety. Many people sought in vain 
to see the famous room at Herren- 



Reduced Uonij 
Distance Tarll! 



Tariff M. San 
Fran<~\*co and any 
offtc* in n 

Colusa County 
Sutter County 
Yuba County 
Plaoer County 
ButtfiTounty 
Olenn County 
Nevada County 
Fresno County 
Tulare County 
Kings County 
Ventura County 
Santa Barbara Co. 
Los Angeles Co. 
Orange County 
Riverside County 
San Bernardino Co. 








5' CI: 


% 


1 


addtial 


n<it' 


minute for eat 




%» 


16 see'ds 


$.eo 


1.75 


10 see'ds 


a .60 11.00 


10 aeo'ds 


* .76 11.96 


6 aeo'ds 


tl.OO 


tl.60 


3 see'ds 



**++**++**++++++*+++++++** 



Gitu Index and Purchaser's Guide 



RESTAURANTS 
POODLE DOG Restaurant, N.E. cor. Eddy 
and Mason streets. Private dining and 
banquet rooms. Telephone 429. 

A. B. Blanco & B. Bruw 

BAY STATE Oyster House & Grill room, 
15 Stockton street and 109 O'Farrell St. 
N. M. Adler, proprietor. Tel. Main 5057 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS 
W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan St. Select- 
ions on approval ; any place in the world. 

BOILER-MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron 
Works— 314-316-318 Main St; Iron work of 
every description designed and constructed 

CASOA FERRINE BITTERS 

The world's greatest tonic, stomachic, laxa- 
tive; cures positively constipation and 
piles. Sierra Pharmaceutical Co., 1109 
Howard street, San Francisco. 

DENTISTS. 

DR. G. A. DANZIGER, Dentist, 22 Geary 
Street. San Francisco, 



chiemsee. Once an actress pleased 
Ludwig so much by her recitation 
that she thought it an opportune mo- 
ment to request permission to see his 
'most poetic bedchamber.' She was 
coolly dismissed for her effrontery, 
and the servants were ordered to 
fumigate the room in which she had 
been received. 



His Holiness Pope Leo XIII awards Cold Mmi 

In Recognition of Benefits Received from 





MARIAN) WINE TONIC 



vk)ld Meunl Presented hy His Holiness Pope 
Leo XIII to M. Angelo Mariant of. Paris. 



For Body, Brain and Nerves 

Send for Book of Endorsements and Portraits, 

Free and Postpaid. 

MARIANI S CO., 52 West 15th St., New York. 

For Sale at all Druggists Everywhere. Avoid Substitutes. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1899. 





The News Letter has es- 
tablished at its office, No. 5V4 
Kearny street, a reliable Bu- 
reau of Information, where any- 
one seeking information, routes 
of travel, attractions, prices of 
entertainment, and all other 
facts that are necessary to a 
choice of a Summer Rescrt may 
be obtained FREE. 



HIGHLAND SPRINGS 



LAKE COUNTY 

- The great sanitarium o( the west ; open etery day in the year; new hotel 
elegantly furnished; table unsurpassed; lighted by electricity; thousands 
cured by its waters. Klnest swimming tank, bowling alley and dancing 
hall in Lake oounty, together with complete livery stable, gentle saddle 
horses and ponies. q ^ ^ ^^ q{ ^^ Springg 

Physician in attendance: superb climate; beautiful mountain scenery ; 
trout deer, and small game plentiful: magnificent drives; baths in variety; 
lawn tennis and croquet; reached by the shortest stage route into Lake 
oounty; round-trip fare from San Franoisoo, via Hopland, $8; via calis- 
toga, $o. ^^^ ^^ Cottage Rates. $10 to $14 per week 

Take S. F & N. P Railway to Hopland, or S. P. R. R. to Calistoga. 

For illustrated pamphlet or further information ■■ ddress J. CKAXG, 
Highland Springs, Lake county. Cal.; or see L. D. CRAIG. 316 Montgomery 
street Highland Springs mineral waters on sale at Oakland Pioneer 
Soda water Co., Thirteenth and Webster streetB, Oakland; Ahrens, Pein 
&Bullwinkel. 620 Post street S.F. 

HOWARD SPRINGS SmidsTth^Tne^forests 
of Lake Co.— the Switzerland of America. 
Elevation 2800 feet; no fog; climate per- 
fect. Natural hot mineral plunge and tub 
baths, fine medicinal drinking water. Ex- 
cellent fishing and hunting. Postoffloe and 
telephone on premises. Rates $8, f 10 and 
$12 with special terms for families. Ac- 
commodations, table and service first class. 
Round tiip from San Francisco via Napa, 
Calistoga, $10, Including fine stage drive. 

For accommodations and further par- 
ticulars address 

MRS. R. J. BEEBY, proprietor, Putah P.O. 



HOTEL BE^V/ENUE AND COTTAGES 

LAKEPou. CAL 
Lakeport's LeadiDg Suniu.;.- Resort. 
Situated overlooking the shore on Clear Lake. 
Elegant new pavilion. Boat house and Bowl 
ing Alley. Special facilities for accommo- 
dating families with children; home cooking; 
boating, bathing, hunting, and superior fish- 
ing; no Chinese employed. 

Open all the year 
FRANK &A. M. SCALES, Proprietors 






BLUE LAKES HOTEL 

Will be conducted in a quiet, home-like 
manner, with one of the best tables in the 
county; Rates $10 to $12. Round trip $9.50. 
S. F. & N. P. to Ukiah; thence by stage from 
Palace Hotel. Address 



JOHN WILSON, 



Bertha, Lake county, Cal. 



SAMUEL SODA SPRINGS. 

Sure cure for dyspepsia, indigestion, rheumatism, and constipation. 
Hot mineral baths. These springs are located in Napa CouDty, twenty 
miles east of St. Helena. The water Is bottled at the springs, and contains 
its own natural gas, Stage leaves St. Helena. 



R. MORRIS, Proprietor, 

Napa County, Cal. 



GARLSBAD ' The most beautiful spot in Lake County 

The mineral springs are well known for marvelous cures when every- 
thing else fails, especially in cases of stomach, liver, kidney and bladder 
affections. Good bathing; superior accommodations 110 per week; hotel 
lighted with gas ; good trout fishing and deer hunting on property. 



For particulars wriie 



W. R, McGOVERN, Carlsbad, Lake County 



SEIGLER SPRINGS UKE county, cal, 




This delightful watering place is located 
in the midst of the Coast Range. 

Abundance of Mineral Springs 
Hot and cold plunge baths, large swim- 
ming tank of mineral water, fine stone 
dining room ; telephone connections ; 
electric lights, livery accommodation; 
good trout fishing and hunting. Round 
trip tickets at Southern Pacific offices, 
$10. 

JOHN SPAULDING, Proprietor. 



BONANZA SPRINGS 



LAKE COUNTY, CAL A 

natural camping ground; five 
different mineral and two pure 
wate .prings. We cater to campers only. Fishing and hunting; cottages 
to re ;, $1.50 up per week; pure water piped to each cottage. Hot and cold 
mineral baths; all necessities can be purchased on the grounds; ham- 
mocks, swings, and croquet; summer houses in shady groves. One mile 
north of Howard Sprit gs Post and Money Order Office— daily mail Ad- 
dress, R. F. DOCKERY, Prop., Putah P. O., Lake County, Cal., or S. F. 
News Letter Bureau, 5!4 Kearny St. 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Only natural mineral steam baths in Lake Co. 

Hot sulphur and Iron Baths. Board $8 to $14 
per week; baths free. Address 

J. ANDERSON, 
Anderson Springs. Mlddletown, Lake oounty. 
Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return, $8. 
Send for circular. 

as- Full particulars at S. F. News Letter. 5'i Kearny street, S. F. 





GLEN BROOK Lake county 

Remember— If you want to hunt; if you want to 
fish; If you want to recuperate; if you want the 
best of recreation; If you want pure air and sun- 
shine ; if you want to enjoy an exhilarating climate 

Come to Glenbrook 

0. W. R. TREDWAY, proprietor Glenbrook Hotel 



SKAGGS HOT SPRINGS Sonoma county 

Only 4% hours from San Francisco and but 9 miles staging. Waters 
noted for medicinal virtues, best natural bath in State; swimming and 
boating; grand mountain scenery; good trout streams at door. 

First-Class Hotel and Stage Service. 

p. m. Terms $2 a day or $13 



Take Tiburon Ferry at 7:30 a. m. or 3 
a week. 




J. F. Mulgrew, Proprietor. 

AGUA CALIENTE 
SPRINGS HOTEL 

Sonoma Valley, two hours from 
San Francisco via Tiburon ferry. 

Warm mineral swimming and tub 
baths. Water, gas, electric bells. 

$iu to $12 per week, $2 per day. 

Address 

AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 
Agua Ca liente, Sonoma co 



Before going on your vacation drop a postal to 

HOBERG'S 

For fall particulars. LAKE OOUNTY, CAL. 

Short drive to any ot the famous mineral 
springs of Lake County. 



Mention this paper. 



$7 and $8 per weeK 




THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM 

Thoroughly Equipped with all modern appliances for the relief of 
suffering humanity, all forms Water Treatment, the finest Static Gal- 
vanic Sinusoidal and Faradic Electrical apperatus, A Corps of well 
trained nuhses of both sexes, skilled in all forms of treatments and 
manipulations, Rest Cure scientifically carried out. The iurkst and 
best of foods manufactured and for sale. * * * A quiet, home like 
place, beautiful scenery, Mount Hamilton and the famous Lick Obser- 
vatory in plain view; one blook from electric oars, fifteen minutes walk 
from the center of the city. Terms $8 to $20 per week, including medical 
attention and regular treatment. 

Garden City Sanitarium, EAST SAN JOSF Vt> 



July 15. 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LBTTKR 



11 



Paso RoDles Soda Sprino. 



Pfc»o Robles Soda— fresh from bub 
bHDK enVrvcm-tog spring— coming 
up from Nature's drug store, com- 
pounded and charged to cure the sick. 

This sparkling beverage Is served at 
the table— drink nil you want of It. 
tn edge on your appetite, aids 
digestion and promotes nutrition 

OTTO K NEVER, Proprietor, 

Paso Robles, Cal 
City office, 696 Market street. 





PARA 180 MOT 

SPRINGS 

MONTEREY CO., CAL. 

The Carlsbad of America. For health, rest, 
pleasure, climate, accommodations, scenery, 
flower beds, cleanliness, table, hot soda and sulphur 
tub and plunge baths, massage treatment, special bath-houses for ladies 
and lady attendant, hunting and fishing, children's playground, croquet, 
lawn tennis, and danoe hall. Grounds and cottages lighted by gas. For 
families, Paraiso stands unsurpassed in the State; plenty of enjoyment 
for young and old. Take train Third and Townsend streets, San Francisco, 
Qa m., and at Oakland from First and Broadway at 9:10 a. m. dally for' 
Sbledad. Return-trip tickets $8. at S. P. office, 6'3 Market street; seven 
mib*s by stage. Telephone and postofflce. For illustrated pamphlets and 
further information address, J. PERRATJLT. M. D., Proprietor and Resi- 
dent Physician. 



BLITHEDALE 




AT THE FOOT OF MT. TAMALPAIS, 

MILL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 

Within an hour of San Franci- co. 
Grounds comprise 160 acres 
Supplied with mountain spring water. 
Lighted by electricity. 
Golf links and tennis court. 
'Bus meets all trains. 

J. A. ROBINSON, LESSEE. 

Telephone ' BTithedale." 



HOTEL MATEO and Cottages, San Mateo 



Cuisine Unsurpassed 
Climate Delightful 
Grounds Beautiful 



W- G. GRAHAM, Proprietor 



HOTEL BELVEDERE 






OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 



A superb resort, 

Francisco. 

Modern new hotel and cottages. 

Perfect service. 



minutes from San 



Mrs. A. T. Mooke 
Belvedere 



HOTEL d< 



REDWOOD 

SANTA CRUZ 



MOUNTAINS 



One of the most beautiful spots in the heart of the Redwoods. 
Pine water, mineral springs, beautiful views, walks and drives. 
Altitude 1600 feet. Rates. $8 and 810 per week. Round' trip from San 
Francisco to Laurel Station, Narrow Gauge, 13.50 
Write for particulars. 

M. S. COX, Proprietor 



HOTEL EL MONTE 



Los Gatos, Cal 



Santa Cruz Mountains 

Delightful climate; lovely drives; all large sunny rooms ; striotly first 
olass; new management. Amerioan plan. 

JOHN NEVILL, proprietor. 



Strictly First-Class 

All Modern Improvements 

Electric Lights 

Liberal Rates 



■Hotel Lyndon 

Los Gatos, Cal. 



LYMAN 
Proprietor. 



H. TOLFREE, 



CYPRESS 



VILLA 
NOW OPEN 

B Street San Rafael, near Narrow Gauge 

This favorite resort has been Dewly turoished 
and has undergone an eodre renovm ion. For 
families, tourists, and the public generally, 
the accommodations are unexcelled Board 
by day. week, or month. New management. 




W. F. Warburton. Proprietor. 




The Discoverer of Rubicon Springs. 



RUBICON 
SODA SPRINGS 

On Rubicon River, in miles from 
McKInney's. LAKE TAHOE. 

Primitive, clean home cooking. 
New management; new furnishing; 
new stages; GOOD HUNTING; flneflsn- 
ing and boating on river and lakes; 
thp drive to the springs is the most 
picturesque -lorest drive in Califor- 
nia. These springs are noted for 
medicinal*. value in stomach, liver, 
and kiiney troubles and relief for 
' obesity. 
Rates.,810.50 lo $12 a week. $2 a day. 
D. ABBOTT. MRS. T. B. SMITH, 
Manager. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

A quiet home, oentxally located, lor 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

Jl/m. B. Hooper, Manager. San Francisco 

HOTEL BARTtfOUDl, 

THE very center of the olty, convenient to 
all the big stores and all places of amusement. 
European Plah, $1.00 a day upwards. 
23d Street and Broadway, New York, 

(Opposite Madison Square Park). Reed & Roblee, Mgrs. 



HOTEL BELLA VISTA 



A First-class Hotel 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer Pirst-class 
Familjr Hotel of San Francisco. All the 
comforts of a modern residence. 



1001 Pin« street 



MRS. DENVER, Proprietor 



Tents 

5 FLAG 

Camp Furniture, 

AMES&HARRIS,lnc 




loo Sacram?i7to~5r. 
San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1899. 



oeiEr/- 




fE are in the full en- 
joymedt of our usu- 
ual July weather, and for 
the greater part of the 
week the sun has been 
an unknown quantity in 
San Francisco. However, it is not San Francisco alone 
that can complain in that respect, and over in Marin 
county especially it has been cold and disagreeable nearly 
all summer so far. To a good many people the summer 
seems to end with the Fourth of July, and many who make 
that date the limit of their stay in the country are now 
returning to town, so that one sees familiar faces once 
more in the streets; the legal fraternity, too, who have 
been off fishing, shooting, and otherwise enjoying them- 



esses is Mrs. Collier, who is never so happy as when her 
house is full of congenial friends. Quite a number were 
assembled beneath her roof tree during the recent conse- 
cration services of the little church at Lakeport, of which 
she is organist and her daughter Sarah one of the choir. 
Mrs. Salisbury and her daughters have also been recent 
guests at her hospitable board. 

There was a pretty wedding at St. Mary's Cathedral 
last Saturday evening, when the Reverend Father Mc- 
Sweeney united in marriage Miss Mabel Valleau and Syd- 
ney N. Starr. Green and white were the tints used in 
decorating the chancel and altar, and, shining amid the 
flowers, the light of innumerable candles threw brilliancy 
upon the scene. The bride, who was attended by Miss 
Georgie Davis as maid of honor, and the Misses Anita 
Galloway, May Costigan, Genevieve Galloway, and May 
Magner as bridesmaids, wore a robe of white Duchesse 
satin trimmed with chiffon, a tulle veil, and a spray of 
orange blossoms in her hair, and was given away by her 
uncle, Andrew Valleau. Her attendants were all gowned 
alike in white organdie over white silk. Following the 
ceremony there was a banquet at the California Hotel for 
the bridal party and relatives only. The honeymoon is be- 
ing spent in Southern California. 

Next Tuesday will take place in Berkeley the wedding 
of Miss O. R. Spohr and V. K. Chesnut; and next Wed- 
nesday Miss Alice Ames and Thomas H. Robbins will be 




The Cascades, MiU Valley. 

selves in the country, are also beginning to be in evidence 
again; but, for all that, entertainments in town are for 
the present practically nil, and one hears of dinners and 
luncheons being given all over the country from Monterey 
to Clear Lake, and, now that the moonlight is at hand, 
straw rides and dances will no doubt be added to the list. 
In San Mateo county and in San Rafael these gatherings 
are exceedingly plentiful, while up in Lake county one of 
the most untiring, and at the same time charming, host- 



wedded at Grace Church. Recent engagement announce- 
ments are those of Miss Nellie Mayer of Pacific Avenue 
and Julius Strauss of Yokohama; of Miss Lou Holcolmb to 
Lieutenant John O'Shea, U. S. A.; of Miss Alice Beatty 
to Brooke Wright; of Miss Sarah Onyon of Gilroy to Henry 
Miller, Jr., son of the cattle king; and from Honolulu comes 
the news of the engagement of Mrs. Alice Hastings and 
Dr. Carmichael of the U. S. Marine Hospital Corps. 
Burlingame will be comparatively deserted to-day for 



July 15. 1899. 



SAN PRANCKCO NEWS LETTER. 



»3 



the races which will take place at the Hobart Farm Track. 
There are to be seven events, and the prizes promise to 
be well contested for. Admission will be free, and 1 
body invited. The first race will be a quarter-mile dash 
for qualified polo ponies that have never won a race, and 
the prize will be the Hobart C.ip, to go to the winning 
rider. The second race will be a match race between Mr 
Carolan's thoroughbred horse Yucatan and Mr. Hobart's 
pony Comanche. The distance will be one quarter of a 
mile. The third race, which will be the feature of the 
dav, will be for the J. J. Moore silver loving cup, value 
I860. It is for qualified hunters, that have hunted at lea§t 
twice this year with the San Mateo hounds; distance two 
and a half miles, over ten jumps; the second prize in this 
race will be a cup offered by the San Mateo Hunt Club, 
which will go to the jockey on the second horse. The 
fourth race will be for the Eyre Cup; distance one-half 
mile for qualified polo ponies that have never won a race. 
The fifth race will be a pony hurdle, distance one mile and 
a quarter, for the Carolan Cup. The sixth race will be a 
mile on the flat for a cup offered by Mr. Hume. The 
seventh race will be a match race between Mr. Hobart's 
Guzeba and Mr. Carolan's Pinto for $50 a side, each to 
ride the other's horse. Money to winning jockey. 

The departure of Mr. and Mrs. Antoine Borel and their 
large family of daughters will close one of the most hospit- 
able houses in San Francisco, as they intend to make a 
long sojourn in their recently acquired chateau in Switzer- 
land. They were to have left us last year, but the serious 
illness of Mrs. Borel necessitated a change in their plans 
which has been society's gain, and they will be made wel- 
come when they return, which may possibly not be for a 
couple of years. Mr. Borel was the" recipient of a grand 
farewell banquet at the hands of a hundred of his fellow 
citizens which was given at Delmonico's on Thursday even- 
ing of last week. 

CaptaiQ E. H. Plummer, who has been such a social 
favorite during his stay in San Francisco while on General 
Shatter's staff, is the recipient of hearty congratulations 
on his recent promotion to be Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
Thirty-Fifth Infantry. Pleasure at his good luck has been 
mingled with regret that his gain will result in loss to his 
friends in this city, as the Regiment will, as soon as or- 
ganized, depart for the Philippines. 

The arrivals at Del Monte are increasing in number 
every day and nearly all those from San Francisco who 
intend making that delightful hostelry their headquarters 
this summer are now established therein. Among recent 
arrivals are Miss Jenny Flood, Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey 
Winslow, E. R. Folger, Mr. and Mrs. Haas, Lansing 
Kellogg, Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Worden, John Twiggs, 
Hermann Oelrichs, the Misses Emily and Ethel Hager, 
the Misses Fanny and Josephine Loughborough, Mrs. 
Adam Grant, Fred Webster, Mr.- and Mrs. Rudolph 
Spreckels and Miss Jolliffe, Mrs. A. Roos and others. 
Mr. and Mrs. Casey and Miss Dillon will go there upon 
their return from Lake Tahoe. 

Alex Rutherford has been visiting his mother at Castle 
Crag since his return from Japan. Among others in that 
delightful pine clad region are Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Green- 
wood, and Miss Ethel Kellogg. Mrs. George Crocker is 
the life of the place and each week has a fresh relay of 
guests from town and Sacramento to help in making time 
pass pleasantly with rides, drives, walks, etc. For those 
who desire a free and healthful outing Castle Crag cer- 
tainly offers every possible inducement. 

Mrs. F. B. Edgerton, who returned last week after a 
long absence in Europe and the East, is visiting her old 
home in Napa Valley, where she is the guest of her vener- 
able parents, Mr. and Mrs. Smith Brown. Mrs. George 
Loomis is spending July at Adams Springs, Lake County; 
Sig. Steinhart, who arrived from New York last week, is 
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Ignatz Steinhart at their San 
Rafael Villa; Mrs. W. B. Hooper, Mrs. J. D. Brown, Mr. 
and Mrs. B. B. Wilson and Miss Wilson are at the Hotel 
Rowardennan; Mr. and Mrs. Walter Newhall, Mrs. O. C. 
Pratt, the Misses O'Connor, and Ed. Peixotto are among 
those at Coronado. General and Miss Wheeler are due 
here to-day en route to Manila. Mr. and Mrs. Horace 
Hill are at Lake Tahoe. 

IF you don't drink Jackson's Napa Soda you don't know what's good. 



A. K. Wliittun, who was recently made Colonel of the 
Fifth Infantry State Guards, Ik. 1 his promotion 

u the result of merit. E^e enter -ivate 

in 1"2, the following (ear became captain, and in 18H0 was 
promoted to be major. The election of colonel is deserv- 
edly popular. 

Commencement exercises of the Dental and Pharmaceu- 
tical departments of the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, were held at the California Theatre last Wednesday 
evening at 8 o'clock, Professor J. R. Laine, presiding. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank P. Wilson, of 1101 Van Ness avenue, 
are at Hotel Belvedere. 

The annual meeting of the San Rafael Hunt Club took 
place on the 6th inst. at San Rafael, and the following 
officers were elected directors: Dr. H. O. Howard, Baron 
von Schroeder, F. H. Green, J. J. Crooks, and Leon Boc- 
queraz; Mr. Crooks, judge. The first chase of the season 
will take place this afternoon. 

Dr. Simmons and family, from Sacramento, are at Ho- 
tel Belvedere. 

The most delicious coffee, rolls, and cake, moderate 

prices, at Roemer's Original Vienna Caf6, 205 Kearny St. 

T hehk are lots of " AA" brands of whisky, but onlr one Jesse Moore "AA • 

f-^R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Motb 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and denes cfce- 
tection. It has stood the testof 50 years 
and is so harmless we taste It to be sure 
It is properly made. Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A. Sayoe 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient) : "As you ladles will use them. 1 
recommend ' Gouraud's Cream ' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe 

FERO. T. HOPKINS. Pron'r. 
Hy Great Jones St.. N. V 




BEAMISH 

HAS REMOVED to 
209 Montgomery St. 

Directly Opposite Entrance Mills Building 
Established 30 Years. 



ROBERTS' 



Wholesale and Retail. 



Cor. Bush and Polk its. 

Fine Candies 

Telephone, East 521. 



F. C 




F. C. corset s y I 

Both Stylish and | 

Elegant. : : : ». 

Made of fine materials, bold by leading stores jj£ 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1899. 




The bright boy's mother is cultivating his bump of ob- 
servation. "Now, Johnny," holding up a picture card, 
"shut your eyes and tell me what you saw on this card." 
"A cow, a barn, a horse," rattled off the bright boy, 
glibly. "What else?" "Nothing." "Oh, yes! Think, 
now. What did you see behind the cow?" referring to the 
trees in the background. A moment's reflection. "Her 
tail!" shouted Johnny, ecstatically. 

Ho had come upon her dozing in her hammock, and 
when she woke up she accused him of stealing a kiss. 
"Well," he said, "I will admit that the temptation was 
too strong to be resisted. I did steal one little kiss." 
"One!" she exclaimed, indignantly; "I counted eight be- 
fore I woke up." 

Fathor (to son from whom he has just accepted a cigar) 
— Excellent! How much did you pay? Son — They're 
three for a quarter. "Great Scott! And I content my- 
self with two for a nickel." "That's a different matter. 
If I had as large a family as you to support I shouldn't 
smoke at all." — Life. 

"I don't believe you ever did a stroke of work in your 
life." Tired Treadwell — Mum, you wrong me. I used 
to be one of them somnamberlists, and when I was walking 
in my sleep one time, I carried a bucketful of coal nearly 
forty feet before I awoke. 

Old Gentleman (dictating an indignant letter) — Sir, my 
stenographer, being a lady, cannot take down what I 
think of you. I, being a gentleman, cannot think it; but 
you, being neither, can easily guess my thoughts. 

Hoitess — Dear me, the conversation is flagging. What 
can we do to amuse our guests? Host — I don't know, un- 
less we leave the drawing-room for a few minutes and give 
them a chance to talk about us. 

"Come and dine with us to-morrow," said the gentleman 
who had made money. "Sorry," returned the other, "I 
can't. I'm going to see Hamlet." "That's all right. 
Bring him with you." 

Husband — What! Another hundred dollar gown. Didn't 
I tell you that you must keep within your allowance? 
Wife (triumphantly) — You said in case of absolute 
necessity! 

"I never in my life permitted a man to kiss me," said the 
blonde. "Of course not," returned the brunette. "I don't 
think much of a man who waits to be permitted, either." 

"Before a man is thirty he falls in love with every pretty 
girl he looks at." "Yes?" "And after he is thirty he 
falls in love with every pretty girl who looks at him." 

Mrs. Henry Pock — First we get horseless carriages and 
then wireless telegraphy. I wonder what next? Her 
Husband (meekly) — Wifeless matrimony, perhaps. 

He — I knew you would make a fuss if I tried to kiss you. 
She — How did you know? He — I had been warned. — 
Detroit Free Press. 

Coroner — Were there any marks about the deceased by 
which you would be able to identify him? Witness — Yis, 
sor. He stuttered. 

Lewltt — I don't see you with that pretty girl so often as 
I used to. Jewitt — No, I'm married to her now. 



BANKING. 



J. M. Litchfield & Co., 10 Post street, make tbe finest and most 
stylish suits in the city. Especially correct are their military suits. 
The best quality of goods and richest materials only used. In fit, 
finish, and appearance the suits made by Litpbfield & Co. are always 
swell. 

Every day from 11 until 2 a fine merchant's luncheon is spread at 
the Grand Hotel Cafe\ Fay & Foster, proprietors. The cafe has 
been recently completely renovated and the best service and 
luncheons to be had in the city are provided. 

When your head aches just ready to burst, that's where Jackson's Napa 
Soda comes to. 



Bank of British Columbia. { &&?&*£ R^i%:^.ffi 

Capital Paid Up ... $3,000,000 Reserve Fund 1 500,000 

BEAD OFFICE. 60 Lombard Street, London 

B ranches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloope, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson Rosslaad, Sandon, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at ourrent rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows : 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada ; Chicago— First Na tionalBank ; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland — Bank of 'Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company oi 
Sydney, Ld; Demeraha and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon District, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue 
drafts and Letters of Credit on that Bank at above point, and transact 
other banking business. Terms upon application. 

The flnglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 16,000,000 

Subscribed 8,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cob. Pink and Sansohe Sis 
Head Oftiob— 18 Austin Friars. London, E. O. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART 1 M -.„-. ro 

P. N. LILIENTHAL | M*n a B" a 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 
Jas. K Wilson, President. E. A. Bruguierb, Vice-President. 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital $500,000 

Directors : Jas. K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm . Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope, E . A. Bruguiere, John Barton, C. £. Benedlot. 

Agents: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & 
Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

33 POST Street, below Kearny, Mecbanics' Institute Building 

Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Pald-Up Capital ( 300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President 

C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, O. Q 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co. , or Ezohang 
on City Banks, Whenopenlng aocountssend signature. 

Securitu Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 
LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L. Aboot Jr. B.B.Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin E. J. MoCutohei 

Adam Grant W.S.Jones R. H. Pease 

Continental Building & Loan Association of California. 

Established in 1889. 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital, 18,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund 1175,000 

Paid-in Capital 1,300,000 Monthly Income, over - - 75,000 

Dr. Ed. E Hill, President. capt. Oliver Eldridqe, Vice-President 
Wm. Cobbih Secretary and General Manager. 

Crocker- Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Cob. Market, Montgomery, and Post streets. 

Pald-Up Capital »i,000,000 

WM. H.CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

W. GREGG Jb Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E. Brown, C. E. Green, G. W. 
Kline. Hy. J. Crooker, G. W. Scott. 

Germania Trust Go. of San Francisco f t %T§°™ ry 

Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, $375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 
Check Accounts of Individuals, Firms, and Corporations solicited. ' 

legal Dei ository for money In Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
Paid on Trust Deposits and Savings. Investments oarefully seleoted 
for our clients 

Board of Directors— Ernst A. Denicke. F. Kronenberg, J. C. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro, F. C. Siebe, Albert G. Wieland, H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H 
Brunner, 

Officers— Ernst A. Denioke, 'President, F. Kronenberg, Vioe-p esfdeni 
H. Brunner, Cashier. 



July 15 1899. 



SAX FRANCISCO NKW8 LETTER. 



*5 




THE OPEN WINDOW -non ''Hctmionc, ahoothch «>£»» ' 

KOWLAHD SILL- fUatlSHiOBX HOUGH TOS- HIFfun A CO' 



M 



Y tower was grimly builded, 
With many a bolt ami bar, 
1 And here," I thought, "I will keep my life 
From ihe bitter world afar." 

l'ark and chill was the stony Moor, 

Where never a sunbeam lay, 
And the mould crept up the dreary wall, 

With its ghost touch, day by day. 

One morn, in my sullen musings, 

A flutter and cry I heard ; 
And close at the rusty casement 

There clung a frightened bird. 
Then back I Hung the shutter 

That was never before undone, 
And I kept till its wings were rested 

The little weary one. 

But in through the open window, 

Which 1 bad forgot to close, 
There had burst a gush of sunshine 

And a summer scent of rose. 

For all the while I had burrowed 

There in my dingy tower. 
Lot the birds had sung and the leaves bad danced 

From hour to sunny hour. 

And such a balm and warmth and beauty 

Came drifting in since then, 
That the window still stands open 

And shall never be shut again. 



SONG OF SPRING-— ella woodward foote 



Here in my hand 
A spray of pink arbutus bloom, 
Its fragrance fills the sunny room; " 

Once more I stand, 
Love, by your side, and watch the slow 
And sweet unfolding of the Spring— 
The misty clouds that come and go, 

The birds that sing! 

Why is it, Dear, 
That every whispering southern breeze, 
Each lengthening shadow of the trees, 

Brings you so near ? 

Sweetheart, we two 
Could never have it otherwise. 
It is not loss when all the skies 

Bring news of you ; 

When every pattering April shower 
Brings thought or memory to me, 
A tiny pink arbutus flower 

Brings tears, you see- 

And yet I know 
I would not spare one smallest thing 
For these long heartaches that they bring — 

i love you so! 



FROM THE AGE OF GOLD — Arthur j stringer, in the bookman. 

Enthralled within Ihe sculptured stone she slept, 

Till one strange kiss some unknown barrier broke; 
Then through the marble bosom warmed and crept 
Life's wine — and lo! the woke. 

Such was the legend, Dearest, once they dreamed, 

Long, long ago, in their lost Age of Gold, 
When wiser, sweeter, truer than they seemed, 
The childish tales they told I 

For was not I, who slept and knew it not, 

Ah, was not I, who dreamed my whole life through, 
When my dumb lips your saddened lips first sought, 
Awakened thus by you? 



MMMMMMUM 

GRAY BROS., 



ftMMIM 



2« Montgomery St., S. P 

806 Now High St.. Los Angoles 



C oncrete a nd . „ 
flrtlllGlal Stone Work. 



CITY STREET I/1PROVEMENT CO., 

FIFTH FLOOR MILLS BUILDING. S. F. 



Proprietors 

Bitumen nines. 

Santa Cruz and King City, 
Monterey County, Cal 



Contractors for all kinds 
of street work, bridges, 
and railway construc- 
tion, wharves, jetties 
and seawalls. 



BANKING. 



Bank of California, San Francisco. 

Capital, 13,000,000 Surplus, tl, 000,000 

Profit and Loss Account. January 1, 1899, $2,159,928 

WILLIAM ALVORD.. ..President I CHARLES R. BISHOP.. Vlce-Pres'l 

ALLENM.CLAY Seoretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smitb... Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Modi/ton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co. ; the Bank of New York.N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— National Shaw- 
mut Bank; Chioaoo— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California 
London— Messrs. N. M.Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres. Berlin— Direction der Dlsconto Qesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit Issued available In all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

532 California Street. 

Deposits July I, 1890 $24,920,395 Reserve Fund $305 sis 

Paid-Up Capital 1,0U0,U00 Contingent Fund 442,763 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. R. M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors: George W. Beaver, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, Al- 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin. Georee 
Tasheira, E. B. Pond. * 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms and 
Farming Lands in the Country. 

Receives Deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
in San Franoisio, Post Office or Wells Fargo & Co.'s, Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
reoeipt cf the money. 

No charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 3 p. m , and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco 

Guarantee capital and surplus $2 187,6.7.00 

Capital actually paid up in oash.. 1.000 000 on 

Deposits June 30, 1891) 27,656,513 03 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-Presi- 
dent, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A H. 
R.Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Seoretary, George 
Tourny: Assistant Secretary, A. H, Muller; General Attorney, W. S 
Goodfellow. 

Ign. Steinhart, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. Walter, N. Ohlanc't 
and John Lloyd. 

Wells Fargo & Go. Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansomb & Suttbr Streets 

John J. Valentine Presiden i 

Homer S. King Managet 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

H. L. Miller 3d Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6.26U.uw> 

BRANCHES. 

N.Y. Clty.H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Luke City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or.. R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, John 

Be rmlngham. Dudley Evans. ^^^ 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.w. Cor. sansomb & Sdtter Sts 

Subscribed Capital 82,500,000 

Paid Up Capital 92,000,000 

Reserve Fund s 850,000 

Head Office 40 Threadneedle Street, London, E. c 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Frerei 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBATTM 1 MlM „„ 
C. ALTSCBTJL J ««»«««. 



26 



SAK FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1899. 



HEARST'S CHICAGO PAPER. 



EVER since Willie Hearst made his entry into tbe jour- 
nalistic world in New York, there have been stories 
floating about of his intended invasion of the Chicago field. 
It has been known that he has a franchise for the Windy 
City, and in the minds of newspaper people there has been 
no question that sooner or later the Hearst methods and 
millions would awaken spasms of fear in newspaperdom of 
Chicago, and give residents of the Windy City a personal 
illustration of how yellow journalism is to be made. Whether 
in the morning or evening field has not yet been deter- 
mined by the quid nuncs, but there can be little doubt a 
morning paper wiil be Hearst's choice. With the Journal 
here, the Examiner in San Francisco, and a third exponent 
of the Simon-Pure democracy half way across the conti- 
nent, the name of Hearst would become a prominent factor 
in national politics; and Willie's meteoric flight in the 
strenuous life of a successful newspaper publisher con- 
tinued. 

Whether he will buy a plant on its last legs, as in the 
case of the Journal, cannot be determined. Having a 
franchise now he will be under no obligation of buying a 
paper to get one; and it is not likely that there are any 
proprietors in Chicago anxious to sell — although there are 
several of them not making money. The Hearst venture 
will, it is understood, be launched this fall, so that a firm 
footing may be obtained before the National Democratic 
Convention assembles and the struggle for the Presidency 
in 1900 is on. 

Speaking of Hearst reminds me that the Journal is 
likely to figure in a libel suit soon, if not as defendant, at 
least in an unenviable light. Belmont owns a large num- 
ber of racing horses, and through a sale of one of tbem fell 
foul of a former outlaw-sportsman — one Steve 1/ Homme- 
dieu. In referring to the matter the Journal, which stands 
by the professional gamblers of the track, roasted Mr. 
Belmont to a very brown turn. The next evening Belmont 
met Hearst at a club, and informed the editor hotly 
that he would begin suit at once, Some very interesting 
and pi obably crooked inside history will be brought out if 
the matter gets into court. 

* * * 

Morality is like lightning: no one can foretell where it will 
strike; but one would never guess that it would choose a 
New York (of course this does not apply to the Pacific 
Coast) summer resort. Everyone East and a whole lot 
of you Californians know the Larchmont Yacht Club. 
Its members are gay young bucks who know a good thing 
when they see it; and Larchmont-on-the-Souud, which 
several seasons ago was the twittering home of peroxide 
ladies, cosy and coquettish rose-embowered villas presided 
over many by a rare and brilliantly-tinted mistress from the 
four winds of gentle heaven. The music of stringed instru- 
ments mixed and mingled with the popping of corks, and 
natty nautical gentlemen sauntered through the golden 
evening shadows armed with cold bottled offerings to 
Bacchus and to Venus. 

Champagne suppers were as oommon as pretty girls in 
San Francisco; and all manner of strange and frisky 
devices jollied the hours along. Brigades of bicyclists 
arrayed in ball dresses flitted along the avenues at mid- 
Dight, and impromptu baths enjoyed by the care free 
crowds gowned in nothing more substantial than the light 
of the shimmering silvery moon were frequent. 

All this is changed. This year the season opened with an 
icy regard for the proprieties. Two of the hotels, known in 
the old days as "Soubrette Row" and "Koster and Bial's," 
have been rechristened "The Morgue" and the "Old 
Ladies' Home." The hostelry which won the most un- 
enviable fame is now distinguished by a throng of elderly 
ladies with maids and dogs, who sun themselves on the 
piazza while the orchestra plays dirges in the vacant 
parlors. No voice is raised above a whisper and no- laugh 
louder than a cackle disturbs the solemnity of the season. 
Under these conditions the merry men of the Larchmont 
Yacht Club have been driven to desperation and to drink I 
Sa long drawn out are the evenings at the club that noon 
of the next day is the time consecrated to retiring, es- 
pecially after the Saturday and Sunday night sessions, 
when the "Alcohol Club" and the "Highbinders' Associa- 
tion," two of the inner circles of the club, are represented. 



Hotel piazzas that once gleamed with white duck trousers 
and gold lettered caps now hold hen conventions until 10 
p. m., when the shutters are closed and the inmates climb 
feebly to their rooms, followed by their faithful dogs and 
maids. The wave of morality that spread over Larchmont 
after its fall from grace has engulfed it, and the summer 
girl sits on the rocks and weeps for the days gone by. 
New York, July 10, 1899. Passe-Partout. 

Don't suffer with dyspepsia Baldwin's Dyspepsia Capsules, with 
Baldwin's Health Tablets, will cure. Ferry Drug Store, 8 Market street. 



You never have a "head" in the morning from drinking Jesse Moore 
"AA" Whiskey. 

Jackson's Napa Soda never tires. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of Works— Virginia District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 30th day of June, 1899, an assessment, No. 67, of 10 oents per 
share, was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately In United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 33, Nevada Block 309 Montgomery St,, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
4th DAY OF AUGUST, 1899, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Friday, the 25th day of August, 
1899, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors 

M. JAFFE. Secretary. 

Office— Room 81, Nevada Block 39 Montgomery St. , San Francis co, Cal . 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Justice Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca 
tion of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 6th day of July, 1899, an assessment No. 65, of Ten cents (10c) 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 40, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco. California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on tbe 
8th DAY OF AUGUST, 1899, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Tuesday, the 29th day of August, 
1899, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertis- 
ing and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. K. KELLY. Secretary. 

Office— Room 40, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St, San Francisoo, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Alpha Con. Mill and Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 22 

Amount per Share 3 cents 

Levied July 12, 1889 

Delinquent in office August 16. 1899 

Day of sale of Delinquent Stock September 7. 1899 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Seoretary. 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Blook, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Caj . 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Ophlr Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 75 

Amount per Share 15 oents 

Levied July6,1899 

Delinquent In Office August 8, 1899 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 28, 1899 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Offloe—Room 50, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curry Stiver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 86 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied May 2, 1899 

Delinquent in office July 6, 1899 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stook July 27,1899 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Seoretary. 
Office — Room 69, Nevada Blook, 3n9 Montgomery streets, San Fran 
oisoo, Cal. 

Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

HOME INSURANCE CO. OF NEW YORK SMKo 

H. L. Roff, General Agent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well organized, competent, and experienced force of Gen 
bral and Special Agents resident in the Paolfio Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the in- 
•■Using public, and immediate Attention to the Adjustment and PAY- 
MEN T OF LOSBEB. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up tl.000.ooo 

Total Assets . 8 702.300 

Surplus to Polioy Holders 2,112,546 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 

COLIN M. BOYD. UrfflSSSStSSfe 



July 15, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER. 



*7 



INSURANCE. 



Tile Supreme Court has been heard from in the 
-souri Anti-Trust proceedings. The Court declares 
nderwriters' Social Club of St. Joseph "a pool, trust 
and conspiracy, organized and maintained as an unlawful 
combination, and a writ of ouster against each of the com- 
panies sued has been granted. Commissioner Orear took 
immediate action, and revoked the licenses of the following 
companies : 

Firemans Fund, Home Mutual, .Etna, Hartford, Na- 
tional, Norwalk, Orient, Phttnix, British American, West- 
ern Assurance, Atlas, Commercial Union, London and 
Lancashire, Lyon, Lancashire, London Assurance, Law 
Union and Crown, Liverpool and London and Globe, Im- 
perial, Manchester, Norwich Union, North British and 
Mercantile, Phoenix Assurance, Palatine, Royal Sun, Union 
Assurance, Aachen & Munich, Hamburg-Bremen, Madge- 
burg, North German, Prussian National, Trans-Atlantic, 
Thuringia, German, Traders, Teutonia, Springfield, De- 
troit, Grand Rapids, Michigan, St. Paul, Merchants', 
Newark, Agricultural, American, Citizens, Commercial 
Union, German American, German Alliance, Hanover, 
Home, Niagara, Phoenix, Queen, Rochester, German, 
Victoria, Westchester, Fire Association, Glens Falls, In- 
surance Company of North America, Insurance Company 
of the State of Pennsylvania, Franklin, Union, Pennsylva 
nia Fire, Equitable, Providence Washington, Caledonian, 
Scottish Union & National, Concordia, Northern and Mil- 
waukee Mechanics. 

H. McD. Spencer has established the General Ageucy 
office of the Phoenix of Brooklyn at 415 Montgomery street. 

"Ticket" accident insurance, short term accident poli- 
cies bought by the traveling public at railroad stations 
and other places, is on the decline. The combination ac- 
cident policy, which pays double benefits for injuries and 
death on public conveyances, has knocked some of its 
gilt off. There has long been talk in accident insurance 
circles that the ticket business is not what it was once, 
and many accident underwriters who make a specialty of 
this class of business are pessimistic, and do not think the 
business will pick up. However, despite the drop in the 
sale of tickets, hundreds are sold every day. In former 
times, many of those who bought accident tickets were 
already insured, but when the companies began issuing 
policies everywhere paying double indemnities for acci- 
dents and death while on trains.it was no longer neces- 
sary for these travelers to purchase tickets. 

The General Accident Insurance Company of Philadel- 
phia has been organized by the General Accident of Perth. 
The new company is capitalized at $100,000 and officered 
by W. S. Muir, j. Paul Houghton, J. W. Muir and F. J. 
Moore, all officers of the United States department of the 
Perth Company. The two companies will work in close 
harmony. The real purpose of the organization is stated 
to be for the assumption of the business of the New Eng- 
land Mutual Accident of Boston. 

An interesting point has come up in connection with the 
insurance companies. These organizations now have to 
lodge their capital in the Cuban Treasury, instead of the 
Spanish, as was formerly the case. They take the ground 
that under the new regime the only change is in the place 
of deposit, and that in all other respects the law is as be- 
fore. That is to say, the money can now be paid in Amer- 
ican coinage. Accordingly, a company which must deposit 
a million pesetas need not lodge $200,000, but taking the 
peseta at the present rate of Government exchange, 
which is twelve cents instead of twenty, need lodge only 
$120,000. The question is one doubtless to be finally set- 
tled in the courts. 

When the cats are away the rats will play. When the Madam is 
in the country on her summer vacation is just the time to have your 
carpets taken up, cleaned beautifully and relaid by Spaulding's Carpet 
Cleaning Works at 353 Tehama street. Only experienced workmen 
and the most improved machinery employed. Prices reasonable. 

Bad breath? Bad taste? No appetite f Bilious? Dyspepsia, sure I 
Baldwin's Dyspepsia Capsules, with Balo win's Health Tablets— immediate 
relief; permanent cur e. Ferr y Drug Stor e. 8 Market street. 

Mothers, be sure and use 
children while teething 




'Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 



A Jackson's Napa Soda Lemonade Is up to the Queen's taste. 



Capital Subscribed (4 462 760 

LONDON ASSURANCE, c.pu.ip.idup 2.241.376 

Aaseta 1S.186.146 



OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital Subscribed $6,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 600,000 

AHBCts 2,602,060 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO OAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER 99,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

OHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 489 California St., S. F. 

FlRlIRSURAKCl. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE IN8URANCE CO. LIMITED 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

capital (8,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 810 California St., S. P 

Founded A. D. 1793 

Insurance Company ol North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PBNN. 

Paid-up Capital 18,000.000 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 6.02J.0I6 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 413 California St., S. F. 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720, 

Capital Paid Up, (8,448,100. Assets. 123,870,850 

Surplus to Polloy Holders, 19,891 334. 

FRANK W DICKSON, Ass't Manager. 

601-508 Montgomery St., corner Saoramento. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY, °» N ™ z """™- 

Capital $5,000,000 

UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS. 
Office in company's building, 813 California street. 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager. 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established w* 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. incorporated ™ 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents , 

418 California St., S F 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GEItMANY 
Capital, (2.350.000 Assets. (10.984.24S. 
Paolfio Coast Department: 204-308 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS. CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 



38 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 15, 1899. 



mm 




Tne Colonial House. The inclination to turn back to the 
simplicity and good taste that 
characterized the architecture and house decoration of 
the Colonial period, seems to be growing with each suc- 
ceeding year. In the matter of cottage building there is a 
wide diversity of taste, and some of the quaint and 
picturesque specimens of modern architecture in this line 
are truly tempting to the man or woman who contemplates 
"putting up a house." There are many of us, however, 
who prefer the Colonial style and, after all, there is 
nothing much more attractive when it is consistently 
carried out. The characteristics of tlse Colonial house, 
from a purely architectural point of view, are great 
simplicity and refinement of proportion and detail. The 
impression is one of daintiness, with perhaps a touch of 




The above illustration shows o neat cupboard for the dining-room or 
kitchen, the back of which can be lined with Japanese matting or 
Lincrusto. It can be made by an amateur or carpenter. 

austerity. In the furnishing of a Colonial cottage, the 
first requisite is, of course, consistency of treatment. So 
far as possible, the furniture and hangings should conform 
to the period of which the house is representative. Simpli- 
city, comfort, lightness, daintiness — these should be kept 
in mind and carried out in the purchase and placing of 
every article. The householder who possesses odds and 
ends of the belongings of his Revolutionary ancestors is 
fortunate, especially if he owns a Colonial cottage in which 
to enshrine them — for the prim, spindle-legged tables and 
chairs, or the delightful old presses and bureaus of our 
ancestors, iook best in the staid and simple rooms that 
they were first made to adorn or furnish. In the wild 
scramble for old furniture that has taken place in late 
years, some of us have been left empty-handed, and the 
unfortunates must content themselves with the modern 
imitations of the old styles. Some of these things are 
charming, and are of course to be chosen, in the fitting up 
of a Colonial cottage, in preference to heavier or more 

ornate styles. 

* * # 

The Correct Stylo The surface of a carpet, servir.g as a 

In Carpets. ground to support all objects, should 

be quiet and negative, without strong 

contrast of either forms or colors. The leading forms 



should be so disposed as to distribute the pattern over the 
whole floor, not pronounced either in the direction of 
breadth and length, all "up and down 1 ' treatment being 
erroneous. The decorative forms should be flat, without 
shadow or relief, whether derived from ornament or direct 
from flowers or foliage. In color the general ground 
should be negative, low in tone and iocliningtothe tertiary 
hues, the leading forms of 'he pattern being expressed by 
the darker secondaries; and the primary colors, or white, 
if used at all, should be only in such quantity as to enhance 
the tertiary hues, and to express the geometrical basis 
that rules the distribution of the forms. A Persian pat- 
tern with border all arouDd looks well. A space should be 
left between the border and the skirting board. Floor 
borderings may be in maple, boxwood, or ebony parquet, 
or all the flour uncovered may be stained and polished in 
the usual way. The skirting should always be dark. A 
few lines of coloring may be run upon its moldings, but not 
to ornament it, for its treatment must be simple to get a 
retiring yet bold effect. It may be black, the greater 
portion varnished, with parts left "dead" to obtain a con- 
trast. Brown, rich maroon, dull olive or bronze green 
may be employed. 

All tbe delicious ices, the highest and most appetizing deserts, are 
served at Swain's, 213 Sutter street. This restaurant is popular with 
ladies who are down town shopping. Regular meals are the best in 
the city. Orders for bread, pastries, pies, etc., promptly filled. 



Gentlemen can have private rooms for their luncheon without 
extra charge, at the Maison Ricbe, corner Grant avenue and Geary 
street. Champagne reduced to $4 per quart and $2 per pint. 

Do you drink? Tben mix Jackson's Napa Soda with your tipple. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank 
For the half year ending Juno 30, t89S), a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 0-10) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rat« of three (3) per cent, per an 
num. free of taxes, payable on and after July 1, 1-90. 

S. L. ABBOT JR., Secretary 
Office— 222 Montgomery street, Mills Building. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the half year ending 
June 30. 1899, at the rate of three and eighty-four one hundredths (3 84) per 
oent per annum on Term Deposits, and three and twenty hundredths '3 20) 
per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 
after Saturday, July 1, 1899. Dividends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of dividend as the principal from and after July 1, 1899. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Offloe: 101 Montgomery street, cor Sutter, .-an Francisco Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending with June 30, 1899, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of four 1 4) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and three 

and one-third 13 13) per oent. per annum on ordinary deposits, free of 

taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1899 

GEO. TOTJRNY. Seoietary. 
Office: 526 California street, San Francisoo. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1899, a dividend has been declared at 

the rate of three and six tenths (3 6) per cent per annum on all deposits. 

free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday. July 1, 1899.. 

GEORGE R STORY, Cashier. 
Office: 33 Post street, San Franohco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association of California 
Has declared for the six months ending June 30. 1899, a dividend of 6 per 
cent per annum on ordinary deposits, 7 per cent on one t ear term deposits. 
10 per cert on Class "F" stock, and 14 per cent to Class "A" stock. 
Dr. ED E. HILL. President Capt. OLIVER ELDRIDGE 

WM. CORBIN, Secretary. Vice-President 

Office: 222 Sansome St., San Francisoo, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

Hiberma Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of cue Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, June 28, 1899. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one- third (3H) per cent, per annum on all 
deposits for the six-months ending June 30, 1899, free from all taxes, 
and payable on and after July 1, 1899. 
ROBERT J. TOBIN. Seoretary. 



ST. LAWRENCE 



LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLE 

W. E. Bridge, Proprietor 

423 Post St., b-stween Powell and Mason. 
San Franoisco. Telephone, No. 1828. 




Pries per Otpy. n Cents 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866. 



WS-JBK'TTER 



.«■>■...; ,»,ft«.-ri|<i. .. I. 




Vol. LVIX. 



SAN FRAN CISCO, JULY 22, 1899. 



Number 3 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRKI) MARRIO TT 
6tt Kearny street. San Francisco. Entered at Ban Francisco Post- 
office as Second-class Matter. 

Ths offics of the XEWS LETTER in Hew York City is at Temple Court, 
(Geo. A. Kellogg, Eastern Representative 1, uhere information maybe 
obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

All social items, announcements, advertising, or other matter, intended for 
publication in ths current number of the XKWS LETTER, should be 
sent to this office not later than six o'cloc* Thursday afternoon. 

ON the word of a Baptist deacon we have it that a 
snake milked a cow. The story is incomplete. Baron 
Munchausen would have milked the snake. 



A PROSPECTIVE ticket for 1900: McKinley and 
Roosevelt — smooth politician and rough rider. Plat- 
form: Imperialism. Destiny: Defeat. 

LUNG complaints have furnished a court topic for the 
we^k, and the fashionable set is discussing the anom- 
alous proposition of divorce as a remedy for those lung 
troubles which prevail where there is no affection of the 
lungs. 

SCORE another victory for women's rights. The Amer- 
ican Whist League, which heretofore permitted 
players of the fair sex to share in its contests only as a 
matter of courtesy, has formally recognized women as 
eligible contestants. 

SAITH a local divine: "If a man is handsome and good 
he is a hero." At what a sacrifice, though 1 Sensa- 
tional sheets will never reek with the tale of his deeds, 
and his portrait will never overspread the front page of 
the Sunday supplement. 

TIN from the mines of Cornwall was used to bronze the 
weapons of Homer's heroes. To-day it plates the 
arguments for an American high tariff and bronzes the 
armor of the politician who howls loudest against the 
cheapness of Cornwall tin. 

CANADIAN hostility with reference to the Alaskan 
boundary question has reached a critical stage. The 
jingo singer will soon be heard in the land: "We don't 
want to fight; but if forced to by the Pates, from the 
North Pole down to Mexico will be United States." 

SWIMMING a raging, icy river at midnight, a British 
Columbia hero flagged an excursion train carrying 
four hundred American editors before itreached the point 
where the bridge had burned away. The brave fellow 
fainted upon realizing that he had saved the American 
nation. 

SENATOR Chauncey Depew, in gold-trimmed waist- 
coat, pink satin knickerbockers and cream silk stock- 
ings, has been a revelation to noble Londoners who enter- 
tained false notions of republican simplicity. There is a 
humor about Chauncey that is heartily enjoyable, and, 
oddly enough, it is most apparent when he is serious. 

THE Supervisorial ring of Alameda County concluded 
to sound the knell of the political hopes of an inde- 
pendent coroner, and instituted an "investigation" de- 
signed to stir up an offensive odor about the morgue. The 
coroner "carried the war into Africa," and the people 
across the bay are holding their nostrils till the blessed 
breezes blow away the nauseating effluvium stirred up by 
the intended victim in the quarters of his baffled enemies. 
The situation has been reversed; the "investigation" has 
become a sort of an "inquest." 



DECIDUOUS fruit growers of California will receive a 
net return of $5,000,000 on their Eastern sales for 
1899. Fortune has been profuse with her bounty in the 
Golden West. A crop shortage in the Atlantic States in- 
creases the value of our excellent yield, and our orchard- 
ists have reason to congratulate themselves on a most, 
prosperous season. 

PECULIARLY grateful to Providence should the Cres- 
cent City be since the vicious editor of the Thunder- 
bolt, by slaying the depraved editor of the Thomas Cat, 
has reasonably assured his own election to the gallows. 
The murderer merits hanging with a silken rope for his 
effective aid in the matter of removing two moral can- 
cer spots from the face of Louisiana. 

TWO miles a minute by rail is the marvelous speed 
promised by an Eastern inventor, whose model train 
is built on the smooth lines of ac ocean steamship, with 
the object of diminishing to a great extent the resistance 
of the wind. With the completion of the Russian Imperial 
railway, and the general introduction of the ship-shaped 
flyers, the twentieth century will possibly record a twenty- 
day trip around the world. 

RUMORS are flying to the effect that the German-Lloyd 
Steamship Company has determined to operate a line 
of vessels between this city and the Orient, and that the 
Vanderbilts are perfecting plans for a transcontinental 
railway with its terminus on San Francisco Bay. The 
rumors may be false, but they seem almost reasonable 
enough to speculate upon. Here is the Pacific mart of 
ti ade, and the richest commerce of the nation will soon be 
that of the western sea. 



KENTUCKY has suffered another foul blot on her 
escutcheon, and the blue grass of Clay County has 
been crimsoned with the blood of five fresh victims of fac- 
tional feud. To settle their differences the mountaineers 
of that barbarous district appeal not to the law, but to 
the gun; and since the arm of authority is powerless there, 
it were well if the battles of the warring clans waxed hot- 
ter and deadlier, and ceased not until the last of the Clay- 
County belligerents became a fertilizing element in the 
soil once cursed by his steps. 

SWORDING to a Sunday magazine writer, had our 
beloved Washington received the proper training he 
would have been not only the most illustrious soldier and 
statesman of his day, but also the peerless heavy-weight 
of the prize-ring, champion Grseco-Roman wrestler and 
holder of the record for long-distance foot-racing. Could 
Washington have met Mr. Jeffries in a finish glove con- 
test, the Los Angeles boy would have been annihilated. 
Patriotic zeal has probably deemed the showing necessary 
to an ample appreciation of Washington's manifold qualifi- 
cations for the title of "First in Peace." 



IN accordance with the suggestions advanced by the 
News Letter, the Board of Resents of the State Uni- 
versity conceded every demand of Professor Benjamin Ide 
Wheeler, who then formally accepted the tender of the 
Presidency. A new era is about to dawn f >r Berkeley, 
and when the model university buildings rise on that 
magnificent site overlooking the Golden Gate, we opine 
that the fame of this Californian institution as a home of 
knowledge and learning will be in keeping with the 
grandeur of those edifices which are destined to be the 
admiration of the world. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1899. 



VAST IMPORTANCE OF THE ORIENTAL TRADE. 



CALIFORNIA'S highest possibilities in the domain of 
commerce lie in the development of the Oriental 
trade. The proposition is plain; it admits of no dispute. 
A market for all our surplus wheat is opened to us in 
China, and neither prejudice nor ignorance should blind us 
to the golden opportunities now spread out before us. 
The nations of the old world are now competing for this 
Asiatic trade; but the government and people of the 
Celestial Empire prefer to deal with the American nation, 
and a business alliance with a country that boasts of 
nearly half the population of the globe is ours if we but 
ask for it. Riches are there for us if we but reach out for 
them in the spirit of fair exchange. 

If it be granted that the American republic is destined 
at no remote day to control the China trade, it must be 
patent to the people of this State, and especially to the 
merchants of this city, that action cannot be delayed if we 
would direct the course of progress to the end that San 
Francisco may become the focal city for the commerce of 
the East and California the great beneficiary. The 
merchants of Puget Sound are already moving in the mat- 
ter. They are devoting their best energies to the task of 
securing, if possible, the bulk of Oriental commerce for 
the bustling young cities which have sprung up like magic 
on the shores of that inland sea. 

There are two great harbors on the Pacific Coast. One 
of them is in the State of Washington. The other, and 
the greatest, lies here at our feet. To which of these 
shall come the imperial procession of rich-laden Chinese 
argosies? From which of these shall go the matchless 
array of American wheat ships bound for the Asian coast? 
As the Hon. F. X. Schoonmaker said, in discussing this 
identical point: "The race will be to the swift, and we 
must run to win." 



In an address delivered under the auspices of the State 
Board of Trade, on Monday evening last, the distinguished 
gentleman whose name we have mentioned opened the 
mental eyes of an audience of intellectual Americans on 
the subject of "China and Her Awakening." It became 
palpable that we are practically unacquainted with that 
wonderful empire. Its history, people, customs, beliefs, 
are as foreign to us as its language. We have seen the 
Chinese only in their grosser aspect. The most we know 
of them, perhaps, is with reference to the opium vice, in- 
troduced into China by the Christian nations of Europe. 
The Chinaman is a strong character. He belongs to the 
one homogeneous race of the world. There is no affinity 
between the Chinese and the races belonging to Caucasian 
civilization. The Chinese possess more volumes of Uterary, 
scientific and art works than all other nations together. 
The empire was old when Babylon and Assyria were 
young. It had a written language 2,000 years before the 
Savior's birth. It is governed by a code of morals handed 
down from Confucius, who makes the virtue of honesty ap- 
peal to every man's self-interest. 

"Pay thy debts," says Confucius. "If all men pay their 
debts, credit wil! be universal, goods will be sold for the 
lowest prices, and all men will be benefited." The Chinese 
get rid of the man who will not pay his debts when he can. 
Such a man is a criminal. He would raise the price of 
living, and his offense is against all the people. Never a 
cent is lost by Americans who lend money to the Chinese. 

It was China that first developed wheat from a wild 
seed, and she raised it till the wheat elements of her soil 
were exhausted. She did the same with maize and with 
tobacco. The Chinese invented weaving, paper and 
earthenware, and brought porcelain making to such high 
perfection as to defy imitation. They discovered iron, 
and were the first to make steel, the first to temper cop- 
per, the first to develop bronze. 

China has decided to go into manufactures to buy her 
food. She has discovered a method whereby there is com- 
paratively no material loss in silk from the cocoon to the 
finished texture, and she promises to make silk as cheap 
as calico. 

China has been forced into the world of manufacture and 
trade by vital necessity. In 1892, her population, then 
conservatively estimated by Lord Curzon at 550,000,000 



souls, passed the point of subsistence. The food of China 
was beginning to lose its nutriment. The rice had failed 
in the exhausted soil. A substitute for rice was neces- 
sary, and the government chose flour. 

"Can the world yield flour enough?" asks Mr. Schoon- 
maker. "China will take 2,000,000,000 bushels a year." 
Siberia cannot furnish it. Argentina crops are unre- 
liable. The Chinese Government decided, after thorough 
investigation, that the only country on earth that could be 
relied upon for this food supply was the United States of 
America. China is not to-day in a normal condition. Her 
actual population is over five hundred millions. When 
China had arranged to feed her starving millions, the vul- 
tures of Europe swooped upon her, and threatened, in 
spite of her, to partition her vast territory. The United 
States has shown her strength, however, and this repub- 
lic must now be reckoned with in every great international 
complication. 

To be China's friend need not affect the exclusion act; 
but to be China's friend will mean renewed and augmented 
prosperity for this country, and especially for this favored 
portion of it by the Western ocean. 

China is a rich country — rich in mines of coal, iron, cop- 
per, gold. It is the greatest field imaginable for the play 
of American energy and enterprise. When we trade with 
Europe we are simply a competing nation. To trade with 
China means, not the low prices of competition, but the 
high prices of barter. Let our Senators and Congress- 
men, as well as our Chambers of Commerce and Boards of 
Trade, move in this all-important matter without delay. 
The magic index of our future commercial power in 
nation, State and city points in the direction of the 
Orient. 

Alger Kicked Out. The resignation by Russell A. Alger 
of the war portfolio is an official 
action that has been regarded as inevitable for the past 
six months. The charges of incompetence brought against 
the Secretary of War by the whole country have been 
crushing and unanswerable. In his own party they have 
been quite as persistent as outside of it. The Secretary's 
administration has been a succession of blunders, so broad 
and deep that they constitute crimes against the nation. 
It cannot be said that • Mr. Alger is absolutely corrupt; 
but his record will always be one of the humiliations of the 
Republican party and of McKinley's administration. The 
man from Michigan is both weak and vicious. A petty 
politician who carried into great national affairs his small 
individual prejudices and personal revenges, Alger ex- 
cited the alarm of the President, whose chances for re- 
election he imperils, disgusted his immediate associates, 
and aroused the contempt of the independent intelligence 
of the country irrespective of party. He returns to pri- 
vate life irretrievably disgraced. 



Finishing Up The The Peace Congress that has been 
Hague Business, assembled at The Hague for some time 
past is closing up its business without 
having resolved upon any of the great measures that have 
been hoped for. Yet it has been productive of good in 
more ways than one. It is much that the great powers 
have admitted that the area of possible war is too large, 
and the excuses for disturbing the peace of nations far 
too flimsy and too numerous. Arbitration, exemption 
from seizure of private property at sea, and other im- 
portant peace proposals have been discussed, and another 
conference has been determined upon for next year. Dur- 
ing the interval these projects will be discussed by all the 
great nations, and it may fairiy be expected that by that 
time they will be ready for some sort of action. It was 
hardly to be looked for that the conference would reach 
conclusions at the first attempt. The making of inter- 
national laws always involves much patience, diplomacy 
and time. But when a large body begins to gain mo- 
mentum its progress is rapid. The delegates now know 
the difficulties in the way, and in time these will, in good 
part, be composed by diplomacy and the genius of com- 
promise. The world has made this great move forward, 
and it will not go backward. Besides, there are impera- 
tive reasons why something should be done. The armed 



July 72, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO {TOWS UvTTF.R. 



camp that Europe is cannot be much longer maintained 
without sapping the very vitals of even the greai' 
the powers. The need of them all is — peace. With war 
perpetually hanging over their heads, the possibilities of 
commerce must remain, to a large extent, in abeyance. 
When men get to talking about an end, and agree that it 
is good, they will find some way to attain it. During the 
last fifty years they have been drawing nearer to it all 
the time. There is a vast body of international law in ex- 
istence now that was unknown in the not very distant 
past. It is a gratifying circumstance that the country- 
men of Wheaton are among the foremost in the confer- 
ence, sitting in the city which gave birth to Grotius, in 
urging measures looking to the restraint by international 
regulation of the destructive influences of war. It was 
singularly appropriate that the delegates of the latter- 
day diplomacy should have placed a wreath of silver on 
the tomb of Hugo Grotius, whose great work, "De Jure 
Belli et Paces," has secured for him the title of the father 
of modern international law. The great Dutch publicist 
has inspired several generations of diplomats, and it was 
fitting that a recognition of his services should come from 
the countrymen of Wheaton, who has given to the world 
the standard treatise on existing international law. The 
works of these men were the undoubted forerunners of the 
great Peace Conference. The good seed they have sown 
will continue to grow. 



tor than the right of free speorh anil fi 

Em in l-'ram-e when the highest Court* Martin: w. 

bauched, and the greatest officers of the army n 

that forgery and perjury were justitiiil bj tl 
n of an innocent man. it was found im 
muzzle the press, and, as a consequence, the pen of /.ola 
freed Dreyfus, and the whole world looked on and ap- 
plauded. Yet we have, it appears, abandoned ft 
and free publication in America. The round robin of the 
press correspondents at Manila abundantly demonstrates 
that fact. No dispatch could be wired, and no letter 
mailed of which General Otis did not approve. What he 
disapproved of was, not revelations to the enemy, but 
matters touching his own incompetence and failure. For 
months be telegraphed that he needed no more troops, and 
that the Filipinos were about to collapse, yet he finished 
his campaign at Cavite, the very point from which be had 
started, and after finishing the hardest battle of the cam- 
paign. Surely if mothers and fathers, who have sent their 
sons to the war, are not entitled to know these things, 
what are they entitled to know? If the administration 
does not want to know these things, what have they to 
say to the people who pay the cost, and want to know 
what they are getting for their blood and money? The 
truth is that the Filipino Campaign is a failure beyond 
anything known in this country and press censorship is 
being resorted to in order to hide the facts. 



Trusts That Came To The people down in Texas were in 
The Aid Of a bad way the other day. The 

The Flooded Texans. floods came and carried away their 
homes, their live stock, their food, 
and the possibility of making fires with which to keep 
themselves warm. Theirs was a sorry plight indeed I It 
looked as if thousands of them must die for want of food 
and shelter. Organized efforts on their behalf were, how- 
ever, soon under way. Arrangements were made for 
rescuing people floating in houses, and on logs, hay stacks 
and the like. Merchants sent along provisions, and the 
railroads made desperate efforts to carry all to points of 
safety. As a result, there were fewer deaths, and less 
discomforts than might reasonably have been expected. 
It is a curious circumstance that the most generous con- 
tributors to the homeless and ruined victims of these dis- 
astrous floods in Texas, were railway companies,, and other 
corporations having large investments in that State. 
These liberal offerings coming so soon after the passage 
of the severest of all anti-trust laws, and after the Texas 
Attorney General's declaration of war against the whole 
brood of corporations, may suggest to that impetuous 
official that, in certain cases, such enterprises are exceed- 
ingly handy things to have in the neighborhood. Cer- 
tainly he will delay his threatened destruction of the 
Trusts long enough to permit them to hand in their con- 
tributions to the relief fund. 



What Is the Use If there is any one thing more than 
Of a Censorship ? another that the American people 
love, in the conduct of their public 
affairs, it is the open truth. And there is the best of all 
reasons for their love. They are the sovereigns to whom 
must finally come the arbitrament of all deeds done in their 
name. They cannot pass judgment on affairs about which 
they are either misinformed or misled. Thus they have 
declared that "no law shall ever be passed to abridge the 
liberty of the press," and that "every person may write, 
speak and publish his sentiments upon all subjects, being 
responsible therefor to the law." There is a law against 
libel and slander, after they have been published but not 
before. There is a law against sedition and treason, but 
not before somebody has advised or committed an overt 
act. No court can issue an injunction forbidding a future 
publication. That has been decided by the highest courts, 
over and over again. It can punish an actual publication, 
if it violates a law, but cannot prevent it. A true report 
of military operations in the field, is not a libel, or a 
slander, or an act of treason, and therefore cannot be 
stopped, except by illegal force, before or after publication. 
Our rights in the premises are the very corner stones of 
liberty and independence. There can be no safety in this 
country against militarism in its worse form, other or bet- 



The Manufacturing Era The new era of Californian pros- 
Of California. perity has dawned, wherein ad- 

vantage is being taken of our 
great diversity of interests, and a multitude of industries 
are now rising in every section of this great State where 
years ago their establishment was a thing undreamed of. 
The whole country concedes the supremacy of California 
in fruits and wines; and the world knows the tale of our 
matchless mines by heart. But it is in the realm of manu- 
facture that we are destined to make the most remark- 
able strides, and already the procession is moving to the 
front. 

Our innumerable mountain streams are being curbed 
and harnessed, and are supplying electric energy to the 
cities. This magnificent power is driving the mill wheel 
and the factory wheel from one end of the State to the 
other, solving the fuel problem and encouraging the in- 
vestment of capital in new enterprises. Our richest 
placers will no doubt be found in the field of manufacture. 

The East is becoming dependent on us for additional 
products year by year, and the time has arrived when we 
are almost in a position to compete with the older States 
in lines of which they once boasted a monopoly. 

Our redwood timber as a building material is in strong 
demand on the other side of the Kockies, and Eastern 
money is steadily pouring into the laps of our northern 
lumber districts. 

Formerly we shipped rawhides East to be tanned and 
made into leather, but only a few days ago, from the city 
of Stockton, a refrigerator car load of sole leather was 
started out over the Santa Fe route to the Chicago 
market. This leather was made by being tanned with 
California oak bark, which, according to the opinion of 
competent experts, produces the finest and best leather 
in the world. That carload was the first through ship- 
ment of the kind to the queen city of the lakes. 

Since it is conceded that leather tanned with our native 
oak bark is superior to any other, an impetus to manufac- 
tures in leather on this coast is one of the certain results, 
and this means more money in the channels of trade, more 
employment for labor, and better times. 

Doubtless, before the lapse of many years, California 
will be shipping large consignments of leather-made goods 
into the territory where New England firms have long de- 
fied competition. The mighty West is profiting by the 
lessons received from the dependent East. Our State 
has discovered her power where she once deemed herself 
weak. We can manufacture everything we need from a 
toothpick to a battleship, just as cheaply and just as well 
as they can do it on the other side of the continent. The 
old delusions that held us back have been laughed away, 
and the new spirit has quickened every impulse of com- 
merce, industry and trade. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 22, 1899. 



"FORCIBLE ANNEXATION "— " CRIMINALA GGRESSION "— 

"BENEVOLENT ASSIMILATION." 

Official Documents For Future Historians. 

EDITOR News Letter, City. Dear Sir:— Recent utter- 
ances of California expansionists, Fourth of July 
orations, and pulpit asseverations are so deplorably one- 
ided and partial in regard to our war on the Filipinos — 
"Forcible Annexation," "Criminal Aggression," etc. — 
that I trust you will find space for the following in 
rebuttal: 

"In August, 1896, an insurrection broke out in Cavite 
under the leadership of Emilio Aguinaldo, and soon spread 
to other provinces on both sides of Manila. It continued 
with varying successes on both sides, and the trial and 
execution of numerous insurgents, until December, 1897, 
when the Governor-General, Primo de Rivera, entered in- 
to written agreement with Aguinaldo It re- 
quired that Aguinaldo and the other insurgent leaders 
should leave the country, the government agreeing to pay 
them $800,000 in silver and promising to introduce numer- 
ous reforms, including representation in the Spanish 
Cortes, freedom of the press, general amnesty for all in- 
surgents, and the expulsion or secularization of the 
monastic orders. 

" Aguinaldo and his associates went to Hong Kong and 
Singapore. A portion of the money, $400,000, was de- 
posited in banks at Hong Kong, and a lawsuit soon arose 
between Aguinaldo and one of his subordinate chiefs, 
named Artacho, which is interesting on account of the 
very honorable position taken by Aguinaldo. Artacho 
sued for a division of the money among the insurgents, ac- 
cording to rank. Aguinaldo claimed that the money was a 
trust fund, and was to remain on deposit until it was seen 
whether the Spaniards would carry out their promised re- 
forms; and if they failed to do so, it was to be used to 
defray the expenses of a new insurrection. The suit was 

settled out of court by paying Artacho $5,000 

Aguinaldo is now using the money to carry on the opera- 
tions of the present insurrection." 

(Memoranda concerning the situation in the Philippines on August 
30, 1898, bv P. V. Ureene, Major-general 17. 8. V ., Senate Document 
No. 62, Part 1, Fiity-Hfth Congress, Third Session.) 

Consulate-General of the U. S., 
"Singapore, April 28, 1898. — On the evening of Satur- 
day, the 23rd instant, I was confidentially informed of the 
arrival here, incognito, of the supreme leader of the 
Philippine insurgents, General Emilio Aguinaldo, by Mr. 
Howard W. Bray, an English gentleman of high standing, 
who, after fifteen years' residence as a merchant and 
planter in the Philippines, bad been compelled by the dis- 
turbed condition of things resulting from Spanish misrule 
to abandon his property and leave there, and from whom 
I had previously obtained much valuable information for 
Commodore Dewey regarding fortifications, coal deposits, 
etc., at different points in the islands. 

" Being aware of the great prestige of General Aguin- 
aldo with the insurgents, and that no one, either at home 
or abroad, could exert over them the same influence and 
control that he could, I determined at once to see him, 
and, at my request, a secret interview was accordingly 
arranged for the following morning, Sunday, the 24th, in 
which, besides General Aguinaldo, were only present the 
General's trusted advisers aud Mr. Bray, who acted as 

interpreter I telegraphed the Commodore 

the same day as follows, through our Consul-General at 
Hong Kong: 

" 'Aguinaldo, insurgent leader, here. Will come Hong 
Kong. Arrange with Commodore for general cooperation 
insurgents Manila if desired. Telegraph. Pratt.' 

" The Commodore's reply reading thus: 
" 'Tell Aguinaldo come soon as possible. Dewey.' 

" I received it late that night, and at once communi- 
cated to General Aguinaldo, who, with his aide-de-camp 
and private secretary, all under assumed names, I suc- 
ceeded in getting off by the British steamer 'Malacca,' 
which left here on Tuesday, the 26th. 
E. Spencer Pratt, U. S. Consul-General at Singapore." 
(Senate Document No. 62, Parti, Fifty-fifth Congress, Third Ses- 
sion, Dispatch No. 212.) 



Consulate-General of the U. S. 
"Singapore, May 5, 1898. — I regret to have to report 
that the circumstances attending the departure from here 
of General Emilio Aguinaldo to join Commodore Dewey, 
which I had endeavored so hard to prevent being disclosed, 
were, in substance, made public in yesterday's edition of 
the 'Singapore Free Press.' .... The facts are, in 
the main, correctly given. 

E. Spencer Pratt, U. S. Consul-General at Singapore." 
(Senate Document No. 62, Part 1, Fifty-fifth Congress, Third Ses- 
sion, Dispatch No. 217.) 

" The Consul-General of the United States, coinciding 
with the general views expressed during the discussion, 
placed himself at once in telegraphic communication with 
Admiral Dewey at Hong Kong, between whom and Mr. 
Pratt a frequent interchange of telegrams consequently 
took place. General Aguinaldo's policy embraces the in- 
dependence of the Philippines, whose internal affairs would 
be controlled under European and American advisers. 
American protection would be desirable temporarily, on 
the same lines as that which might be instituted hereafter 
in Cuba." 

(From the article alluded to by Mr. Pratt in Dispatch No. 217, in 
the "Singapore Free Press," May 4, ""' 



U. S. S. "Baltimore," 
Consulate of the United States. 

" Manila, (Philippine Islands), June 16, 1898. — I have 
the honor to report that since our squadron destroyed the 
Spanish fleet on May 1, the insurgent forces have been 
most active and almost uniformly successful in their many 
encounters with the crown forces of Spain. General 
Emilio Aguinaldo, the insurgent chief, who was deported 
late in 1897, returned recently to Cavite and resumed 
direction of insurgent forces. He is not permitted by his 
people to personally lead in battle, but from headquarters 
governs all military movements. He told me to-day that 
since his return his forces had captured nearly 5,000 
prisoners, nearly 4,000 of whom were Spaniards, and all 
of whom had rifles when taken. General Aguinaldo has 
now about 10,500 rifles and 8 field-pieces, with 8,000 more 
rifles, 2 Maxim guns, and a dynamite gun bought in China 
and now in transit. The insurgents have defeated the 
Spaniards at all points except at fort near Malate, and hold 
not only North Luzon to the suburbs of Manila, but 
Batanyes province also, and the bay coast entire, save 
the city of Manila. 

While the Spaniards cruelly and barbarously slaughter 
Filipinos taken in arms, and of ten non-combatants, women 
and children, the insurgent victors, following American 
example, spare life, protect the helpless, and nurse, feed, 
and care for Spaniards taken prisoners and for Spanish 
wounded as kindly as they care for the wounded fallen 
from their own ranks. 

Oscar F. Williams, U. S. Consul." 
(Senate Document No. 62, Part 1, Fifty-fifth Congress, Third Session). 

On the 27th of June, 1898, Admiral Dewey sent the fol- 
lowing to the Secretary of the Navy: 

"Aguinaldo, insurgent leader, with thirteen of his staff, 
arrived May 19th, by permission, on the Nashan. I have 
given him to understand that I consider insurgents as 
friends, being opposed to a common enemy. He has gone 
to attend a meeting of insurgent leaders for the purpose 
of forming a civil Government. In my opinion these peo- 
ple are far superior in their intelligence and more capable 
of self-government than the natives of Cuba, and I am 
familiar with both races." 

U. S. Naval Force on Asiatic Station, 
Flagship "Baltimore." 

"Manila, Philippine Islands, Aug. 29, 1898. — In a 
telegram sent to the Department on June 23d I expressed 
the opinion that 'these people are far superior in their 
intelligence and more capable of self-government than the 
natives of Cuba, and I am familiar with both races.' Fur- 
ther intercourse with them has confirmed me in this opin- 
ion. George Dewey, Rear-Admiral, U. S. Navy. 
(Senate DocumentNo. 62, Part 1, Fifty-fifth Congress, Third Session). 

" On the 18th of June Aguinaldo issued a proclamation 



July si, 1899. 



SAN" PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



from Cavite establishing a dictatorial government, with 
himself as dictator .... This WM followed OD June 20 bv 
a decree giving more detailed instructions in regard to the 
elections. On June 23 another decree followed changing 
the title of the Government from dictatorial to revohitirm- 
ary, and of the chief officer from dictator to president, 

announcing the cabinet The powers of the I 

dent and Congress were defined, and a code of mi'itary 
justice was formulated. On the same date a iiiuuif.--t''> 
was issued to the world, explaining the purposes and rea- 
sons of the revolution. On June 27 th another decree was 
issued containing instructions in regard to elections. On 
August fith an address was issued to foreign Governments 
stating that the revolutionary Government was in opera- 
tion and control in fifteen provinces, and that in response 
to the petition of the duly elected chiefs of these provinces 
an appeal is made for recognition of belligerancy and in- 
dependence." 

{'. Memoranda concerning the situation in the Philippines on Aug. 
30, 1898, by F. V. Greene. Major-General I". S. V., Senate Document 
No. 82, Part t, Fifty-fifth Congress, Third Session.) 



"The United States Government, through its naval 
commander, has to some extent made use of the Filipinos 
for a distinct military purpose, viz., to harass and annoy 
the Spanish troops, to wear them out in the trenches, to 
blockade Manila on the land side, and to do as much dam- 
age as possible to the Spanish Government prior to the 
arrival of our troops; and for this purpose the Admiral 
allowed them to take arms and munitions which he had 
captured at Cavite, and their ships to pass in and out of 
Manila Bay in their expeditions against other provinces." 

(Memoranda concerning the situation in the Philippines on Aug. 
30, 1898. by F. V. Greene, Major-General U. S. V., Senate Document 
No. 62, Part 1, Fifty-fifth Congress, Third Session.) 

"January 5, 1899.— The military Government hereto- 
fore maintained by the United States in the city, harbor, 
and bay of Manila is to be extended with all possible dis- 
patch to the whole of the ceded territory." 

(Proclamation by President William McKinley, promulgated in 
the Philippines). 

" February 4, 1899. — Firing upon the Filipinos and the 
killing of one of them by the Americans, leading to return 
fire." 
(Major-General E. S. Otis, Eeport up to April 6, 1E99).- 

" February 4, 1899. — The chief insurgent leaders did not 
wish to open hostilities at that time." 
(Major-General E. S. Otis, Keport up to April 6, 1899). 

"February 5, 1899. — General Torres, of the insurgents, 
came through the lines under a flag of truce, and had a 
personal interview with General Otis, in which, speaking 
for Aguinaldo, he declared that the fighting had begun 
accidentally and was not authorized by Aguinaldo; that 
Aguinaldo wished to have it stopped, and that to bring 
about a conclusion of hostilities he proposed the establish- 
ment of a neutral zone between the two armies of any 
width that would be agreeable to General Otis, so that 
during the peace negotiations there might be no further 
danger of conflict between the two armies. To these rep- 
resentations of General Torres, General Otis sternly re- 
plied that the fighting, having once begun, must go on 
to the grim end." 

(General C. McReeve, lately returned to Minnesota from duty in 
Manila. Interview in St. Paul Globe). 

"February 9, 1899. — Aguinaldo now applied for a cessa- 
tion of hostilities and conference; have declined to answer." 
(Major-General E. S. Otis, Eeport). 

"Hongkong, March 8, 1899.— The State documents 
lately published furnish food for reflection by Americans 
generally who value their national word of honor pledged 
to General Aguinaldo in Singapore on April 26th last, by 
the American Consul-General, in my presence whilst acting 
as interpreter. It is undignified and unworthy of a great 
nation to be guilty of such duplicity, and now say the Con- 
sul had no power to offer any such thing. As a matter 
of fact, the Consul did not offer it of his own responsibility, 
but acting under the instructions of Admiral Dewey. In 



the first interview the conditions of General Aguinaldo's 
policy were cleu lubmltV 

latter cabled his a< 

proceed with every possible haste to Hong Koos 
leave in the first availabi' HcCul- 

loch. I was roused from my bed at midnight by the Con- 
sul to look up Aguinaldo and communicate the telegram 
to him, in order that he might catch a steamer leaving at 
daylight in the morning. This has not yet been made pub- 
lic, but I think the time has now arrived when reserve is 
no loneer justifiable, after this shameful treatment of the 
Filipinos by the Americans. It is no use to argue that 
Dewey had no authority, because, from the State docu- 
ments lately published, we learn that Dewey had instruc- 
tions to use his discretion, and agreeably with this dis- 
cretion he brought back Aguinaldo to Luzon under the 
promise of independence, whilst Consul Wildman, of Hong 
Kong, supplied him with several cargoes of arms and 
ammunition. No amount of official or diplomatic denial can 
alter these facts." 
(Howard W. Bray, April 15, 1899.) 

Let facts be submitted to a candid world. 

John J. Valentine. 
San Franchco, July 17, 1899. 

Champagne, Imports In 1898 
Aggregated 242,319 cases, of which 86,855 cases were G. H. Mumm s 
Extra Dry, the acme of perfection. Bottles will bear green neck- 
band and star label. 

Bad breath! Bad taste? No appetite? Bilious? Dyspepsia, euro I 
Baldwin's Dyspepsia Capsules, with Baldwin's Health Tablets— immediate 
relief; permanent cure. Perry Drug Store. 8 Market street. 

Jackson's Napa Soda leaves a good taste in the mouth.. 
Regulate your conduot and your system by drinking Jaokson's Napa Soda 



BEAMISH 

HAS REMOVED to 
209 Montgomery St. 

Directly Opposite Entrance Mills Building 
Established 30 Years. 
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CAHEN &. SON, Agents, 

418 Sacramento Street, S. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1899. 




TRANSPORT NEWPORT. 



Photo by Maurer, 220 Sutftir 81. 










GAMP SCENE, OREGON REGIMENT. 



Photo by Weidner, 22% Geary St. 






July J2, 1899. 



FRANV \VS III 




OFFICERS OF OREGON REGIMENT. 



Photo by Weidner. rr .;. <:> dry si. 




OREGON REGIMENT VAN NESS AVENUE- 



Photo by Ba'his, 11 C:e3ry St. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 22, 1899. 




THERE is a rumor to the effect that the "indisposi- 
tion" of a very charming girl of society is the result 
of a severe fall in trying to do the backward fall seen in 

the Dancing Girl. 

* * # 

When the side lights show us the chubby-faced damsel 
who leans with confiding air upon the paternal care of 
the friendly benedict, the censorious old dame looks on, 
but in this case does not find the fault she would were the 
affair in other quarters. Platonics are believed in in this 
case. The elderly maiden who is so fond of cards enjoys 
Del Monte most when "the crowd" is not there, and the 
widower can come or go without comment. 

* # # 

If the war in the Philippines continues during the au- 
tumn the wives of the army officers who have gone to 
Manila are contemplating a trip over there themselves. 
It seems a young officer, recently returned on sick leave, 
gave such glowing accounts to the wife of a very promi- 
nent army man in that region that she has been stirring 
herself in the matter; and the report goes that Secretary 
Alger will allow a shipload of femininity to cross the raging 
main before winter sets in. 

* # * 

If Mrs. Oelrichs starts an automobile race with another 
fashionable woman in New York, it goes without saying 
that we may expect some of her enthusiastic following 
out here to emulate her example. Doubtless the auburn 
tressed demoiselle or one of the several sisters will be the 
first to be heard from when the auto reaches this city. 

* * * 

Some people are wondering if the recently arrived bride 
knows the majority of the women who have rushed to call 
have been dying to see the rara avis who succeeded in cap- 
turing that flirt of flirts who always — as the song says — 
"took his hat and walked away" when the climax had been 

reached. 

» * # 

It is rumored — whether fact or no we do not vouch — 
that the gav widower who prolonged his stay the other 
side of the Rncuies has sentimental reasons for doing so, 
and that it is quite among the probabilities he may bring 

an Eastern bride with him when he returns. 

* * # 

What a glorious time the swim is going to have when 
the splendid mansion now building is completed and opened 
by the popular wife of the Island capitalist; for if any one 
loves to have a good time and share it with her friends it 
is this hospitable dame. 

ft ft 11 

On dit, we may expect to hear of a wedding in the Swiss 
chateau so <rx after the arrival in that country of the popu- 
lar family just goue from our midst, gossip asserting that 
an engagement of several years' standing will be consum- 
mated. 

* ft * 

The matron who summers at San Rafael with her many 
sons is being much sought by girls who desire an invita- 
tion to visit her there. 

* * * 

On dit, handsome Harry is captive to the charms of a 
Bakersfield lady, and gossip also asserts the sister-in-law 
is very pleased. 

PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A Sovereiqu Remedy. One doae will stop a cough. It never fails. 
Try it. Price, 26 cents. Geobge Dahlbekdee & Co., 214 Kearny 
street. For sale by all druggists. 



In times 01 peace; m times of war, 
The favorite drink is Jesse Moore. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co., 748 
Market street. San Francisco. 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda before breakfast. 



,».&<&&&<$ 









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REV. EDWARD B. CHURCH. A. M. 



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Boarding and Day School for Young Men and Boys \ 

Prepares for University and College; accredited with the Univer- 
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eleven Professors and Teachers. Boarders limited to thirty-five. 
Christmas Term opens August 1st 

Rev. Db. E. B. Spalding, Rector. 



H. J. STEWART, Mus. D. 

Has removed his Music Studio to 

1406 Van Ness Avenue, 



Between Bush and Pine. 



The Solly Walter School of Illustration 

Wil Ire-open Auoust 1st for the fall and winter term. 

26 O'Farrelt St- 

PROF. WALTER WATSON, £5 n ? SSTPh^Sli^cSK^: 

Lessons private, in class, or at your resldenoe. 

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July 32, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.LTTKR. 




imperial Democracy. Under the well-chosen title, "Im- 
perial Democracy," David Starr 
Jordan, President of Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 
has grouped together eight addresses, delivered during 
the past year at different times and places, all bearing on 
the policy of the United States, especially concerning the 
war with Spain and its results. Federalism or Imoerial- 
ism — whbh shall it be? is the question President Jordan 
sets before the nation, and both sides of the issue he dis- 
cusses with rare ability and entire fairness, although op- 
posing every step toward imperialism, the three main 
reasons for which he gives as follows: 

"First, dominion is brute force; second, dependent 
nations are slave nations; third, the making of men is 
greater than the building of empires." Good government 
at home must precede good government of dependencies, 
the author states, and again and again he reiterates his 
belief that any movement toward broad dominion would be 
a step downward: 

"It would be to turn from our highest purposes to drift 
with the current of manifest destiny. It would be not to 
do the work of America, but to follow the ways of the 
rest of the world. I make no plea for indifference or self- 
sufficiency or isolation for isolation's sake. To shrink 
from world movements or to drift with the current is 
alike unworthy of our origin and destiny. Only this I 
urge: let our choice be made with open eyes, not at the 
dictates of chance disguised as 'Manifest Destiny.' Un- 
forgetting, counting all the cost, let us make our decision. 
Let ours be sober, fearless, prayerful choice. The federal 
republic — the imperial republic — which shall it be?" 

The first lecture in the volume, "Lest We Forget," takes 
its title from Kipling's "Recessional," which President Jor- 
dan eulogizes as the "noblest hymn of our century." The 
second chapter is devoted to an address delivered before 
the Congress of Religions at Omaha in October, 1898, and 
treats of Colonial Expansion. In it the author says: 

"To come to 'our place among the nations' will be to 
show that democracy can give good government, govern- 
ment firm, dignified, economical, just. It does not mean 
to have everybody talking about us, to carry our flag into 
every sea, and to spread rank imbecility over a hundred 
scattered islands." 

In the third paper, "A Blind Man's Holiday," President 
Jordan maintains the proposition that we should withdraw 
from the Philippine Islands as soon as in dignity we can: 

"It is bad statesmanship to make these alien people our 
partners; it is a crime to make them our slaves." * * * 
' ' These people must first be free before they can enter a nation 
of freemen." 

The chapter on "Colonial Lessons of Alaska" contains a 
valuable object lesson illustrating methods to be avoided 
in the rule of future colonies. When over thirty years 
ago (1867) the United States purchased from Russia the 
vast territory of Alaska, rich in native resources, and a 
population of about 32,000, they all supported themselves 
mainly by hunting and fishiDg. The sale of the furs of the 
sea otter and the blue fox enabled them to procure many 
of the luxuries which as time went on became necessities of 
civilization— flour, tea, sugar and tobacco. The boats of 
the natives, outside the timbered region of southeastern 
Alaska, were made of the skin of the gray sea lion, which 
had its rookeries at intervals along the coast. With the 
advent of Americans the sea lion became rare, great 
numbers being wantonly shot because they were big game. 
The sea otter hunt once open to all men, it was not long 
before the herd was practically exterminated, and for a 
distance of nearly 1,800 miles along the southwestern 
coast there is to-day hardly a village where the people 
•have any sure means of support. Again Professor Jordan 
urges the necessity of counting the cost before accepting 
"colonies." He says: 

"It is too late to do so when they once have been an- 
nexed. If we cannot afford to watch them, to care for 
them, to give them paternal rule when no other is pos- 
sible, we do wrong to hoist our flag over them." The 



book contains besides an article recently published In tbe 
"The Lessons of the Paris Tribunal of A rl 
.hi addrei ed before thi 

of San Francisco about a year ago entith tinu- 

ingCitv.'a letter to the editor of the Outlook anent 
"Philippine history." and still another address delivered 
before the State Normal School at San Jose, in which 
Thoreau is considered not as a naturalist, nor as an 
essayist, but as a moralist, and this in relation to Amer- 
ican politics. Against imperial or colonial dominion Pres- 
ident Jordan is opposed from principle, and all those in- 
terested in this vital question of the hour will find much 
food for thought in a careful perusal of "Imperial 
Democracy." 

f Imperial Democraoy: by David Starr Jordan. D. Appleton &Co.. Pub- 
lishers. New York. Prloe. tl.SO. 

The Solitary Those readers who appreciated and en- 
Summer, joyed tbe quiet charm of "Elizabeth and 
her German Garden," will welcome with 
pleasure "The Solitary Summer" by tbe same author. It 
is a record of five happy months idled away in the forests, 
on the plain, in the garden. "I want to be alone for a 
whole summer and get to the very dregs of life. I want 
to be as idle as I can, so that my soul may have time to 
grow," says Elizabeth. "You shall be solitary if you 
choose," answers the wise husband, "for it is always best 
to allow a woman to do as she likes, if you can, and it 
saves a good deal of bother. To have what she desires is 
generally an effective puoishment." 

So this dear little German woman sits with Walt Whit- 
man by the rose beds, takes Thoreau as a companion be- 
side the pond, potters in the garden with Goethe, and 
sheds tears over Werther, with Keats goes into the 
forests and reads Spencer beneath the pines. "What a 
blessing it is to love books," she says. "Everybody must 
love something, and I know of no objects of love that give 
such substantial and unfailing returns as books and a 
garden." 

This loveable little German Hausfrau makes the reader 
enjoy with her the procession of the months, ' the first 
three all white and yellow, and the last two gorgeous 
with the lupin fields and the blues and purples and crim- 
sons that clothe the hedges and ditches in a wonderful 
variety of shades, and dye the grass near the water in 
great patches." Nor is this delightful book without its 
lesson, which is that happiness must come from within, 
and not from without. Thus we may each, if we will, 
have within us a store more than sufficient to fill not 
alone five quiet months, but a lifetime. 

The Solitary Summer: by the author of Elizabeth aud her German Gar- 
den. The Macmillan Co., Publishers. New York. For sale by Gunning- 
ham, Curtlss & Welch. Price, $1.50. 

From Sea to Sea. Nothing shows more conclusively the 
immense hold which Kipling has 
gained upon the mind of the American reading public than 
the numerous editions of his works which are being con- 
stantly published, and the ever increasing demand for 
anything that bears his name. The Doubleday & McClure 
Co. have just issued a new edition of Rudyard Kipling's 
"From Sea to- Sea." The work is in two volumes, and 
consists entirely of sketches, letters, etc., which first saw 
, the light more than ten years ago. As the early work of 
this popular author it claims especial attention. The 
publishers state the 46,000 copies have already been sold, 
and the eager demand for it still remains unabated. 

A new fifteen-volume edition of Kipling's Complete 
Works will soon be placed on sale in the Emporium book 
department. Specimen volumes have already been re- 
ceived. They are convenient in size, well printed, and 
substantially bound in cloth. The names of the three pub- 
lishing houses which control the copyrights — the Double- 
day & McClure Co., D. Appleton & Co., and the Century 
Co. — appear on the backs of the books. H. B. Claflin & 
Co. purchased the whole edition of 20,000 sets, of which 
they retained 5,000 and sold to Boston and Chicago 5,000 
sets each. The Emporium book department of this city 
bought the remaining 5,000 sets, and it is these 75,000 
volumes that they will soon place on sale. 

Prom Sea to Sea :. by Rudyard Kipling. Doubleday & McClure Co., Pub- 
lishers, New York. For sale at The Emporium. Prioe, 2 volumes, .60. 

M. E. B. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




THERE is a rumor to tbe effect that the " indisposi- 
tion" of a very charming girl of society is the result 
of a severe fall in trying to do the backward fall seen in 

the Dancing Girl. 

* # * 

When the side lights show us the chubby-faced damsel 
who leans with confiding air upon the paternal care of 
the friendly benedict, the censorious old dame looks on, 
but in this case does not find the fault she would were tbe 
affair in other quarters. Platonics are believed in in this 
case. The elderly maiden who is so fond of cards enjoys 
Del Monte most when "the crowd" is not there, and the 
widower can come or go without comment. 

* * * 

If the war in the Philippines continues during the au- 
tumn the wives of the army officers who have gone to 
Manila are contemplating a trip over there themselves. 
It seems a young officer, recently returned on sick leave, 
gave such glowing accounts to tbe wife of a very promi- 
nent army man in that region that she has been stirring 
herself in the matter; and the report goes that Secretary 
Alger will allow a shipload of femininity to cross the raging 
main before winter sets in. 

* * * 

If Mrs. Oelrichs starts an automobile race with another 
fashionable woman in New York, it goes without saying 
that we may expect some of her enthusiastic following 
out here to emulate her example. Doubtless the auburn 
tressed demoiselle or one of tbe several sisters will be the 
first to be heard from when the auto reaches this city. 

* * # 

Some people are wondering if the recently arrived bride 
knows the majority of the women who have rushed to call 
have been dying to see tberara avis who succeeded in cap- 
turing that flirt of flirts who always — as the song says — 
"took his hat and walked away" when the climax had been 

reached. 

* # # 

It is rumored — whether fact or no we do not vouch — 
that the gav widower who prolonged his stay the other 
side (if the Rockies has sentimental reasons for doing so, 
ami that it is quite among the probabilities he may bring 

au Eastern bride with him when he returns. 

* # # 

What a glorious time the swim is goiDg to have when 

the splendid mansion now building is completed and opened 

by the popular wife of the Island capitalist; for if any one 

loves to have a good time and share it with her friends it 

is this huspitable dame. 

ii * * 

0« (lit, we may expect to hear of a wedding in the Swiss 
chateau so m after the arrival in that country of the popu- 
lar family just gone from our midst, gossip asserting that 
an engagement of several years' standing will be consum- 
mated. 

* # * 

The matron who summers at San Rafael with her many 
sons is being much sought by girls who desire an invita- 
tion to visit her there. 

* * * 

On dit, handsome Harry is captive to the charms of a 
Bakersfield lady, and gossip also asserts the sister-in-law 
is very pleased. 

PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A Sovereign Remedy. One dose will stop a cough. It never fails. 
Try it. Price, 25 cents. George Dahibendee & Co., 214 Kearny 
Btreet. For sale by all druggists. 



In times ol peace; la times of war, 
The fa\ .trite drink la Jesse Moore. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co , 746 
Market street, San Francisco. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda before breakfast. 



July 22, 1899. 



I College !»an Rafael 

I For Ydng Ladies. 

# 
* 
* 

i 

* 



,4«fcfc&«&4* j. j. 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic. 
Full colleglc court >f studies. A boarding sohool of highest 
grade. Superb m era building. Steam heated. Beautiful 
and commodious c is rooms. Musio and art rooms. 

Located In the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for b uty and healthfulness. Address, 

MOTHER SUPERIOR, 
College San Rafael. San Rafael, Oal 



V 



Irving Institute 



Select Boarding and Day 

School for young ladies 

2126 CALIFORNIA ST., S- F. 

Next session will begin ugust 7th. Accredited to the Universities. 
Seminary and Full Consei.tory of Music. Primary Department for ohtl- 
dreo. Carriage will call, 'or further information, address the Principal, 

LV. EDWARD B. CHURCH. A. M. 



EV 



m . . A . < 1 [Founded 1876.| * 

1 rinitV 3CriOOl, 3300 Washington St.' 

•* ' ban Francisco. 

Boarding and Da School for Young Men and Boys 

Prepares for Universitand College; accredited with tbe Univer- 
sity of California and land Stanford University. A Faculty of 
eleven Professors and :acbers. Boarders limited to thirty five. 
Christmas Term opens ugust 1st 

Rev. Dr. E. B. Spalding, Rector. 



H. J. STEWAtT, Mus. D. 

Has rem ed his M usic Studio to 

1406 Van Ness Avenue. 
Between Bush and Pine. 

The Solly Wa er School of Illustration 

Wil Jre-open August ;t for the fall and winter term. 

26 O'Farrell St- 

PROF. WALTER WTSON, &%£ ZT&^TJZ,?. 

Lessons private, In class, - at your residence. 

417 ELLIS STREET, S F., CAL. 

SCHOOL OF ELOCUT N, DEL8ARTE, AND VOICE CULTURE. 

Acting and Stagt'echnique. Course of 75 lessons $50. 
Zoe Rice, 4i2 McAllister reet, Department 3, San Francisco. 

SCIENTIFIC DRESS-CITING SIMPLIFIED. 

Just out; something nev wonderful tailor system of Paris, France; the 
most simple, accurate, an* apld system in the world for cutting Ladies', 
Children's, and Gent's Ga ems. First ten pupils half price. 

Muk, Coon, 504 Eddy street. S. F. 



Golden Gate 
Glottiinrj Renovajru 



. J. FISBSL. 

No. 9 Geary St., Room 16 
Telephone, Red 8721. 



Suits Cleaned and Pressed 
while you wait . 



$1.00 



Pants to order $4 UP Sis called for and delivered free. Send postal 



^TMlaTn.Tia-MlaMrijiT|fTffliB teTaCT»lteIeMWHMMWI> 




fi oncrete and 
Artificial Stone 



lgeles. 






July 22, 1899. 







lmp.rl.l Democracy. Under the well-hosen title ■, , 
Jordan, President of ffl&i^W 
has grouped together eight addressed *I)Y„ Un l v f r sity, 

the past year at different times and pl^es all h^ durin ^ 
the pohcy of the United States, espedav nni bea F ln gon 
war with Spain and its results. $&„ ° T""* the 
ism-which shall it be? is the questtanP™ ?/ Im T P er ial- 
sets before the nation, and boVS < t h P den * -° rdan 
cusses with rare ability and entire Sr^£ \ e dis " 
posing every step toward imperial sn L II gh ° P " 
reasons for which he gives as follows 6 three mai n 

"First, dominion is brute forr-p- *»r.„A j 
nations are slave nations- third t'h= ■•' de P en dent 
greater than the buildmg of empfr'es " ■%? g ° f men is 
at home must precede good government^ 3 ° ve , rDment 
the author states, and again and Si de R endenoies - 

sufficiency or isolation for isTtWs ° k ^ To 6 ThH 't 
from world movements or to drift In ,C shrmk 

alike unworthy of our orign and de L oX""^ 1 
urge: let our choice be madf with open y^s nota .l* 
delates of chance disguised as 'Manifes De'stkt ' n e 
forgetting, counting all the cost let Zw I . Un - 
Let ours be sober, fearless! prayerM chce Thpff ° n i 
republic-the imperial repu&dw^h siU it be?" P *' 
, The first lecture in the volume, "Lest WW » + , 
ts title from Kipling's "Recent" wnfc Prlld'en "jo? 
dan eulogizes as the "noblest hymn of ourcenturv^ Tho" 
second chapter is devoted to an address Ui~S J 1 " 
he Congress of Religions at OmahaTnOober 1898 and' 
"To corned a ' Ex P, ansion - I» « the aSays ' " 

Ser S e e d a is a rand^^ Pread " nk ^^SiS 
In the third paper, "A Blind Man's HoBay "President 

&?PhT^ th ? r° P ° sitionthat we Sd w thdraw 
^ffPf' Islan <3s as soon as in d-nity we can: 

Partners £ ? tatesmansbi P to make these lien people our 
,»»! toe.sj it is a crime to make them our laves " * * * 

offfemm^ '""'" **" l " ' /ne W ° re '** caienter a nati ™ 

v a w e w5L ha ^ er t , D " ColoniaI Lessons of Aldca" contains a 
I Z l,Z b J e f °V e8Son illustrating methoc to be avoided 
wTnVT?^ tt" 1 ."^ ponies. WheH OTr thirty years 
ago (18b,) the United States purchased fam Russia the 
vast territory of Alaska, rich in native nources, and a 
Population of about 32,000, they all suppoied themselves 
"••>" l .<' by hunting and fishing. The sale othe furs of the 
sea . ot er and the blue fox enabled them toprocure many 
1,1 :;«' luxuries which as time went on becan necessities of 
''nation— flour, tea, sugar and tobacco. The boats of 
we natives, outside the timbered region 1 southeastern 
Alaska, were made of the skiu of tb.ftjKy.3a lion, 
MO its rookeries at intervals along the cost 
aavent of Americans the sea *' 
numbers being wantonly shot 
"e sea otter hunt once o^^B 1 men 
Wore the herd wa — ^ 

distance of nearly 
toast there is to-d' 
«&ve any sure mei 
JfgM the nee 
Colonies, " 

"It is too 1; 

Wwd. Kwe 
«M», to gi 



FRANdSCO NEWS JJfrngL 

Philippine history " a „,f .M dltor of tkTnJ 
Democracy." gt ln a careful pe£? 

choose "„ y B •"'hzabeth «v **o«la». 
t°° T' answers th» „<• . y ou shafl! 







* a >W a^n ? d^ "^ VV^t 
m So this dear 1 fcr ' 8 ^^? 8 ^ ^I** 

feds teZ\Ct S [ »^Z7 * ^£ 
forests and »*£ Werth -er wft? d £ n *itbi 
Messing itV^^Peocer ^ f^t. 1 ^ 

love something, and T >° ks ' «be sL e , &* ^ 
such substantial O 5 know of no „??' «»mw 
garden." Ial a °d unfaili n ° . ob Ject. ,^Nr 

This loveable litt, n etUrD8 *•!!>» 

eojoy with her ti le 6 erman ff 
threiallUite*^^ 00 ^!?^^ «.»ke, „. 
with the lupin fi P u d yell °w, and *> »obh? 
sons that cfo?hSe ^ the «*£ anH ^ X 2 
variety of shades a L. d ^ es and H-? d , PornS 
peat patches? **' Zt dye the J r d '« c »e 9 I 
lesson, which is £" » this de w\ S f ?«»r ^^ 

alone five quiet mV^.^re ^ «»»y e „. 



, 



HtW 



From 



Sea to Sea. 



Nothi 



for 



>">g sho Ws 



^ 



immense ^ ■'" 
the numeWVdhtaf. °of ^ Ata S an W! ' 
stantly published aLii! 8 w °rk s tV 68 "^ 
anything that be a ;A^ d . the eve,', "S .5?" 



stantly published arJ 1 4 . B w °rks w i. eaa bi>^* 
anything that bears M dthe ^eri* h ' c « 4\ 
Co. have just issued a naiDe - Thi> ^ easi 0e I ' 
! 'Prom Sea tes" ed , a S ew editin B he .?«<blJ.J , «« 



1 new 
Th e work 



f ditior ^ aj 



K rom Sea to Sea. Ti -™ t n 

consists entirely of sketcL Wl , rk « in , ' 
the hght more than ten yea !,' Iette ''s, et > 1 
this popular author i"S Sa ^ A S V : 
publishers state the 46 oon s e SDe r - • f 
and the eager demSDtf forf f co P' es Aa, 

A new fifteen-wft«De edit; tett > 
Works will soon tiptoed oa J?, ^ In 
department. Spa* 060 vol Um * ,( > i a t?'lyn 
They sW"«i/ e0 t v ; Aa^A- 





SAJM JPRAJNCISCO NEWS JLliTTliK. 



July 22, 1899. 




THE sensitive morals of San Francisco have given 
Gotham a severe and a serious shock. Returning 
voyagers from anywhere who have passed through the 
city by the Golden Gate and tarried for a week or a 
month at your hotels, your French restaurants and swell 
private boarding-houses, find it difficult to reconcile your 
delicate sensibilities before the glare of the footlights and 
your delightfully free and easy way of living. When the 
news returned from the Coast and floated along the Rialto 
that The Turtle had been so mutilated to fit the temperate 
taste of the average San Franciscan that iis own father 
would not know it, there was a cynical sneer on the lip of 
the knowing ones, for The Turtle delighted New York for 
two hundred nights, and Boston men, matrons and 
maidens received it with open arms. Why San Francisco 
should play the prude in the face of all reports and ac- 
cepted evidence of a not too fine sense of the proprieties, 
is a situation hopelessly intricate. New York is not more 
wide open than Miss 'Frisco, certainly; and that Boston, 
the Puritanic home of corkscrew curls, spectacled pro- 
fessors, to say nothing of boasted culture and ultra-refine- 
ment, should revel in an atmosphere too fragrantly 
Frenchy for the nostrils of Pacific Coasters, disturbs the 
eternal fitness of things. We are now prepared to hear 
that your lovely city will be shocked by the sight of the 
naked truth! 

« * » 

Her fellow toilers in fields histrionic are smiling at the 
sharp ruse played by Miss Blanche Bates, now delighting 
San Francisco with her clever acting. Her solicitous in- 
terest in her future — her appeal to the gentlemen who 
know a lot about the Bible but nothing more of that 
country from whose bourne no traveler returns than 
the super, scene shifter, or heavy villain, was the 
shrewdest advertising trick recorded in an age. No lost 
diamonds; no romantic marriage or hair -breadth escapes; 
just a plain, modest question of conscience! Her denial of 
the story is a little tardy and irrelevant, for it has devel- 
oped that neat, type-written copies of her touching appeal 
to the clergymen were sent to all the newspapers, still 
wet, with the solemn query. 

* * * 

Gambling on the race track has long been a recognized 
and honorable sport among the ladies of Europe, but in 
this country there has not been the same personal free- 
dom in that direction by the ladies which obtains abroad. 
However, the fad is gaining ground here, and at the 
tracks the swell Four Hundred are more and more in evi- 
dence. Their play is usually based upon the tips of vet- 
eran sports who have succeeded in keeping themselves 
broke by backing their own judgment. The latest win- 
nings are credited to young Vanderbilt and his lovely San 
Francisco bride (for Birdie Fair prides herself on the fact 
that she is a Californian). She put half a thousand on a 
winner at odds generous enough to line her pockets with 
bills. 

* * * 

Melba is not coming to the United States next season. 
She will visit South America. She is now singing in Lon- 
don and will appear in Russia and Germany before the 
South American season. We shall greet her asain in the 
winter of 1900. 

* * * 

It is understood that Fritz Sch'eel, who is so popular in 
San Francisco, may become the leader of the Philadelphia 
Symphony Orchestra. 

it * # 

Victor Herbert is writing a new opera for Alice Neil- 
son, who is at present in the Hawaiian Islands. 

Nero York, July 17, 1890. PASSE-PARTOUT. 

One cannot love too muoh of a good thing— Napa Soda, for instance. 



Use Allen's Foot-Ease in Your Gloves 



A lady 

writes 



'• I shake Allen's Foot-Ease into my gloves and 
It saves my gloves by absorbing perspiration, 
powder." Allen's Foot-Ease makes tight or new 
it to Break in New Shoes. It keeps the feet cool 
vite the attention of physicians and nurses to the 
Foot-Ease All drug and shoe stores sell it, 25c. 
Address Allen S. 



rub a little on my hands. 
It is a most dainty toilet 
shoes easy. Always use 
and comfortable. We in- 
absolute purity of Allen's 

Sample sent FREE. 
Olmsted, Le Roy, N. Y. 



DURANGO, MEXICO, July 21, 1899* 

To the Superintendent of the Foundry Department ; 

DEAR SIR : We desire to establish a general agency in 
San Francisco, and it will give us pleasure and you satisfac- 
tion to allow us to express to you a sample keg of hundred 
kilos of our new Ferro-Nickel Manganese Calcium Fluoride 
for trial in cupola and ladle use. 

This alloy, like yeast, not an expensive article, gives new life 
to the metal in purity, ductility and softness. 

Upon receipt of this, please telegraph at once to our exclus- 
ive Sole Agents, Messrs. Stahlknecht y Cia., Bankers, 
Durango, Mexico, for a trial sample keg alloy, which we will 
be pleased to forward to you immediately by Wells, Fargo y 
Cos. Express direct to your foundry, 

Awaiting your immediate reply, we are your faithful servants, 

THE NATIONAL ORE & REDUCTION CO- 
Durango, Mexico- P. O. Box 83 

RII^IIMP^S THAMTP H vou can invest $50 000 in a 
OUOI M L.OO VllrtllVL. Mexican manufactured new 

patented product which has 
now unlimited sales with no competition in America It will return to 
you 30 per oent Interest hrst six months, with a permanent official position 
for a business man. The National Ore & Reduction Co. 

Harvey Kline, Secretary (Mention 8 F. Newe Letter). Durango, Mexico 

Mining Machinery •■«« supplies 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 
Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill 
Bartlett Concentrating Table 
James Ore Feeder 
Roger Improved Crushing Rolls 
Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers 
Two and Three Stamp Mills 
Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps 
Wood-Working and Iron- Working Machinery 

PARKE & LACY CO., 21 and 23 Fremont Street, 8. F. 

JOSEPH FIQEL, MERCHANT TAILOR 

2d Floor Flood Building. Entrance Room 5. 



FIRST- 
CLASS 
CUSTOM 
TAILORING 
AT 

MODERATE 
COST. 



This is an invitation to accurate dressers — men 
who have been paying $50 to $65 for bnsineas suits 
— to look over our assortment of fancy cheviots and 
worsteds that we're making up from 130 to $50. 
It's quite an item, isn't it, to save $15 on a suit? 
Depend on being properly fitted, on correot styles 
and on excellent workmanship. 



There's a splendid assortment of trouserings, too. 



Hugh a, boyle 



(C. A. Helmquisx, Cutter). 



FINE 



TAILORING 



Room 9 Flood Building 
San Francisco. 



Johanm 




As a table water is unsurpassed. 

—London Hospital Oazetie. 



July 2i, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




"Hear Itae Crier?" "What the devil art thou!" 
"One that will play the devil, sir. with you." 

NO surprise Deed be expressed that the Rev. J. A. B. 
Wilson does not believe that an actress can enter the 
Kingdom of Heaven. The pulpiteer trusts the theory of 
damnation, believing that there is but one way to secure 
eternal salvation, and that through the door of his own 
particular church and contribution box. Sanctimonious 
faces go with sanctimonious hearts, according to gentle- 
men of the cloth. To hold the mirror up to nature on the 
stage, adorn the tale of life, and portray its heartbreaks, 
passions, and errors, and carve its moral in the memory, 
is forsooth the merry mission of the pulpit ! This is the 
creed of the reverend Wilson. The many charities of the 
profession, its mutual sympathies, and its gracious per- 
sonalities, give an eternal negative to the cant which 
croaks perdition to men and women who made the "play 
the thing." 

SDVERTISEMENTS in the daily papers announce that 
men will be carried to Cape Nome, Alaska, for rea- 
sonable rates. It is a novel idea — this invitation to pay 
something for the privilege of being starved to death. 
The baldest fake ever perpetrated in the frozen zone is 
this Cape Nome fraud. Any man who pays his good coin 
to be carried there can do the job more neatly, econom- 
ically, and with greater expedition, by the purchase and 
use of a little prussic acid; and monoxide of gas costs but 
a trifle. There are a hundred ways of crossing the Styx 
more agreeable than the Cape Nome route. 

THAT beautiful California girl who violated her lover's 
wishes and recently went bathing at Atlantic City, 
seeking to appease his wrath by wearing a mask, met 
with the same success attending a similar experience of 
an ostrich when pursued. Despite the mask her shapely 
limbs were very much in evidence. The charming, creature 
showed a refreshing innocence truly worthy the modesty 
of the Golden State. Her apprehensive and jealous lover 
was probably more concerned as to the length of her suit 
than he was regarding the covering of her face, and failed 
to consider brevity to be the soul of wit. 

COUNTY Clerk Deane will evidently have to put his 
$175 per month clerks at work. The Supreme Court 
has refused to listen to his plea for more money. Poor 
fellows! From 8:30 a. m. until 4 p. m., with but an hour 
for luncheon. How many far more competent men are 
there in private business offices in San Francisco who 
work ten hours every day, with a Sunday now and then 
thrown in to make good measure, for fifty dollars less. 
Let Mr. Daane cut the G-ordian knot by cutting down 
large salaries and employing more men. Why not accept 
the mercantile scale? 

THE gentlemen who conduct the Napa Insane Asylum 
are modest enough to deny with indignation the in- 
famous charges made against their management of that 
institution. It was not to have been expected that they 
would acknowledge them. The circumstantial character 
of the evidence is quite sufficient to justify a more search- 
ing investigation than is likely to be made. Unfortunately 
insane patients are too much like dead men; they tell no 
legal tales. 

THE discovery has again been made that the plumbing 
at the City and County Hospital is bad. The plumbing 
at the City Hall is literally rotten. The thieving in this 
particular at the City Hall is beyond belief. That disease 
and death do not carry off many of those who are steadily 
employed there demonstrates the fact that the man who 
can successfully endure the political air of San Francisco 
has not much to fear from sewer gas. 



1 not shiver in 

the "swirling" fogs that sweep fi 
evening if Colonel Summers will regard the n.> 
him by General Shafter. The overcoats are here and may 
be had for the asking. No one can blame the soldier* for 
wanting to save their money. They brought back "imi 
overcoats, and want to return them to the department 
quartermaster here. The howl sent up by the Examiner 
has no more truth in it than its claim of sincerity and truth 
in other matters. Veracity is not found in the lexicon of 
that corrupt vehicle of misinformation. 

OREGON volunteers, 400 strong, were guests of the 
Orpheum Monday night. One of the players asked it 
we should retain the Philippines. Four-fifths of the boys, 
rising in their seats, yelled "No." The raucous tones of 
stay-at-home expansionists who demand that American 
civilization and liberty shall be shot and sabered into the 
coffee-colored natives of Luzon should take note of this 
message from men who have smelled gun powder at 
the front. It is very easy to let the other fellow stop the 
bullets in an unjust cause. Even a Filipino would find it 
difficult to hit a man 7,000 miles away. 

MARRIAGE by pistol, rather than by other means of 
persuasion, may be more pointed, but it has its little 
drawbacks. There is an ex parte atmosphere about the 
presence of a rapid-fire gun in the hands of an enraged 
parent at the marriage feast not calculated to prolong 
love's young dream. A Santa Rosa judge has just de- 
clared that a Justice of the Peace, an urgent bride, and a 
pistol are not legally competent to commit matrimony. 
Perhaps in cases of this kind it would be better to use 
the pistol first and have the ceremony performed after- 
wards. 

FROSECUTING-Attorney Joacbimsen should resign his 
position and turn his attention to sackcloth and ashes 
and law school. It was proved in Justice Treadwell's 
court last Thursday that he did not know how to draw a 
complaint for vagrancy that would hold water — or men. 
A precious quartette of vagabonds were let loose because 
his ex- honor had not the skill or the care to draw a legal 
document which would make the punishment fit the crime. 
Is it for this he draws his monthly salary? Much learn- 
ing hath not made him mad. 

1WT ARTIN KELLY, a distinguished Republican states- 
l_ 1 man for revenue, with reputation over- valued at one 
American dollar, went on a plain, ordinary, civilian drunk 
one day this week and smashed a dozen fine bar glasses. 
One of the remarkable spectacles of the political situation 
is the character of the party leaders. That honest and 
intelligent citizens will permit themselves to be led by 
their noses in the rear of the malodorous quartette now 
manipulating the political vineyard is a loud-smelling and 
disreputable paradox. 

POLITICS make strange bedfellows almost as fre- 
quently as does matrimony. One short year ago the 
Examiner was holding up the Honorable Samuel Rainey 
as fit companion of the hopelessly sin-saturated and mor- 
ally putrescent. No doubt the Examiner spoke truly: — if 
there were ever any occasion for doubt, final and over- 
whelming proof has been fully established by a natural 
political combination. The most recent companionship of 
Mr. Rainey is alleged to exist in the person of Mr. Andrew 
Lawrence. 

THE lady of Santa Barbara whose love for her present 
husband was so great that she joyously permitted 
him to bore holes in her teeth and plug them with gold in 
order that she might bask in his smiles, has given proof 
of her affection and idiocy of which there are few equals. 
Her liege lord, now languishing in jail on a charge of 
bigamy, need have no fear when emerging from confine- 
ment that the woman will be gone. Had he accumulated 
ten instead of two wives, this love, so profound that it 
yearned for the operating chair, would not be interfered 
wtth. 

RECENT discoveries at San Quentin lead one to con- 
clude that the prisoners are largely engaged in the 
manufacture of scalping knives, and the smuggling of 
opium has become one of the protected industries of that 
exclusive institution. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1899. 




" We obey no wana but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

ST last we have two first-class dramatic companies, at 
two theatres in this city, doing first-class business at 
first-class prices. The Frohmans at the Columbia and 
the Frawleys at the California. As comparisons are pro- 
verbially odious, we shall not cavil about pre-eminence, 
but pat our sides and be thankful to the gods for their 
gracious gifts. Dan Frawley has brought us our own 
Blanche Bates. As Californians we feel a certain pride in 
the success Blanche Bates has made in the East. New 
York accepted her in the belief that she was nurtured on 
London fogs, and when it discovered that she was a Cali- 
fornian product, the greeting lost none of its heartiness. 
The New Yorkers have accepted many a precious Cali- 
fornian, from Bret Harte down to Frank Norris, and 
Blanche Bates was merely an addition to the brilliant 
coterie. But it seemed strange to the prejudiced New 
Yorkers that California could turn out good dramatic 
talent. 

We should, therefore, be thankful to those who have 
conquered the East, for they are pioneers who paved the 
way for others. Personally I feel grateful to Dan Fraw- 
ley for bringing Blanche Bates to us. That he should be 
harassed by adverse criticism for matters over which he 
had no control, bespeaks bad taste on the part of his 
critics. That he is not running opposition to Frohman 
must be obvious to the meanest understanding. First of 
all, he does not possess the plays to do this successfully. 
Secondly, he has not such choseu people as Frohman has 
sent us in the Miller company. Obviously Mr. Frawley is 
merely doing what thousands of others do in other branches 
of business — trying to make a living and some money 
legitimately. To do this he has chosen the best means at 
his command. He has brought here Blanche Bates, 
Augustus Cook, Al Hickman, and several others, and he 

does a splendid business. 

* * # 

I cannot say that I like The Dancing Girl much; nor that 
Blanche Bates does herself justice in this play. I cannot 
say that she carries out the idea that an actress can be a 
Christian, when she lends herself to the portrayal of such 
a character as the Dancing Girl. An unnatural daughter, 
who boasts of the vileness she practices against her aged 
father. A mocker of the holiest human sentiments. A 
prostitute so utterly lost that she prefers a life of sin to 
that of becoming an honorable wife. Faithless, soulless, 
ungrateful. There is absolutely nothing to redeem the 
tension of horror this monster infuses. As an histrionic 
educational object lesson it works for all that is evil in 
the feminine heart. The play is neither artistic nor 
piquant. It is simply prurient and vulgar. And Blanche 
Bates' passion makes it thoroughly unwholesome. A very 
strong character in the play is the Quaker, David Ives. 
Augustus Cook played the original character with 
Sotbern, and a better man for the part does not walk the 
boards. Alfred Hickman as Reginald Slingsby, the man 
who asks everybody's advice whether he should "do it," 
reminded me very much of James Lindsay ia The Liars, 
who "did it," but wanted to know how to manage. Of 
the others in the play: Miss Hope Ross is very promising. 
She is a dignified little person, and dresses in exquisite 
taste. Why Aminoff was rung in to play Poniatowsky; 
why such a character should have been introduced, and 
for what purpose, is a matter for which Mr. Harry Arthur 
Jones will have to answer to His Majesty the Pit. To me 
it seems more foolish than funny. For the great Ponia- 
towsky, who is supposed to be a violinist, does not even 
know how to hold his violin as he dashes from somewhere 



to somewhere. That the world ever had a band of idiots 
such as those who ran after the long-haired idiot, is hard 
to believe, even when attested by Mr. Harry Arthur 
Jones. Blanche Bates' falling down the stairs was much 
better than her listening to the "curse." She looked 
David Ives straight in the face, listening as if expecting 
and knowing the words that he would utter, which robbed 
the scene of spontaneity and force. The words of David 
Ives should have made her cower and hide her head; it 
should have appeared as if every utterance had a crush- 
ing effect. Her wild demonstration after her father had 
gone would then have been so much more effective. I 
have a strong suspicion that Blanche Bates keeps up arti- 
ficial strength. She seems to be overworked. 

* * * 

With the exception of the music, Olivette, Audran's 
merry opera, there is little that is old in the libretto as 
presented at the Grand Opera House. Wolff, the great 
and only Wolff, was excruciatingly funny as Coquielcot. 
Wooley, who is an artist in the line of "make-up," was 
excellent. Persse, whom I would always rather hear 
in grand opera, sang and acted with much spirit. Goff, 
too, was not bad, though that sort of work does not seem 
to be in his line. Miss Mason is an all-round artist. Hattie 
Belle Ladd was evidently suffering from an overdose of 
Carmen. She showed up beautifully in red tights, but not 
any better than Edith Mason, who appeared for the first 
time in blue adorables. Miss Mindel Dryfuss danced very 
well, though I should advise a drop or two of ginger ex- 
tract to give her words a little more snap. Be not so 
sad, Mindel, Dryfuss is all right. The chorus was — as 
ever — incomparable. Speaking of the Morosco chorus, I 
must say a word about Mr. Jones, the man who works in- 
cessantly to make these girls perfect in their line. It was 
he who selected crude San Francisco girls and made of 
them artists. He never for a moment loses sight of them 
while they are on the stage, and they accord him uncondi- 
tional obedience, not unmixed with love and respect; for 
they are alive to the fact that he is a rare master, and 
that he wants excellence for their own good. 

• # # 

Was there ever such a sight as Pruette in Blue Beard 
at the Tivoli? He plays the coy maiden in the merry bur- 
lesque, and such a maiden ! A ton of white flesh in a few 
yards of blue silk. And those lovely, dimpled arms with 
the spasmodically-fisted hands, ready to knock out the 
unwilling lover. It is a sight that nightly crowds the 
Tivoli. As an interlude to grand opera, the burlesques 
fill up time pleasantly and profitably, and there are thou- 
sands who smile with Mrs. Kreling. 

Adolphb Danziqer. 



The Orpheum management will next week present an 
almost entirely new bill. Laura Joyce Bell & Co. will ap- 
pear in the old English comedietta, Wig and Govm, a 
sparkling little production pleasantly associated with 
memories of Rosina Vokes. Mrs. Bell has earned an en- 
viable name in comic opera comedy roles and other 
branches of the legitimate. Her appearance on the vaude- 
ville stage is of comparatively recent date, but, like every- 
thing else she has undertaken, she has made a big success 
of it. Herr Von Palm, the German nobleman with a hobby 
for designing spectacular dances, and who invented the 
"mirror" dance for La Loie Fuller and the "fire" dance 
for Papinta, will produce his latest artistic creation, "The 
Lotus Flower." The dance has been entrusted to La 
Fafalla, who created a big sensation with it throughout 
the East. It will be produced under the personal super- 
vision of Herr Von Palm. Elizabeth Murray, the famous 
story teller, will make her first appearance on the Or- 
pheum stage. As an entertainer, she is said to have few 
equals. The Phoites will return after an absence of over 
three years. Tbey will present a new and original comic 
trick pantomime, entitled Flip, Flap, Flop. The Eldridges, 
"past masters of colored comedy," as they style them- 
selves, will give Orpheum patrons an opportunity to judge 
of their right to such distinguished title. Of this week's 
bill but three features will be retained — Kilpatrick & Bar- 
ber, the sensational scientific and trick bicycle riders, Min- 
nie Palmer, in specialties, and Les Browns, the one- 
legged male and female acrobats and instrumentalists. 



Jnly ts, 1899. 



TKR 



.■.. 



Although the burlesque of HI 
business at the Tivo'.i, it will t«- pl»red for 
Sunday night. Nrx: »r. 
season of comic opera at the T. 
revival of the famous opera W,mg, one of ' 
ce s aca in the history of the house, and in which 
Stevens will make his last appearai 
paratory to joining Henry Miller. 
the Tivoli. it drew crowded houses and it 
to again attract large audiences. It will be mounted on a 
•i scale, and the entire company will appear. 

On Monday evening, July 31st, the Tivoli will inaugurate 
a season of grand opera at popular prices, which pn 
to eclipse anything of the kind ever seen in the city. The 
operas will be "grand" in every respect, and in addition 
to many notable singere engaged, the chorus and 01 
tra will be enlarged. The sopranos will be Signorinas 
Ella Prosnitz, Anna Lichter. Mary Linck. Inez Dean; the 
tenors are Signors Ferdinand Avedano, Vincenzn Foneari, 
and Baron Berthald; the baritones are Signors Guadenzio 
Sallasa, Quinto Zani and William Mertens; and the Bassos 
are Signors G. S. Wanrell and William Schuster. Many 
of the artists are well known here, while others come 
direct from recent triumphs in Europe. Among the operas 
to be sung are, Olelln, Tlte Junes*, Lohengrin, 
Lucia, Faust, Trovatore, Huguenots, Don Juan, William Till. 
ilieria Rusticana, Rom-o and Juliet, Manon Letcaul, 
Barber of Seville and Fidelia, which has never been sung 
in this city. The openingopera will be Aid a and the cast 
will be an exceptional one. 

To-morrow evening The New Magdalen will be given its 
closing performance at the Alcazar, and Faust will follow. 
It will be the farewell week of Lewis Morrison, and very 
probably the last time that venerable star will be seen on 
the Coast in Goethe's immortal play. For sixteen years 
has he reigned supreme in the role of Mephisto, and both 
his name and the play have always been identified to- 
gether. The Alcazar management will surround Mr. Mor- 
rison with all of the effects necessary for the production 
of the play on a scale of elegance unequalled heretofore by 
any star. The cast will be carefully selected from the 
pick of the Alcazar players, and with the creator of 
Mephisto in his role, Florence Roberts playing Marguerite, 
and Faust well up in the trained bands of White Whittle- 
sey, an artistic presentation can be assured. 

On Monday evening Madame Sans Gene will follow The 
Dancing Girl at the California. Sardou's great historical 
drama has only been seen here once, and then Kathryn 
Kidder, who at that time was at the height of her fame, 
produced it at the Baldwin Theatre, while just across the 
street Blanche Bates, at the Columbia, was tasting the 
first sweetness of success in The Wife. Since that time, 
Miss Bates has made such advancement in her profession 
that now she is rated as one of America's greatest living 
actresses. Monday night will give a splendid opportunity 
for the old playgoers and critics to compare her with Kid- 
der and see for themselves on what substantial grounds 
her reputation is founded. Blanche Bates could not possi- 
bly have chosen another play which would have given her 
the rare opportunities to display what she is really capa- 
ble of as the one which she will appear in on Monday 
night. 

But four weeks of the Miller season at the Columbia 
Theatre remain to be played, and it is with regret that 
this announcement will be read by lovers of all that is best 
in the presentation of the higher strata of the drama. 
The first, and but the first of these four, beginning with 
Monday night, will be devoted to a revival of that most 
charming of all romantic comedies, Heartsease, to which 
San Francisco was introduced at the Baldwin Theatre last 
year by Henry Miller. 

At the Grand Opera House Gounod's Faust will be given 
a superb production. Edith Mason will appear as 
Marguerite, which the Eastern press declare to be her 
greatest effort. Hattie Belle Ladd will be happily cast 
as Siebel; and as Dame Martha, Bertha Ricci will be in her 
element. Thomas H. Persse will as Faust present a role 
in which he has been most warmly commended by the press 
of New York, Philadelphia and Boston. William Wolff 
will be the Mephisto and all who saw him in it assert that 



• gem; 






«3 

"ply in 



TH1 Manila Hay. Market, 

••. This fact 
ight out during I a large number 

of the Oregon V irbo have just returned from 

stands. They all are enthusiastic in their praises of 
the fidelity and life of the scenes portrayed, and declare 
the panorama to be in every respect an amazingly accurate 
copy n( the original. 

At Cafe Zloksnd the best supper is always served, and an excell- 
ent m >Uren the very latcit and choicest selections. 
After the theatre the eatc is crowded with delighted people. 

A place o[ interest for visitors is the (lump Art Oallery of Paint- 
ings, by Kuropean masters. No. 113 Geary street. 

Fob biliousness, constipation, torpid liver, sallow skin, use Baldwin's 
Health Tablets. Ferry Ding store. 8 Market street. 



When your stomach reels like an extinct crater, tho morning after, oall 
lor Jackson's Napa Soda. 

Al——- T"L J_ Fred Belasco, Lessee. Mark Thall, 

ICaZaf" I rteatre. Manager. 'Phone Main 2M. 

Week of July 24th. Re appearance and farewell week of LEWIS 
MORRISON, In his oreated character of Mephisto, In a gor- 
geous scenic spectacle of 

FAUST. 



Florence Roberts as Marguerite 
Scale of Admission: )5o. 25c., 35c 
Next: ROMEO 1c JULIET. 



50c 



Columbia Theatre, 



Gottlob, Marx & Co., 

Lessees and Managers. 



Seventh week of the season; only six nights; matinee Satur- 
day only. 

HENRY MILLER 

and 

A SPECIAL COMPANY 
in a superb revival of the charming romantic comedv, 

HEARTSEASE. 
Next production— H d mlbt. 



California Theatre. 



S. H. FKIEDL4NDER, 



Manager. 



Tremendous success of Miss Blanche Bates and Company o 
players. Houses crowded at every performance. Commencing 
with Monday evening July 24th, T Daniel Frawley will present 
Miss Blanche Bates in Sardou's masterpiece, 

MADAME SANS GENE. 

Reserved seats, 25c, 50c, 75o., and $1. Matinee prices: 25c, 

50c, 75c 

Monday, July 31— London Asburancb. 



Gj /"\ lj Morosco Amusement Co., Ii 

rand Wpera rlOUSe. Lessees . Telephone, Main 



Morosco Amusement Co., Inc, 
" 53- 
Week of Monday, July 24th. 

FAUST {Tn English) 
Cast: 'Faust," Thomas H. Persse: "Mephisto." William 
Wolff; "Valentine." Winifred Goff; ' Wngner," Arthur Wooley; 
"Siebel," Hattie Belle Ladd; "Dame Martha," Bertha Rlooi; 
"Marguerite." Bertha Ficcl and kaith Mason, 
Our new prices— Orchestra, reserved. 35 and 50o. ; Dress Cirole, 
reserved 25c; Family Circle, reserved, 15o.; Gallery, lOo. 
Matinee Saturday . Best seat in the house, 25o, 



Tivoli Opera House- 



Mrs. Ernestine khelino, 

Proprietor and Manager. 



Orpheunrv 



Last performances of the great and gorgeous burlesque, BLUE 
BEARD- This afternoon and evening and Sunday night. 
Next week, a sumptuous production of the best of comic operas, 

WANG. 

Last appearances of Edwin Stevens. Finish of the 20th Tivoli 

Season. 

Extra -Monday, July 3lst, Opening of the Grand Opera 

Season- Famous singers, superb orchestra, and chorus, and 

stage settings. Watch for full particulars in a few days. 

Popular Prices : 25o. and 50o. Our telephone, Bush 9. 

San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell St. 
between Stookton and Powell streets. 

FIVE NEW ATTRACTIONS. 

Laura Joyce Bell & Co., in the old English comedietta, '■ Wig 
and Gown"; La Fafalla, in Herr "Von Palm's latest speotaoular 
dance, ' The Lotus Flower"; ThePhoites. in new and original 
pantomime, "Flip, Flap, Flop"; Elizabeth Murray, oomedienne 
and mimic extraordinary : the Eldridgos, past masters of col- 
ored comedy; Kilpatrick & Barber, Minnie Palmer & Co., Les 
Browns. 

Reserved seats 25o; balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats 
50o. Matinees Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1899. 




<Efat&rxuJ-?E:i//£tf 



The Hawaiian Gazette of June 30tb, arrived 
Can This by last mail, publishes an editorial which puts 
Be So ? rather a new phase on the situation in the 
market for sugar stocks. We regret that 
limited space forbids the reproduction of the article in full. 
It throws light upon the original intentions of the island 
promoters, who depended in a large measure for a more 
substantial financial backing from San Francisco capital- 
ists than it appears they have obtained. It seems that 
while the people in the dependency were quite willing to 
take up some ten millions of stock in the new corporations, 
they had not money enough at command to meet the in- 
evitable assessments. They bought on the theory that 
prices must advance, without considering the contingencies 
involved as thoroughly as they might, and failed to adopt 
the proper method of interesting outside capital. The 
Gazette says to do this successfully the only sound scheme 
would have been to educate the people of the Pacific Coast 
to invest in the properties. The monied men here should 
have been invited and persuaded, if it took many months 
to do so, to come into the new plantations on "bottom 
figures." "As it is," it goes on to say, "thousands of capi- 
talists and money-lending institutions on the Coast know 
nothing about these properties. They refuse to purchase 
them, and, what is of much more serious consequence, re- 
fuse to lend money on them. Capitalists, as a rule, are 
timid when they are ignorant of conditions. The develop- 
ment of the new plantations should have been gradual, and 
the most liberal terms made with the people of the Main- 
land. This safe, wholesome, and reasonable course would 
have avoided these 'short cuts' to quick fortunes, which 
in the end, as all experience shows, are only paths through 
financial graveyards in which the unfortunate dead lie 
thickly buried. In attempting to do too much at first, in 
making bricks with straw, the community has not been as 
wise as it should have been. To say this, however, is only 
to repeat the experience of every commercial community. 
The real values of the plantations is one thing. To edu- 
cate foreign investors so that they will have confidence 
and invest in them is quite a different matter." This is a 
rather different story from that told here by manipulators, 
who would lead one to believe that the monied classes were 
hungry to load up with these shares. There is some differ- 
ence, too, evidently in regard to "bottom figures," as the 
basis of an investment. Most of the schemes introduced 
on the local market were set up at prices which would in- 
dicate large and profitable going concerns. People of 
sense naturally fight shy of an education which costs such 
a high figure, especially when the "promoter" is brought 
too prominently into the foreground to develop the very 
natural suspicion that he is not there for the benefit of 
his health. Under such conditions it is useless for the 
Island people to expect much financial aid in this quarter, 
where investors in high-priced speculations are not in- 
clined to gamble much in a game controlled by any well 
recognized clique of operators. The small fry may jump 
at the gilded bait, but the large fish scrutinize it very 
closely, with little chance of landing them high and dry on 
the first nibble. The few speculators who did get hooked 
are now awaiting like their friends in the Islands for the 
much-promised boom which is to make their fortunes. This 
happy issue is still something to be looked forward to in 
the future. 

The oil fever is rapidly becoming epi- 

Wanted, an demic in this city, and scarcely a day 

Oil Exchange, passes without one or more companies 

being added to the already long list of 
incorporations formed to exploit lands m the central 
counties of the State. The boom has proved a godsend 
for innumerable holders of desert tracts who were land- 
poor in the full sense of the term. Of course thousands of 
acres taken up by company promoters are not worth a 
cent more to-day than they ever were; still, as an expert 
in the oil business remarked the other day, the wildcatting 
process may by accident serve to open up some new fields 
of importance, and the end will then justify the means. It 



is difficult at present to separate the wheat from the 
chaff in the selection of an investment, and this in itself 
will afford all the old-time schemers a good chance to get 
back in harness. There has not been any opportunity for 
some time past to rob the public on wildcat shares, but 
the men still survive in our midst who know all about this 
system of operation, and they can be depended upon to 
show up in due time. Their names attached to a pros- 
pectus should be sufficient warning to investors, who 
might as well count their money lost the moment it passes 
out of their hands for shares. A number of the new con- 
cerns with substantial backing are already at work sink- 
ing wells, and within a few months the output of oil in 
California will be a new and prominent factor in swelling 
the annual revenues of the State. To give interest to the 
business some effort should be made to foster speculation 
in the oil shares, and if none of the local Stock Exchanges 
care to take them up, an independent organization in the 
proper hands would meet with good support from the 
public, provided the manipulators were up in their busi- 
ness. It will give some life to the town, and assist in 
raising the capital necessary to carry on work by the sale 
of stock set aside for the purpose. 

The boomers for the Klondike and 

Klondike Boomers the Northern transportation com- 

At Work Again. panies are at work again, and the 

annual arrival of millions is announced 
in a high key, which simmer down eventually into thous- 
ands when the year's statistics appear from the Superin- 
tendent of the Mint. The same old weather-worn yarns 
are reeled off for the benefit of tenderfeet, who do not 
seem to enthuse over-much, however. Out of the 133 pas- 
sengers arriving here by steamer during the week, some 
thirteen were heeled with gold. The minority are cred- 
ited with furnishing the data upon which the rosy esti- 
mates are based; the others tell a different tale, which, 
possibly, is as much overdrawn on their side, as it cer- 
tainly is on the other. If every steamer does bring gold 
from the North, it also brings a host of apostles to preach 
against emigration to the Northern gold fields, so that 
the proselytizing efforts of the "boomers" are badly handi- 
capped. There is a happy medium between the reports 
of successful miners and those of the calamity howlers, 
which, when arrived at, is in itself suggestive of caution. 
Short of travel to the Klondike, the transportation people 
should take cognizance of the possibilities now offering for 
a rush in the direction of the latest phenomenal gold dis- 
coveries in Ashanti. News from there has been particu- 
larly cheerful of late, if dispatches can be accepted as 
correct. 

During the week the position of Sup- 
New Mining Chief erintendent of Con. -Cal.- Virginia, left 
for Con. -Virginia vacant by the death of Mr. Kervin, 

was filled by the appointment of 
Joseph R. Ryan, who for same time past has had charge 
of Hale & Norcross and Andes. Mr. Ryan is a man of 
first-class ability in every respect, and deservedly popu- 
lar both here and at Virginia City. His selection for the 
position gives general satisfaction. At the same time, 
H. Holman, for many years foreman of Con -Cal. -Virginia, 
was appointed superintendent of Best & Belcher, Gould 
& Curry, and Utah. 

In a few days more an announcement 

Cheap Power will be made of the selection of a 

On the Comstock. proposition to furnish cheap power 

on the Comstock in the form of elec- 
tricity. The introduction of electrical power on the Com- 
stock will work a revolution in the working of the mines 
along the entire length of the lode, and the water problem 
can then be considered definitely settled beyond question. 
Working the deep levels can then proceed without danger 
of interruption, and lively times should again be in order 
at Virginia City. 

The National The recently-passed National Bank- 

Bankruptoy Law ruptcy law will not do. It cannot be 

Wants Mending, worked successfully and is virtually a 

premium on fraudulent insolvency. It 

hung fire in Congress for many years, debtor States being 

afraid that its proposals would conduce to the payment of 

honest debts. So strongly was this feeling manifested on 

several occasions that it became plain that no honest bill 



July 22, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO M ITBR. 



would be passed, and those who favored one practically 
<l from the contest. Then every fellow had a whack 
at it, with the intention of making it the absurd thing it is. 
It continues in force the various tables of exemptions from 
execution found to exist in the different States when the 
act passed. In California everything that a man can own 
is exempt, except real estate, and if the assignee can find 
any part of 16000 worth of that, he is bound to set it aside 
as a homestead for the bankrupt. Better no bankruptcy 
act at all than that No assignee, referee, clerk, or other 
official is paid an adequate fee for anything done under the 
act, and consequently little or nothing is done. To meet 
this state o' affairs, a conference of the referees appointed 
to administer the act, is to be held on the 26th of this 
month at Chicago. The objects of the meeting are to de- 
vise a uniform method of procedure, especially in regard 
to exemptions, to consider what changes, if any, art- 
needed in the prevailing system, and to make such recom- 
mendations to Congress as will simplify the law and 
strengthen its provisions. The conclusions of these offi- 
cials ought to be of great use both to Congress and to the 
courts charged with bankruptcy cases. Of course, a great 
deal will depend upon whether the debtor States want 
honest bankruptcy laws or not. 

Following are the transactions on the 
Stock and Bond Stock and Bond Exchange for the 
Quotations. week beginning July 14th and ending 
July 20th. 

MISCELLANEOUS BONDS. SALES 

D. S. (Coupons) i% 600 ® 112J£ 

Contra Costa Water 5?; 3,000 © 109 

Market Street IstCons. Mortgage 5% 21,000 @ 116i<-118X 

Nor. Pactflo Coast Railway 5% 1,000 @ lie 

Northern Ry of Cal 5% 2,000 (». 1K-114K 

Oakland Transit Co. Ki 20,000 @ 109 U0J4 

S. F & S. J. V. Ry 5% 111.000 @ 116 

So Pacific of Arizona 6% 5,000 cg> 112 

s. v. w. w. 6% a.ooo <a no«-ii6 

4% 10,000 @ 101X-104K 

STOCKS. 
Water. Shares 

Contra Costa Water 2,380 

Spring Valley Water 266 

Gas and Electric. 

Equitable Gas 300 

Mutual Electric 7S 

Pacific Lighting II 5 

Gas and Electric 350 

Street Railroads. 

Market Street 410 

Powders. 

Giant 640 

Vlgorit 30 

Sugar Stocks. 

HanaP.Co 275 

Hawaiian C & S Co 80 

Hutchinson S Plantation Co. . . 415 

Kllauea 3. Plantation Co 35 

Makaweli 755 

Onomea PI . 110 

Paauhau SP Co.... 1,235 

Miscellaneous. 

Alaska Paokers Association. ... 75 

Oceanic S S Co ... 310 

Bankof California 25 297% 

The transactions during the week amounted to 8,071 shares and 
74,500 bonds, as against 8,075 shares and 108,000 bonds of the 
previous week. 

On Thursday, July 20th, the Contra Costa Water Co. held its 
stockholders' meeting, at which the former resolutions were ratified, 
audit is rumored that a monthly dividend of 35 cents will be de- 
clared shortly. On the strength of this favorable outlook for the 
company the stock rose to 75%. 

The business during the week has been light, probably owing to 
the large number of people still out of town. 

It is again rumored that the Paauhau dividend will be increased 
to 35 cents in August, and the excellent condition of the company 
warrants such increase at any time. Oas & Electric stock has been 
little traded in during the week. 



Highest. 
75X 
102 



1514 

40M 
71 X 



61X 



74 



Lowest. 
73* 
101 a 

4% 
15 
40 
69 Jf 

W>% 

71 



UK 


17% 


99H 


95 


33X 


33H 


30 


3" 


47» 


4796 


40V4 


40 


40K 


39% 


115 


115 


91S£ 


90% 




71 



A ''of all the writing machines 

v -. permanently in use at the 

(J California State Capitol are 



Remington 

Standard Typewriters 



Absolutely Reliable Always 



WYCK0FF, SEAMANS & BENEDICT. 211 Montgomory St., San Francisco. 



* • • , f 

* You cannot diminish drunkenness without diminishing * 

<*> crime, insanity, pauperism, and taxes 

* All this is done by * 



The 



f^EELEY 
Institutes 



At 1170 Market 
street, Donohoe 
Building, S. P. 



s 

A 
& 
& 

s 

$ Or Carson City, Nevada 






Auction Sale 

of Standard, 
Rare, and . . 
Fine .... 

BOOKS 

Monday, 
Tuesday and 
Wednesday, 
JULY 24, 25, and 26 



AT 



WILLIAM 



DOXEY'S 



At the Sign of the Lark. 
631 Market Street, 5, F. 

Catalogue upon application 
Mr. Doxey visits London in 
August to purchase his fall 
stock, and will be pleased to 
accept commissions to look up 
any rare books that may bj 
specially desired. 



I 



An Enormous Industry 
Our enormous facilities, tremendous output, rapid movement of 
goods always fresh in the hands of consumers, insures the Gail Bor- 
den Eagle Brand Condensed Milk the first place in American homes, 



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When the cats are away the rats will play. When the Madam is 
in the country on her summer vacation is just the time to have your 
carpets taken up, cleaned beautifully and relaid by Spaulding's Carpet 
Cleaning Works at 353 Tehama street. Only experienced workmen 
and the most improved machinery employed. Prices reasonable. 

Don't suffer with dyspepsia Baldwin's Dyspepsia Capsules, with 
Baldwin's Health Tablets, will cure. Perry Drug Store, 8 Market street. 



Moet& 
Cl?aridoii 






WILLIAM WOLFF & CO, (f 
Pacific Coast Agents, l£ 
339 Market St., S. F. 



(The largest and oldest champagne house in the world.) 
White Seal (Grand Cuvee) of exceptional 
bouquet and dryness. —Court journal. 



Jaokson's Napa Soda water cures dyspepsia. 



i 
i 

I 

I 



M^-tMMMMA^^^'ilr'bV'fc ^-*^^^^*w9M*4k*)C 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1899. 




THE society event of 
the week was the 
wedding of Miss Alice 
Ames and Thomas 
Hinckley Eobbins of 
Boston which took place 
at Grace Church at high noon last Wednesday. There 
were no floral decorations in the church not even a flower 
upon the altar; the chancel was briHiantly lighted but the 
rest of the interior was comparatively dim; Grace Church 
being confessedly one of the least bright in the city for a 
morning ceremony. Considering the season of the year 
the sacred edifice was well filled though by no means 
crowded, those present including many of the old set of 
San Franciscans, in which category the brides' family can 
be placed. Sam Mayer presided at the organ during the 
preliminary hour and there were eight ushers resplendent 
in full morning dress and wearing each a white begonia in 
the button hole of their Prince Albert coats, but with the 
exception of two or three of them who seated nearly all 
the guests, their services were nil, they being, apparently, 
too busy discussing some subject among themselves to give 
time or attention to anything else. The bridal party en- 
tered as the clocks were striking the hour, to the strains 
of the Lohengrin Chorus, the eight ushers, Messrs. 
Worthington Ames, Walter Martin, Harry Tevis, John 
Polhemus, Bryant Grimwood, Roger Willcutt, Robert 
Bellows, and Hookett Berby leading; behind them followed 
the eight bridesmaids, the Misses Lillian Shoobert, Mamie 
Polhemus, Edith McBean, Norma Preston, Helen Little, 
Marie Wilson, Cora Smedberg, and Louise Crosby; the 
maid of honor Miss Bessie Ames, the lovely blonde bride 
escorted by her father, Pelham W. Ames, and proceeding 
up the center aisle they were met in the chancel by the 
groom and his best man, his brother William, the Rev. Dr. 
Poute performing the ceremony in his most impressive 
style. The bridal robe was of heavy white silk en traine 
trimmed with chiffon and true lovers' knots of white rib- 
bon caught by sprays of orange blossoms. She wore a 
tulle veil and a wreath of orange blossoms and carried a 
bouquei of bride's roses. The maid of honor was gowned 
in green organdie trimmed with white, and the brides- 
maids were costumed according to their several fancies in 
organdie gowns ot various colors, white, lilac, dark and 
pale pink, blue, lavender, and pale green, and carried 
bouquets of roses tied with bows of pink satin ribbon, Miss 
Helen Little very easily carrying off the palm of good 
looks from the rest, who were all pretty girls. The bride's 
mother, Mrs. Ames, who was evidently much affected by 
the coming parting with her daughter, was gowned in 
dark silk elaborately trimmed with beaded passementerie, 
and wore a bonnet to correspond. From the church the 
bridal party and relatives drove to the Ames residence, 
on Taylor street, which was very prettily adorned with 
flowers, where a dejeuner was served. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bobbins will reside in Boston. Among those in church 
were Mrs. and Miss Heath, Colonel and Mrs. Smedberg, 
Colonel and Mrs. W. C. Little, W. S. Jones, Mrs. M. S. 
Latham, John Perry Jr., Miss lumber, Mrs. Caroline 
Ashe, Major Rathbone, Mrs. Taylor, Miss Carrie Taylor, 
Mrs. Polhemus, Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Preston, the Wilsons, 
Crosbys, McBeans, and others. 

There were two weddings in one family the same day 
last week though on different sides of the continent, that 
of Miss Harriet Graham and Lieutenant Scales, U. S. N, 
taking place at noon on Tuesday at Christ Church, Bay 
Ridge, New York, where they were united in marriage by 
Bishop Folker; Miss Meta Graham officiated as maid of 
honor to her sister, and a reception followed the ceremony 



at the home of General and Mrs. Graham at Fort 
Hamilton, N. Y. The other wedding was that of 
Lieutenant James Graham, U. S. A., who was married to 
Miss Marie Kent at St. Paul's Church in Oakland on Tues- 
day evening, Bishop Nichols performing the ceremony 
which made them one. Here also the bride's sister, Miss 
Ethel Kent, was maid of honor, the bride's other sisters, 
the Misses Augusta and^Kathleen Kent, appeared as 
bridesmaids, and the groom's brother, Mr. W. M. Graham, 
officiated as best man. The church was very prettily 
decorated and filled with guests, and a reception was held 
later at the Kent residence on Jackson street, Oakland. 
Another of last week's weddings was that of Mrs. 
Charlotte Clarke Moulder and Leslie Allan Wright, the 
Rev. H. Stebbins tying the nuptial knot at the First Uni- 
tarian Church on Wednesday evening, in the presence of a 
very limited number of friends and relatives. 

San Francisco's social lights are enjoying life at the 
different resorts. At Castle Crag tke fresh delicious 
mountain air produces such a feeling of exhilaration that, 
as some of the guests express it, "it is a pure delight to 
feel you are alive." At Del Monte the sea breezes are re- 
freshing in their coolness, and though tank bathing is 
more popular than that of the beach, still the latter has 
its share of votaries also, but bathing is only one of the 
varied attractions of this enchanting place. 

At San Rafael golf is the great card, and the links are 
occupied every day and all day by a most enthusiastic lot 
of golfers. The correct thing there is luncheon parties at 
the Club House, and the capacity of that pretty buildiDg 
is taxed daily. The paper chase was inaugurated last 
Saturday and after a most spirited run Miss Marie Oge 
carried off the first Lady's prize, Chas De Young being 
the winner of the gentleman's. 

For those who are in town there is no lack of amuse- 
ment. There have been theatre parties to see Blanche 
Bates in the Dancing Girl, and to make the acquaintance 
of Lord and Lady Algy at the Columbia. 

Great will be the gathering of Bohemians at Meeker's 
Grove to-night. They come from all parts of the State 
to properly celebrate their new ownership of the grounds 
and the ceremonies arranged for the Jinks will, 'tis said, ex- 
ceed anything hitherto attempted in that line. 

Commander Richardson Clover, TJ. S. N. , arrived last 
Monday to join Mrs. Clover and their children, who had 
preceded him several weeks ago on their annual trip to 
California. Thev are spending the summer at the Miller 
Ranch in Napa Valley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Homer King and their daughters are 
among recent arrivals from the East. They will pay a visit 
to Tahoe and later go to Del Monte; Colonel Maus and his 
bride are domiciled at the Hotel Richelieu; Mrs. Ira Pierce 
and Miss Sophie will spend the month of August at Del 
Monte. Castle Crag has claimed them during July. Among 
others at the Tavern are Mr. and Mrs. Mansfield Lowell, 
Mrs. G. W. Fletcher, Miss Martha Fletcher, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. C. Strafford. Aleck Rutherford returned to town from 
Castle Crag the early part of the week. Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Grant are at Del Monte, where they will remain until 
after the festivities of August. There was a large influx 
of Eastern guests there this week. Mr. and Mrs. A. P. 
Talbot are among the householders at San Rafael this 
summer; Mrs. John M. Cunningham is also at that place. 

Mrs. Alden Jackson, Miss Jackson and Miss Alice Jack- 
son will leave Tuesday July 25th for an entended tour of 
Europe. 



F. C. 




F. C. 



CORSETS 



I 
I 

Both Stylish and | 

Elegant. : : : | 

Made of fine materials, Sold by leading stores *■ 



wtwt^t^tw+^swtwtw*™**^** 



Jtjljf 77. 1899. 



TR AKCtSCO NEWS LETTER. 



«7 



A sheet ri ase party was given on Saturday 

■ edere. which proved 
. ppearing in the grotesque 
:ne, and all enterng into the mirth and enjoyment 
of the oco.i- 

Fo'.lowinj,: are among the many recent arrivals at Hotel 
Judge and Mr -.'awell, Dr. and 

ngton Dodge and family. Dr. and Mrs. Frank Wil- 
son, family and maid. 

Air. recently registered at Carlsbad Springs 

.1 Grace. Rev. Father Pius, Miss 0. K. Ed- 
ward- icna Tolan. Mr. and Mrs. Tolan and fam- 
[ra. J. Stevens, Mrs. Lincoln, Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman 
and son, and others. 

Miss Catharine DuVal, daughter of W. S. DuVal, of 1011 
Pine street, is spending the summer at the home ranch, 
"Twin Oaks," near Oakville, Napa Valley. 

THE Lakeport and Bartlett Springs stage line, which 
runs from Hopland to Lakeport and Bartlett Springs, 
is one of the best equipped and most obliging in the State. 
Its stock is all young, and the stages and other vehicles 
are the best that money can buy. Passengers by that 
line reach their destination one hour ahead of all com- 
petitors. The drive from the railroad station, which 
under some conditions would be disagreeable, becomes one 
of the most delightful experiences of an outing. The 
scenery is really grand along the route, and behind the 
tine roadsters of the Lakeport and Bartlett Springs Line 
is something to be remembered. The proprietors and em- 
ployes of the company are always courteous and obliging, 
and the comfort of the passenger is the first and only con- 
sideration. 

THE Southern Paci6c special excursion to Santa Cruz, 
which takes place to-morrow, will be a great success. 
An immense number of tickets have been sold, and a jolly 
crowd will make the journey to that beautiful spot. There 
will be no crowding; there will be ample room for all. The 
fare has been placed at the low figure of $2 the round trip, 
and the hour of departure is agreeably late. The boat 
leaves the foot of Market street at 7:45 in the morning; 
the train leaves Santa Cruz at 4:12 p. m., arriving here at 
8:05. The excursion will be under the supervision of Col. 
W. H. Menton, and tickets will be sold at the ferry to- 
morrow morning, and to-day at the office of the Southern 
Pacific Company, 613 Market street. 

THE appointment of W. H. Mills as honorary expert in 
the forest and fishery department of the California 
exhibit at the Paris Pair, is a deserved compliment. No 
man in the State has taken so deep an interest in forestry 
as Mr. Mills, and his advice and directing mind will be of 
great value in making a complete showing of the wood 
products of California at Paris. 

THE citizens of Belvedere are preparing for their pro- 
posed "Night in Venice,'' and it is expected that the 
fete will be exceptionally brilliant. Special transportation 
rates will be obtained; a stand will probably be erected on 
the east shore of the bay with large seating capacity, so 
that visitors may enjoy an unobstructed view of the Night 
in Venice. Special committees have been appointed, and 
the detail plans are being carefully worked out. 

Delicious coffee and chocolate served with rolls or 

cake; moderate prices at Roemer's Original Vienna Cafe, 
205 Kearny street. 

" The Frenchman likes his native wine, 
The German likes bis beer, 
The Irishman likes his whiskey straight 
Because It gives good cheer; 
The Englishman likes his 'alt and 'alt 
Because it makes him frisky ; 
But they all go hack on their favorite drink 
For Jesse Moore "AA" Whiskey." 



The invigorating qualities of some liquors greatly exceed the value 
of others in this respect. Take lor instance J. F. Cutter and Argon- 
aut whiskies : They are of the finest quality and of most agreeable 
flavor. They are strengthening, mellow and pure. E. Martin & Co. 
411 Market street, are sole agents for the United States. 

That oold bottle and a hot bird Immortalized by Eugene Field are all 
very well In their way; but your steady beverage should be Napa Soda. 



|* T rCLII OOU»«UD I OMIINTAL 
' CRCAM OR MAGICAL •CauTiricn 



w , ml 




ui-toa (a pa 

llMlWl 
u U>< 

-ill pr m iapn- 
• -»!<' by all DruirirljtUl »nd 
Fancy-KfKHls I*raler» In the t'nlW 
tnmlft*, and Europe 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop'r. 
n Great Jones 91.. N. V. 



ELECTRIC LAUNDRY is our name, 
Linen we clean, make 
Each article so bright and clean 
Can see your face in polished sheen. 
To catch us quick by telephone 
Ring up our call, South 231. 
Id all our work we aim to please. 
Can do so with the greatest ease. 
Let him who well deserves high praise 
And does his best in all his days, 
Unite with all good men and true, 
Nor fail to give each one his due. 
Do this and we will keep you clean, 
Rinse from your conscience all things mean, 
You surely want thus to be seen. 

ELECTRIC LAUNDRY CO., 835 FoLSOM St. 



LA GRANDE LAUNDRY, 



Telephone Bush 12. 



Principal offloe, 83 Powell St., opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch— 11 Taylor St.. near Golden Gate avenue. 

Laundry— Twelfth St., between Folsom and Howard Sts.. San Francisco 



Pacific Towel Company 



No. 9 



Lick Place 



Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels, $1 per month. 
12 hand or roller towels, $1.50 per month. 
Tel. No. Main 1780. 

CITY STREET IHPROVEMENT CO., 

FIFTH FLOOR MILLS BUILDING. S. F. 

Proprietors ( Contractors for all kinds 

r*.. »,. of street work, bridges, 

Bitumen i lines. , and rai i way CO nstruc- 

santa Cruz and King city, tion, wharves, jetties 

Monterey County, Cal \ and Sea walls. 



DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



813 3utter Street, 
Tel. East 629, 



Dentist 



H. ISAAC dONES, M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Offloe, 834 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stookton Sts., S. F. 
Hours, 10 A. m. to 4 p. H. Sunday by appointment. 



Tel. Grant 101. 



np n F ni INNF 0f Olympic Club, Chiropodist, at Luone's 

L»i\. v. &. uunnL, Suoe storei 832 Mapket street( s _ F _ 

Hours from 9 A. M. to IS M.; 1 p. m. to p. u. Ingrowing toe nails a 
speolalty. 



BLAKE, MOFFIT & TOWNE 



Dealers In 



Telephone 
Main 199. 



Taper 



Blake, Mofflt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake, MoFall & Co., Portland, Or. 



65, 67, 59, 61 First St. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1899. 




Though my flesh is prone to shiver and my mortal bones to shake 
When the earth begins to rumble and to crackle and to quake, 
I would much prefer to suffer from the tremors underground 
Than be rolled and tossed and tumbled on the cars Presidio-bound. 
By your, angel with the manufactured dimple on her chin, 
On the dummy you are waiting for the journey to begin ; 
You are spieling pretty poems to her lips and eyes and hair, 
When the gripper bites the cable— and unconsciously you swear. 
For your car is grinding gravel ;— now it bumps upon the rocks 
Lying loose between the rails till you are weakened by the shocks. 
Now it sidles like a vessel with her broadside to the gale ; 
Now it climbs and takes a header like a billow-worsted sail. 
Now it leaps and now it staggers like a victim of the bowl, 
Till you shriek "Enough" and end the sorry pain of frame and soul. 
While you register a vow to ride on Union street no more, 
Cries your girly in a faint, "You should have registered before." 

Had I power I'd compel the sleek directors of the line 

In a bunch to ride and suffer all the tortures that were mine. 

I'd enjoy their perfect agony and keep them on the rack 

Till they ordered out the shovelry and leveled up the track. 

Like a jelly-fish you shiver and your bones together knock 

As the cable jerks you over that disintegrating rock. 

O, I'll take a dose of earthquakes ere again I pay for pain 

On a road that caters glee to fiends in Beelzebub's domain. 



One of the best-known citizens of Santa Clara, who has 
been a long while in Europe, brings back a number of 
funny stories about Vienna. 

" In that city," he says, "poker and cocktails are play- 
ing the deuce with men and women, especially these pre- 
pared cocktails. I was in a Viennese liquor place where 
one of the men spoke a little English. 

" ' Buy a bottle of cooked towels ? ' he asked me. 

" 'Gracious, what is that?' 

'■' Not know cooked towels? Surely, monsieur is an 
American.' 

"'lam.' 

" ' Why, cooked towels is the name of your drink. The 
great American drink.' 

" ' Do you mean cocktails ? ' I asked. 

"'Ah, mon Dieu, no. Cooked towels. See, here's the 
inscription.' 

" ' We call these cocktails, my friend.' 

"'Ah, thank you, I thank you. I ask the American 
ladies and gentlemen to buy the cooked towels and they 
laugh at me. Now I know. It is cockus tails. Ah, that 
is good to know: cockus tails.' " 
* * * 

Mr. Maxwell McNutt is a gentleman as well as a lawyer, 
and he is quite a young lawyer. He had been trying a 
case in court and he had been very diffuse. In truth, 
some of the older practitioners declare he bordered on 
verbosity, and a languor and depression fell upon his 
hearers. The flood of his eloquence never promised to 
cease flowing, but finally it did stop. 

Mr. McNutt was proud of his achievement — intensely 
proud of it, but, strange to say, nobody came up to him 
and gave him the glad hand. He singled out a sympa- 
thetic friend. 

"Ah," said he "what did you think of my speech?" 

"Great," replied the sympathetic friend, yawning. 

"You really think it was great?" 

"Indeed I do." 

"And not too long?" 

"Well — oh, no, not too long." 

"I am glad you think I spoke well. Do you know," 
continued Mr. McNutt, swelling with pride, "I could 
speak like that all day." 

"I have no doubt you could," muttered the friend, sotto 
voce, "but who in the devil would listen?" 



The Examiner made a great noise and sneered long and 
loud at the Call's abortive effort to rescue two egg gath- 
erers from the rocks near the Farallones; but it has had 
nothing to say about the money it paid the two men to be 
saved by it. When the Examiner's tug approached the 
rocks where the men were "marooned," a reporter asked 
them to come with him. 

"Naw,'' said Joe Cota; "we all right enough. What 
yer want us to leava da rock for?" 

"Aren't you suffering from thirst and hunger?" inquired 
the brave rescuers. "Here, poor fellows, is some cham- 
pagne." 

"Phew! Bill, what's this 'ere stuff? Pisen?" said Joe, 
as he took a drink. "Faugh! Throw the blamed cider 
away." 

Salted almonds, truffles and candies were rejected. The 
Examiner man had received instructions to bring these 
men to town, and he would do it. 

"Say, boys, I'll give you $25 a-piece if you'll come with 
me and be saved. I am after rescuing you, and they'll fire 
me if I don't bring you to the city." 

"Make it $30 a-piece and we'll come." 

"Done." 

And so Joe Cota and Martin came to town, got their 
$60, and spent it that night in their own fashion, and 

called the Examiner " ■ chump of a sheet." 

* » * 

Mr. Brocky Meehan is a distinguished gentleman who 
keeps a distinguished refreshment resort near the Holy 
Cross and Home of Peace cemeteries. Mr. Meehan also 
believes in being all things to all men. Now, the friends 
of the patrons of the Home of Peace do not like ham sand- 
wiches, while the Holy Cross people do — that is, the live 
ones. When Brocky sees Home of Peace people coming, 
away go the ham sandwiches and up comes cold mutton. 

Judge Conlan was observing this performance one day, 
and says : 

"Well, I was eating a ham sandwich one day, when I 
heard, ' Whist, Moike, here come the Home of Peace peo- 
ple — quick !' and before I could say Jack Robinson ham 
had disappeared and cold mutton sprang up as if by 
magic. 

" ' What's the meaning of this ? ' I asked. 

"'Now, Judge, be a darlint,' said Brocky, 'and keep 

your mouth shut about the ham sandwiches. Shure, the 

times are hard enough, and if them people knew I had 

ham, perhaps sorrow of a taste they'd take in the house.'' 

ft * # 

At the San Mateo races last Saturday, at the Hobart 
farm track, three events were run off with great success, 
but a single unpleasant incident momentarily marring the 
occasion. The unexpected happened in the sixth race in 
the contest for the Hume Cup. After the race, in which 
among others H. D. Walter and Walter Hobart took part, 
and which was won by Mr. Walter, Mr. Hobart on return- 
ing to the judges' stand, demanded that Walter weigh in, 
an intimation that he was under weight. Mr. Walter was 
weighed as requested, and Hugh Hume handed him the 
cup, declaring that the weight was right. Walter very 
properly declared that he did not want the cup under 
such conditions, and that he should return it to Mr. Hume 
who gave it. But after the matter was further talked 
over, and assurances given that everything was satisfac- 
tory and all possible objection removed — Mr. Hobart and 
Mr. Hume both desiring that Walter keep the cup — he 
decided to retain it. And so the incident was closed. If 
there was blame anywhere it could not be charged to Mr. 
Walter, but rather against the judges. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

One application of Smith's Dandruff Pomade stops itching scalp ; 
three to six applications removes all dandruff. Try it. Price 50 
cents, at all druggists. Sample free. Address Smith Brothers, 
Fresno, Cal. 

Creme r>B LIS removes all traces of sallowness and other faoial blem- 
ishes. Prevents tan, sunburn and Poison Oak Erases the lines that 
years of neglect have made In the face by keeping the skin taut, smooth 
and white. 

MOTHBRs.be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
:hltdren while teething. 



July 2 }, 1899. 



I NKWS LETTER 



'9 



SARAH BERNHARDT IN HAMLET. 

XLCOUSHLA MoCraa and I went to 
Jl s e< Bernhardt in Hamlet, as 
Hamlet, last night There was a 
crush and we sat in the pit — content 
to get anywhere. 

By and by the curtain went up. 
Enter Francesco, Bernardo, Horatio, 
Marcellus, and the ghost. I would 
have given worlds to be able to under- 
stand perfectly the soft melodious 
tongue in which they spoke. 

Scene second— and how smoothly 
the French do this scene shifting — re- 
vealing the grandeur of the court, the 
splendid Queen, perfectly acted by 
Marcya, and presently Sarah I like a 
grown-up Lord Fauntleroy, childlike, 
simple, exquisite in her inconsolable 
grief for her "Pi-re." And this is 
the keynote of the play, her grief for 
her "Pire." 

She is difficult to describe, this age- 
less woman. As well attempt to des- 
cribe a disembodied spirit. Standing 
there amid the magnificence of the 
court in her sombre mourning, black 
doublet, black hose, a long black 
mantle, which accentuates the blonde 
of her hair, worn in Lord Fauntleroy 
fashion about her neck, she is the em- 
bodiment of griel, as she is of youth — 
that is, with the exception of her 
hands. They alone are a little worn, 
a little old. 

But when, as the ghost reappears, 
and dashing her cap to the floor, she 
stretches out her arms imploringly to 
that pere of hers, those frail little 
hands trembling against the darkness, 
there is an epitome of grief in their 
trembling. I was sorry I had thought 
them a little worn, a little old. 

The curtain went down. The ap- 
plause ascended to the roof. I turned 
and looked at Acoushla McCree, in 
whose eye there stood a tear. 

" Have a chocolate," was all she 



xcelMtim 

IS THE BEST 

BECAUSE ITS PURITY 
IS ABSOLUTE. ITS FLAVOR 
UNIQUE , MADE IN 

NICE.FRANCE.o~ 





TRY IT WITH YOUR 

SALADS 



irngC 




.). D. Spreckels & Bros. Co. 

Shipping and Commission Mer- 
chants. General agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

Glllingham Cement. 

327 Market St., cor. Fremont, S. r. 



ET| cu ofallkinds.no matter how 

■ ■ ^5 ■ ■ PREPARED IS MADE PtRFECTLY 
DELICIOUS BY THE USE OF 

THt OR'OIWAL AND OtNUIHt W0RCCSTtR»HI«t- 

BEWARC OF MANUFACTURERS WHO ATTEMPT TO SELL 
AWORTHLtSS IMITATION. — ♦- 3EE SIGNATURE 
jomn Duncan's sons. Affrs.Ntw YORK. 




2 



said; at.ii blie pushed the box toward 
me. 

''It is well worth it all, Acoushla," 
said I. "I would even stand for four 
hour?, crushed by the crowd, to see 
the trembling of those delicate little 
hand-:." 

Tne curtain arose once more. 

Of course, there are accessories 
and other actors, too, in ,- Hamlet" — 
many and excellent actors, as it 
happens in Bernhardt's company; but 
the divine Sarah dwarfs them all. We 
waited breathlessly for her appear- 
ance, we sighed when the curtain fell 
upon her. As Ophelia, Marthe Mellot 
is a dream. Blonde of head and fair, 
she crosses the stage like a sylph, 
trailing a gown after her which is ap- 
parently priceless. In her colloquy 
with Hamlet she rises to heights; but 
Hamlet soars heavenward. 

The superb queen mother; the con- 
ference in her chamber, the ghost re- 
appearing, and the supplicating grief 
of the youthful Hamlet; the soft, be- 
seeching voice, "Mon Pere, mon 
Pere"; the little white hands trem- 
bling again; the burial of Ophelia, 
wax-like, perfect, stretched stiffly out 
on her beflowered bier, swathed in her 
silken burial robe, her winding shee, 
and lowered into her grave without 
prayer or ceremony — a suicide; and 
afterward Hamlet's grief at her 
grave. Beautiful, beautiful! Acoushla 
McCree sat close to me with tears in 
her eyes. She silently pressed my 
band. There were no more chocolates 
to offer. We had munched them all. 

Then the final scene, the duel, the 
wonderful fencing of Hamlet, and his 
death. They lift him high on their 
shoulders, stretched on a bier black 
as Ophelia's was white, his small feet 
toward us. 

It is impossible to resist the impres- 
sion l hat he is really dead; that those 
little feet will never again tread the 
boards of the stage, and there is deep 
and genuine grief in the thought. 
After a time they turn him about and 
stand there at the back of the stage. 
You have a view of him above the 
crowd, slight, lifeless, pitiful, bis 
curled head drooping helplessly, the 
slender hands quietly clasped, his 
question of "To be or not to be" solved 
for ever and aye; the curtain falls and 
a long sigh arises. 

"Oh, Acoushla McCree!" I panted, 
half sobbing. "Acoushla McCree I" 

"Look!" 

She pointed to the stage, where the 
divine Sarah stood bowing, bowing, 
bowing, in answer to thundering ap- 
plause which shook the house. 



I looked and bowed my head in 
reverence. 

"This is hardly a woman," said I. 
"It is a spirit, a soul." — London Cor- 
respondence of The Criterion. 



"Herbertis just a plain, every 

day young man,'' said Mabel to her 
father. There's precisely the objec- 
tion," was the prompt reply. "I 
might stand him every other day, but 
this business of calling seven times a 
week is getting tiresome." 

NW0*AAAVVVVVVvWVVA*AVl 



Reduced Long 
Distance Tarilt 



Tariff bet. San 5 Cle. 

Francisco and any H 1 addU'al 

office in minute minute for eac 

Colusa County 1 

Sutter County I 1 jn 15 seo'da 

Yuba County ! 

Placer County J 

Butte County ) 

Glenn County >$ .60 1 .76 10 seeds 

Nevada County ) 

Fresno County ) 

Tulare County Vt .60 11.00 10 seo'ds 

Kings County J 

Ventura County I » .76 11.86 6 seo'ds 

Santa Barbara Co. j 

Los Angeles Co. 1 

Orange County I S1.00 11.60 J seo'ds 

Riverside County 5 

San Bernardino Co. J 

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Gitu Index and Purchaser's Guide 



RESTAURANTS 
POODLE DOG Restaurant, N.E. cor. Eddy 
and Mason streets. Private dining and 
banquet rooms. Telephone 429. 

A. B. Blanco & B. Brcn 

BAY STATE Oyster House & Grill room, 
15 Stockton street and 109 O'Farrell St. 
N. M. Aplee, proprietor. Tel. Main 5057 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS 
W. F. QREANY, 827 Brannan St. Select- 
ions on approval ; any place in the world. 

BOILER-MAKERS. 

F. F. DTJNDON'8 San Francisco Iron 
Works— 314-316-318 Main St; Iron work of 
every description designed and constructed 

CA8CA FERRINE BITTERS 

The world's greatest tonic, stomachic, laxa- 
tive; cares positively constipation and 
piles. Sierra Pharmaceutical Co., 1109 
Howard street, San Francisco. 

DENTISTS. 

DR. G. A. DANZIGER, Dentist, 22 Geary 
Street, San Francisco . 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1899. 





The News Letter has es- 
tablished at its office, No. 5Vfc 
Kearny street, a reliable Bu- 
reau of Information, where any- 
one seeking information, routes 
of travel, attractions, prices of 
entertainment, and all other 
facts that are necessary to a 
choice of a Summer Resort may 
be obtained FREE. 




PARAISO HOT 

SPRINGS 

MONTEREY CO., CAL. 

The Carlsbad of America. For health, rest, 
pleasure, climate, accommodations, scenery, 
flower beds, cleanliness, table, hot sodaand sulphur 
tub and plunge baths, massage treatment, special bath-houses for ladies 
and lady attendant, hunting and Ashing, children's playground, croquet, 
lawn tennis, and dance hall. Grounds and oottages lighted by gas. For 
families, Paraiso Btands unsurpassed in the State; plenty of enjoyment 
for young and old. Take train Third and Townsend streets, San Francisco, 
9 a.m., and at Oakland from First and Broadway at 9:i0 a. m. daily for 
Soledad. Return-trip tickets $8. at S. P. offloe, 613 Market street; seven 
miles by stage. Telephone and postofflce. For illustrated pamphlets and 
further information address, J. PERRAULT, M. D., Proprietor and Resi- 
dent Physician. 

U4/"\\»/nDr\ ODDIMPQ picturesquely situated 
llUWMKD OrlAlnbO amidst the pine forests 
of Lake Co.— the Switzerland of America. 
Elevation 2300 feet; no fog; climate per- 
fect. Natural hot mineral plunge and tub 
baths, fine medicinal drinking water. Ex- 
cellent Ashing and hunting. Postofflce and 
telephone on premises. Rates $8, 110 and 
$12 with special terms for families. Ac- 
commodations, table and servlceflrst class. 
Round tilp from San Francisco via Napa, 
Calistoga, 110, including fine stage drive. 

For accommodations and further par- 
ticulars address 

MRS. R. J. BEEBY, proprietor, Putah P.O. 



HOTEL BENVENUE AND COTTAGES 

LAKEP ORT, CAL 

Lakeport's Leading Sumti.;.- Resort. 
Situated overlooking the shore on Clear Lake. 
Elegant new pavilion. Boat house and Bowl 
lag Alley. Special facill ties for accommo- 
dating families with children; home cooking; 
boating, bathing, hunting, and superior Ash- 
ing; no Chinese employed. 

Open all the year 
FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors 



BLUE LAKES HOTEL 

Will be conducted in a quiet, home-like 
manner, with one of the best tables In the 
county; Rates $10 to $12. Round trip $9.50. 
S. F. & N. P. to Ukiah; thence by stage from 
Palace Hotel. Address 






JOHN WILSON, 



Bertha, Lake county, Cal. 



SAMUEL SODA SPRINGS. 

Sure cure for dyspepsia, indigestion, rheumatism, and constipation. 
Hot mineral baths. These springs are looated in Napa CouDty, twenty 
miles east of St. Helena. The water ts bottled at the springs, and contains 
its own natural gas, Stage leaves St. Helena. 

J. R. MORRIS, Proprietor, 

Napa County, Cal. 

CARLSBAD " The mosi b eau tif u l spot in Lake County 

The mineral springs are well known for marvelous cures when every- 
thing else fails, especially in oases of stomach, liver, kidney and bladder 
affections. Good bathing; superior accommodations $10 per week; hotel 
lighted with gas ; good trout Ashing and deer hunting on property. 

For particulars wrhe W. R. McGOVERN, Carlsbad, Lake County 



SEIGLER SPRINGS LAKE county, cal, 




This delightful watering place is located 
In the midst of the Coast Range 

Abundance of Mineral Springs 
Hot and cold plunge baths, large swim- 
ming tank of mineral water, floe stone 
dining room ; telephone connections ; 
electric lights, livery accommodation; 
good trout Ashing and hunting Round 
trip tickets at southern PaolAo offices. 
$10. 

JOHN SPAULDING, Proprietor. 



BONANZA SPRINGS 




LAKE COUNTY. CAL A 

natural oamping ground; five 
differeot mineral and two pure 
wate prlngs. We cater to campers only. Fishing and hunting; cottages 
to re ;, $1.50 up per week; pure water piped to each cottage. Hot and cold 
mineral baths; all necessaries can be purchased on the grounds; ham- 
mocks, swings, and croquet; summer houses in shady groves. One mile 
north of Howard Sprlrgs Post and Money Order Office— dally mall Ad- 
dress, R. F. DOCKERY, Prop.. Putah P O., Lake County, Cal., or S. F. 
News Letter Bureau, 5V' 3 Kearny St. 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Only natural mineral steam baths in Lake Co. 

Hot sulphur and Iron Baths. Board $8 to $14 
per week; baths free. Address 

J. ANDERSON, 
Anderson Springs. Middletown, Lake county. 
Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return, $8. 
Send for circular. 

JW" Full particulars at S. F. News Letter. b% Kearny street, S. F. 



GLEN BROOK Lake county 

Remember— It you want to hunt; if you want to 
fish; if you want to recuperate; if you want the 
best of recreation; if you want pure air and sun- 
shine; If you want to enjoy an exhilarating climate 

Come to G/enbrook 
0. W. R. TREDWAY, proprietor Glenbrook Hotel 



SKAGGS HOT SPRINGS Sonom a county 

Only 4H hours from San Francisco and but 9 miles staging. Waters 
noted for medicinal virtues, best natural bath in State; swimming and 
boating; grand mountain scenery; good trout streams at door. 

First-Class Hotel and Stage Service. 

a. m. or 3:30 p. m. Terms $2 a day or $12 
J. F. Mulgrew, Proprietor. 




Tabe Tiburon Ferry at 7 
a week. 




AGUA CALIENTE 
SPRINGS HOTEL 

Sonoma Valley, two hours from 
San Francisco via Tiburon ferry. 

Warm mineral swimming and tub 
baths. Water, gas, electric bells. 

$iu to$i2 per week, $2 per day. 

Address 

AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

Agua Callente, Sonoma co 




Before going on your vacauuu drop a postal to 

HOBERG'S 

For full particulars. LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 

Short drive to any of the famous mineral 
springs of Lake County. 

Mention this paper. $7 and $8 per weeK 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM 

Thoroughly Equipped with all modern appliances for the relief of 
suffering humanity, all forms Water Treatment, the finest Static Gal- 
vanic Sinusoidal and Faradic Electrical apperatus, A Corps of well 
trained nurses of both sexes, skilled in all forms of treatments and 
manipulations, Rest Cube scientifically carried out. The tURBST and 
best of foods manufactured and for sale. * * * A quiet, home like 
place, beautiful scenery, Mount Hamilton and the famous Lick Obser- 
vatory in plain view; one block from electric cars, fifteen minutes walk 
from the center of the city. Terms $8 to $20 per week, Including medioal 
attention and regular treatment. 

Garden City Sanitarium, EAST SAN JOSE C/t 



July 12. 1899. 



SAW PR I NBWS l.i ITKR 



>i 



Hot Sulphur Plunge 



la CM of ibedallKhl* of Paso Roble* 
Hot Sprints a mafnlOcent b»lh 
bovae. HMD feat, coaling am 
ii%* two aactlona -one aide exclu- 
sively for women. Competent men 
■ad women maaaeura In constant at- 
tendance. Water la valuable medici- 
nal tonic. 

OTTO E. NEVER, Proprietor, 

Paso Roblca.Cal 
Clli office. S» Market street. 




Strictly First-Class 

All Modern Improvements 

Electric Lights 

Liberal Rates 



Hotel Lyndon 

Los Gatos, Gal. 



LYMAN H. TOLFREE, 
Proprietor. 



BLITIiEDALE 




AT THE FOOT OF MT. TAMALPAIS, 

MILL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 

Within an hour of San Francisco. 
Grounds comprise 160 acres 
Supplied with mountain spring water. 
Lighted by electricity. 
Golf links and tennis court. 
'Bus meets all trains. 

J. A. ROBINSON, LESSEE. 

Telephone ' BUthedale." 



HOTEL MATEO and Cottages, San Mateo 

Cuisine Unsurpassed 
Climate Delightful 
Grounds Beautiful 

W. G. GRAHAM, Proprietor 

HOTEL BELWEDERE 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 

A superb resort. 30 minutes from San 

Francisco. 

Modern new hotel and cottages. 

Perfect service. 

Mrs. A. T. Mooee 
Belvedere 

HOTEL de REDWOOD 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS 

One of the most beautiful spots in the heart of the Redwoods. 
Fine water, mineral springs, beautiful views, walks and drives. 
Altitude )500 feet. Rates. $8 and $10 per week. Round trip from San 
Francisco to Laurel Station, Narrow Gauge, ltf.50 
Write for particulars. 

M. S, COX, Proprietor 




HOTEL EL MONTE 



Los Gatos, Cal 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

Delightful climate; lovely drives; all large sunny rooms ; strictly first 
class; new management. American plan. 

JOHN NEVILL, proprietor. 



CYPRESS VILLA 

NOW OPEN 
B Street San Rafael, see* Rum Oee«a 

Tola favorite rrsort bas brf>n oe* 

and baa undergone an on' - 

famlllea. touriata, and the public raDerellT. 

tbe eeoorotnndellnoa are ur.i, 

by day, week, or month 








The Discoverer of Rubicon Springs. 



RUBICON 
SODA SPRINGS 

On RntriOOD River lit miles from 
MrKlnnry's. LAKK TAB 

Primitive, clean home cooking. 
New management; new furnishing: 
now sii.ges; G000 HUNTING: iluollsh- 
ing and troatlng on river and lakes; 
the drive to the uprlugs Is the most 
picturesque mrest drive In Califor- 
nia. These springs are noted for 
medicinal value in stomach, liver, 
and kiiney troubles and relief for 
obesity. 

Rat es. I10.5O to 913 a week, f i a day. 
D. ABBOTT. MRS. T. B. SMITH, 
Manager. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



-Vm. B. Hooper, Manaaer. 



San Francisco 



HOTEL BARTHOLDI, 



THE very center of the olty, convenient to 
all the big stores and all places of amusement. 
European Plan, $1.00 a day upwards. 
23d Street and Broadway, New York. 

(Opposite Madison Square Park). Reed & Roblbb, Mgrs. 

HOTEL BELLA VISTA A F"»^^s hotel 

The Bella Vista is the Pioneer First-class 
Family Hotel of San Francisco. All the 
comforts of a modern residence. 



1001 Pine street 



MRS. DENVER, Proprietor 



Te 



NTS 

FLAG 

Camp Furniture 




AMES &HARR1S, Inc. S£SSSS&. 
BROUGHAMS AND COUPES (Rubber Tires.) 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE 

Nos. 57-59-61 Minna Strbet, Between First 
and Second. One block from Palace Hotel. 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, 
Corner Post and Stockton. Tel. Main 158. 
Every vehicle requisite for weddings. Par- 
ties, calling, shopping, business, or Pleas- 
ure. Special orders for four-in-hands. 
Tel. Main 153. 
J. Toukinson, Prop'r. Established 1862. 

0. A. MURDOOK X GO., Printers, 

No. 532 GLAY STREET, S F. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1899. 



OBITUARY 

HOWARD Havens, a California pioneer, well and favor- 
ably known in this city and throughout the State, 
died at his home in Alameda on the evening of the 16th 
; nst. Mr. Havens was the head of the Donohoe-Kelly Bank- 
ing Compauy, and a prominent member of the Society of 
California Pioneers. He was a native of New York city, 
and was born April 26, 1820. Deceased leaves two sons 
and a daughter— Charles R., Howard C, and Miss Ella M. 
Havens. Charles R. Havens is manager for Murphy, 
Grant & Co., and Howard C. Havens is with the Fireman's 
Fund Insurance Company. 

Announcement of the death of 
Mrs. John H. Lynch. Mrs. John Hampton Lynch, which 

took place on the 11th inst. at 
the summer home of the family at Great Neck, R. I., will 
be received by the many friends of the deceased in this 
State with surprise and deep regret. Mrs. Lynch was 
the daughter of the late Dr. James Simpson, whose death 
occurred a little more than one year ago. Mrs. Lynch 
was a graduate of Mills' Seminary and was a young lady 
of many accomplishments. Her death was most unex- 
pected, and was the result of malignant malaria. She 
was 3") years old and leaves a husband and three children, 
the youngest a babe. 

R-XAMPLE of western logic: The railroad company 
L/ operates bars for the sale of intoxicating liquors. As 
a result of the sale of intoxicating liquors, drunkards are 
made. Therefore, the railroad company makes drunkards. 
But the railroad company has abolished these bars. To 
abolish bars where intoxicating liquors are sold is to ad- 
vance the cause of temperance and sobriety. To advance 
the cause of temperance and sobriety is to benefit all man- 
kind. But we refuse to credit the railroad company with 
a moral motive, and contend that it is abolishing bars to 
spite the liquor trust. Therefore, the railroad company 
is guilty of hypocrisy, and we condemn it as a matter of 
course. 

THE new department of J. J. O'Brien & Co., in which 
clothing for children may be bought, is proving to be 
a great success. Mothers find it so convenient when they 
are in the big store making their own purchases, to take 
the children along and fit them out at the same time. The 
children's clothing department is now one of the promi- 
nent and popular features of the J. J. O'Brien & Co.'s dry 
goods house. 

U. S. Government Buys Typewriters. 
L. & M. Alexander just received an order for ten more Smith 
Premier Typewriters from army headquarters. 

Ladies do not have to wear switches to cover up their defects if 
they use Smith's DandrufT Pomade in time, it cures dandruff, itch- 
ing scalp, stops falling hair and makes hair grow. Price 50c at all 
druggists. 

THE Spoopendike Papers, which were published years 
ago in the Brooklyn Eagle and gave that paper a 
very wide notice and circulation, are now printed in book 
form, paper covers, making a volume of more than 200 
pages. 

J. M. Litchfield & Co., 10 Post street, make the finest and most 
stylish suits in the City. Especially correct are their military fults. 
The best quality of goods and richest materials only u>eil. In fit, 
finish, and appearance the suits made by Litchfield & Co. are always 
swell. 



AT the annual election of the Produce Exchange held 
Wednesday last, Geo. W. McNear was made^Ptosi- 
dent, succeeding Herman Eppicger. Mr. McNear's selec- 
tion is peculiarly fitting, inasmuch as he is one of the most 
prominent and wealthiest grain dealers in the Stair, and 
has been identified with the flour and wheat business of 
California for many yea 

Every clay from 1 1 until 2 a fine merchant's luncheon is spread at 
the Grand Hotel Oafr. Kay * Poster, proprietors. The cafe has 
been recently completely renovated and the best service and 
luncheons to be had in the city are provided. 

Gentlemen can have private rooms for their luncheon without 
extra charge, at the Maison Riche, corner Grant avenue and Geary 
street. Champagne reduced to %i per quart and $2 per pint. 




My busy day" 



— cleaning day. 1 'one in 
the hard-working, bustling 
way, every man, woman and 
child gets undercover. I fse 
Pearline ; nobody's troub- 
led, not even you yourself. 
Pearline house cleaning is 
quicker, better, sooner 
I If through with, easier. Saves 
rubbing, paint, temper. 
Where you can u^e water 
P t 1 leaning, use Pearline with 
it andyou'll get the best work. 
Let the children help; it's training them in the: 
way they should no. 657 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Ban* 
For the half year ending June 3">, 1899, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rati of three '3) per cent, per an- 
num, free of taxes, payable on and after July 1, 1*89. 

S. L. ABBOT JR., Secretary 
Office— 222 Montgomery street, Mills Building. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the half year ending 
June 30, 1899, at the rate of three aDd eighty-four one hundredths (3 84) per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and three and twenty hundredths <3 20) 
per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 
after Saturday, July I, 1899. Dividends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of dividend as the principal from and after July I. It99. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, cor. Sutter, san Francisco Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending with June 30, 1899, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on term deposits, SDd three 
and one-third (3 13) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1. 1899 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office: 626 California street, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of me Hibe | Sa rings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAll (s 
ter, and Jones streets - ■ I* rancisco, June 28, 1899. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one third (3^) per cent, per annum on all 
deposits for the six mouths ending June 3u, 1899, free from all taxes, 
and payable on and after July 1, 1899. 
ROBERT J. TOBTN. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Oceanic Steamship Company. 
Dividend No. 95, Fifty cents per share, of the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany, will be payable at the office of the company, 327 Market street, on 
and after Tuesday, August 1, 1*99 Transfer books will close on Wednes- 
day. July 26, 1899, at 3 o'clock p. M. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 
Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hutchinson Sugar Plantation Company. 
Dividend No, 69, of 25 cents per snare, of the Hutchinson Sugar Planta- 
tion Company, will ho payable at the office of the company, 327 Market St., 
on and after Thursday. July 20, 1899. Transfer booky will close on Fri- 
day July 14. 1899. at 3 o'clock p. m. E H. SHELDON. Secretary 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, oandv-makera 
canners. dyers, Hour-mills, foundries, ibunur'ea 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories 
■ table men, tai-roofers. tanners, tailors, eto 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St., S. F Tel. 5610. 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Fens. 



THE AWARD AT 
CHICAGO 1893. 



Gold Medals, Paris, 1878-1889. These pens are ' the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United States. 
Mr Henry Hoe, 9t John street. NewYork. 
Sold by all Stationers. 



Weak Men and Women 



Should use DAMIANA BIT 
TERS, the great Mexican rem 
edy; It gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs Depot at 883 Mar- 
street, San Francisco. Send for olroular. 



July 27. 1899. 



SAN PR A NCI \VS LETTER. 



»3 



WHAT IS THE MATTER WITH DEWEY'S HOMECOMINQr 

ADMIRAL IVwey is now in the rejfion of U-legraph 
cables, and no doubt bears from hone rrery day, 
or, at any rate, as often as he wants. For som- 
son best known, probably, to the authorities at 

i, he is delaying the really o/reat reception that 
awaits him at New York for an unconscionably long 
period. It was originally planned that he should reach 
early in August, but it is now officially declared that 
he will not appear off Sandy Hook until the end of October. 
What he is going to do between this and then we are not 
told. He will have to waste three more months in some 
way or other. A visit to bis old friends at Malta and 
Gibraltar would no doubt be agreeable to him, and what- 
ever pleases the hero of Manila will gratify the people of 
America. But each of such visits could not well occupy 
more than a week or ten days. Admiral Dewey is not the 
man to outlive his welcome. He knows what a disturb- 
ance such a visit as his would be to the routine of a first- 
class naval station. He ought, therefore, to be in New 
York some day in August, as was originally fixed. He 
could not cross the Atlantic during a better month, and 
he could not spend a more health-giving autumn anywhere 
than among the hills of his native Vermont. Yet he is 
idling away his time in the Mediterranean for some rea- 
son not apparent to the American people. Is he, too, 
subject to the press censorship? Can it be that his views 
as to what is now going on in the Philippines are unfavor- 
able, and need to be suppressed for a time? Who is it 
that is throwing ice-cold water on the project to build or 
buy Dewey a home? It was the Brooklyn Eagle that first 
started the enterprise, and has been booming it ever 
since. But despair has at last overtaken it. Washington 
has given the project a cold shoulder, and nothing "goes" 
in the East that is not boomed from the National Capital. 
Up to the 12th of the present month the total sum raised 
by the National Committee and its accessories amounted 
to $5,958, and subscriptions were then at a standstill. 
That does not look as if our greatest naval hero is to get 
a home in the land he has served so well. It looks very 
much as if there were something wrong in official circles 
over Dewey's return. The plain people are, however, all 
right. 

THE many friends of Prank Runyon, of the Goodyear 
Rubber Company, will greatly regret to hear that 
while out driving near Belvedere, iast Wednesday, he was 
thrown from his vehicle and very badly injured. The cart 
in which he was riding sharply turning a corner unseated 
him, and in falling Mr. Runyon struck heavily on his head. 
The shock of his fall was very great and for some hours he 
was unconscious. He is now recovering and will be about 
in a few days. 

Very latest things in the art world are to be seen at Morris', 248 
Sutter street. New and artistic articles are continually arriving. 
Special attention given to framing. Sole agent for Moulton's cele- 
brated photographs. 

Baldwins Dyspepsia Capsules give quid: relief and permanent cure. 
Ferry Drug Store. 8 Market street. 

There are lots of "AA" brands ot whisky, but onir one Jesse Moore "AA " 

"and you think I'd better ask your father now ?" 

" Yes. It will be a little mild practice for you. Then 
come back aod ask ma." 



THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL. Dinner. — Sunday, July 23, 1899. 

California Ovster Cocktail 
Soud— Bisque otCrabauSauterne; Consomme Souverame 
Hors DOeuvres-Chow Chow; Celery en Brancbe; California Olives; 

Salted Almonds. „ , ~,. ., ,-, 

Fish — Boiled Tn-bot, Sauce Genevolse: Pommes Horgrotse; Sliced ou- 

'cumbers; Boiled Striped Hass Maitre d'Hotel. 
Boiled. -Dupee Ham, Riesling Sauce 
Entrees —Progs' Lees a la Poulette en Caisse; Dove Pic a la Gastro- 

Lome; Larded Piletof Beef a la Renaissance; uaba auRum 
Roast— Prime KtbsofBeef au Jus; Spring Lamb, Mint Sauce; Stuffed 

Goo^e with Compote of Apples. Punch.— Cnartrense. 
Veaetables —Green Peas a l'Anglaise; Corn in Cob: Chicory aa oeut, 

Boiltd, Baked, and Mashed Potatoes; Boiled Rice. 
Cold Meats.— Pate dePoie Gras Truffe en Croute; Smoked Tongue; Koast 

Salads-Lettuoe; Romaine: CraokedCrab. Sauce Mayonnaise; Escarole 
Dessert —Steamed Pig Pudding. HarO and Brandy Sauce ; Raspberry Pie; 
Lemon Cream Pie; Champagne Jelly; Coffee Ice Cream; Assorted 
Nuts, Cluster Raisins; Assorted Cakes; American Cream, Edam ana 
Roquefort Cheese; Fruit in Season, Smyrna Figs, Tea and Gorree. 
Dishes not on this menu oan be ordered at restaurant prices 
Dinner, 6 to 8 P. M. R. H. WARFIELD & CO., Proprietors. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 



capital at. 



Loca' 



company, Toon 
Any Mock upon wbtcb 



will bo delinquent an-; 

payment Is ma- 

IfW, to pay the del In-: 1 

and expenses of sale Hy order of I 

Office — Room S3, Nevada Block 39 Monti 



- cretarjr 



Oal. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Justice Mining Company. 
Location of principal pin, iranclsco, California. Loca 

tlon of works— Gold Hill, Slorcy 1 'omity, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Hoard of Directors, held 
on the 6U1 day of July, 189°, an assessment No. 65. of T- n ecu' 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room to, Nevada Block, 900 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
8th DAY OF AUGUST. 1899, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment Is made before will be sold on Tuesday, the lo'lh day of August. 
1899, to pay tho delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertis- 
ing and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R K KELLY. Secretary. 
Office— Room 40, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business -San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works-- Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting ot the Board of Directors, held 
on the 14th day. ot July, 1899, an assessment (No 61) of Ten (10) cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme 
diately in Uolted tales gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the com- 
pany, room i\7, Mills Building, ihird floor, San Francisco, Cal . 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 16th DAY OF AUGUST, 1899, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 6th day of 
September, 1899, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Hoard of Direc- 
tors. F E. DIETZ, Secretary. 

Office: Room 87. Mills Building, third floor, San Franolsco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Ophlr Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 75 

Amount per Share 15 cents 

Levied ..., July 6, 1899 

Delinquent in Office August 8, 1899 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock ....August 28, 1899 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Room 50, Nevada blook, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 86 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied May 2, 1899 

Delinquent in office July 6, 1899 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock July 27, 1899 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office — Room 69, Nevada Blook, 309 K cnlgomery streets. San Fran- 
olsco. Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works, for tbe election of trustees for the ensuing year and the trans- 
action of such other business as may be brought before the meeting, will 
be held at the office of the oompaoy, southeast corner of Beale and Howard 
streets, San Francisco, on 

MONDAY, the 7lh DAY OF AUGUST, 1890, at 11 o'clock a. m. 

L. R. MEAD, Secrotary. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Hakalau Plantation Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Hakalau Planta- 
tion Co will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market street, San 
Francisco, Cal, on 

TUESDAY. THE 1st DAY OF AUGUST, 1899. 
atthehourof 11 o'clock a. m., for the purpose of electing a Board or Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may be brought before the meeting. Transfer books will olose on 
Saturday, July 29, 1899, at 12 o'clock m. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary, 
Office: 327 Market street, San Francisco. Cal. 

ST. LAWREN6& 

LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLE 

W. E. Bridge, Proprietor 

42S Post St., between Powell and Mason. 
San Franolsco. Telephone, No. 1328. 




24 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

BANKING. 



July 22, 1899. 



"Briggs and his family are living in a houseboat." "A 
houseboat?" "Yes. Briggs rented an old canal boat and 
had it fitted up. They pole it along the bank when they 
want to change locations. Briggs wrote me that all they 
needed to make it seem like real canal life was a pair of 
flea-bitten mules." "What else did he say?" "He wanted 
to know if you and I wouldn't come up." 

Young Father (in the future) — Great snakesl Can't you 
do something to quiet that baby? It's eternal squalling 
just drives me wild. Young Mother (calmly, to servant) 
■ — Marie, bring in my husband's mother's phonograph and 
put in the cylinder, "At 10 months." I want him to hear 
how his voice sounded when he was young. 

"What are those queer-looking trophies the Filipinos 
wear around their necks? " asked the raw recruit. 
" Them's the medals for the century runs they've made 
during the war," replied the Kansas volunteer. — Phila- 
delphia North American. 

Mi-s, Hix — You shouldn't complain about your clothes, 
John. What would you do if you had no wife to mend them. 
Me. Hix — Oh, in that case I would soon be able to save 
up enough money to buy a new outfit. 

Ethel (excitedly) — O, papa, hurry, quickl Mr. Sappy is 
lying on the parlor sofa in great pain. He swallowed his 
monocle! Papa (coolly) — Well, can't it be duplicated? 
Ethel — O, yes; but Mr. Sappy can't. 

"How many runs did your club make Larry?" "Three, 
sor." "Three runs, eh?" "Yis, sor. A run for the um- 
pire, a run for th' doctor an' a run to th' police station. — 
Chicago News. 

The Missionary — Do you believe in the softening and ele- 
vating influence of woman? The Bandit — Naw; didn't 
me brudder marry four of 'em en den get pinched fer 
bigamy? 

The Editor — Your poems bear merit, but they are not up 
to date. Write them on something that is before the peo- 
ple's eyes. The Poet — I tried that, but could find nothing 
to rhyme with spectacles. 

" My Boy says his ambition is to grow up to be a man 
just like his father." "I wouldn't let that worry me. 
When I was your boy's age I had a burning desire to be a 
pirate." 

The Belle — Miss Leftover writes that she is charmed 
with the summer resort to which she has gone. The 
Beast — No wonder. An arm of the sea runs right up by 
the hotel. 

Judge (to the man up for having five wives) — How could 
you be so hardened a villain? Prisoner — Please, your 
honor, I was only trying to get a good one. — Stray Stories. 

" Life must be pretty monotonous in eastern Kentucky." 
"How so?" "There doesn't seem to be anything in it but 
feud and drink 1" — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

Snodgrass — The world has a place for everybody. 
Mioawber — Yes; the only trouble is, there's generally 
somebody else in it. 

"The Overland Limited," via Chicago, Union Pacific, and 
Northwestern Line. 
Only three and one-half days to Chicago. Four and one-half days 
to New York. Pullman Vestibuled Sleepers. Pullman Dining Cars. 
Pullman Tourist Sleepers. The "Overland Limited" leaves San 
Francisco every day in the year at 6 p. m. Cabin reservations made 
and steamship tickets sold to all parts of Europe. For full particu- 
lacsand sleeper reservations address D. W. Hitchcock, General 
Agent, No. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Do you know that Smith's Dandruff Pomade has cured thousands 
of cases of dandruff, itching scalp, eczema and falling hair when all 
other remedies have failed ? Price 50c at all druggists. Sample Free. 
Address Smith Bros., Fresno, Cal. 

Ponce de Leon would never have sought the fount of perpetual youth if 
e had first dlsoovered Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Bank of British Columbia. { h££tfT*X& s %ffi£,!2& 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000 Reserve Fund t 600,000 

HEAD OFFICE. 00 Lohbard Stbbet, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vanoouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson Rosslamd, Sandon, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts openedsub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon Its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows : 

new York— Merchants' Bank of Canada ; Chicago— First National Bank ; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of 'Ireland ; Mexico — London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of 
Sydney, Ld ; Demeraba and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon District, arrangements having been made 
with the Cansdlan Bank of Commerce whereby It is prepared to issue 
drafts and Letters of Credit on that Bank at above point, and transact 
other banking business. Terms upon application. 

The flnrjIo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 16,000,000 

Subsorlbed 8,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Gob. Pine and Sansome Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. O. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broadstreet. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of oredit available throughout the 

world. Sends bill* for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART 1 M _.„„ or . 

P. N. LILIENTHAL / «">»geni 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 
Jas. K. Wilson, President. E. A. Bruguierb, Vice-President. 

Lewis I. Cowoill, Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital 1500,000 

Directors: Jas.K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope, E. A. Bruguiere, John Barton, C. £. Benedict. 

Agents: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
BostoD— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drezel &, 
Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

88 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Pald-Up Capital I 800,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vloe-Presldent. 
GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President 

C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drezler, John A. Hooper, C. Q 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert MoElrov 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co . , or Exchang 
on City Banks, When opening accounts send signature ■ 



Securitu Savings Bank. 



INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L. Aboot Jr. 

Wm. Babcook O. D. Baldwin 

Adam Grant W.S.Jones 



! MOHTOOMERY ST.. MILLS BUILDINC 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. MoCutohci 
R. H. Pease 



Continental Building Sc Loan Association ot California 



Established In 1889. 

Subscribed Capital, $8,000,000 

Paid-in Capital - - - 1,3X1,000 



222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Profit and Reserve Fund 1175,00c 
Monthly income, over - - 76,000 



Dr. Ed. E Hill, President. Capt. Oliver Eldbidob, Vloe-Presldent 
Wm. Corbin Secretary and General Manager. 

Crocker- Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post streets. 

Paid-up Capital *i ,000,000 

WM.H. CROCKER... President 

W. E. BROWN Vioe-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

W. GREGG Jr Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E. Brown, C. E. Green, G. W. 
Kline, Hy. J. Crooker, G. W. Scott. 

Germania Trust Go. ot San FranGisGO sleeTIT* 5 

Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, $375,003 

Authorized to aot as Executor, Admlnlstra'or, Guardian, or Trustee. 
Check Accounts of Individuals, Firms, and Corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
Paid on Trust Deposits and Savings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients 

Board of Directors— Ernst A. Denicke. F. Kronenberg, J. C. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro, F. C. Siebe, Albert G. Wieland, H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H 
Bnmner, 

Officers— Erhst A. Denicke, President, F. Kronenberg, Vice-p esfdent 
H. Brunner, Cashier. 



July, 32 I899. 



FRANCISCO MKWB LliTTKR. 



*5 



1«e fto: )ftK 




LOVE, THE VICTOR — c««»im «««o» row«. 1* r« «x»*i» 

TI.MK was. 11 love, when I a vassal knell. 
Obedient at the footstool of thy throne; 
When all my life was thine, yea, every thought. 
Thy very own. 

Yet when I hungered most and prayed thai thou 

Woiildst give to me some little that I gave. 
Thou didst but mock me. knowing what I was— 

Thy willing slave. 
Vet, tho' fast bound in shackle and in chain. 

Pride rose in me and thou wert cast aside; 
And long 1 blessed the day when thon from me 
Went forth and died. 

How long ago it was I broke my thrall I 

How long since I have kept apart from thee. 
Vowing that nevermore I'd bow 'neath thy 
Supremacy. 

And yet to-day I felt the old desire, 

After long years of freedom from thy reign ; 
And I have thought that once more I could love 
Despite the pain. 

No strength of mine can hold thee back. O Love ! 

1 thought that I was safe beyond thy will; 
Bat after long, long years, lo 1 here am I 
Obedient still I 



THE CELEBRANTS — by carolyd wells, in scribher's 

With a shout of joy the rocket stars 

Shot up through the evening air. 
Triumphantly they reached the sky 

And the stars of God were there. 
" Make way!" the rocket stars cried out. 

''Make way and give us place! 
We have a mission to perform, 

We've traveled leagues of space. 
We're sent up here to celebrate 

A glorious country's birth — 
Make way 1 But a moment we can stay, 

Ere we die and fall to earth." 

Then spake the old and kindly stars, 

'■'Ye be bright, oh rocket-spawn, 
But we are here since the morning stars 

Sang at Creation's dawn. 
By the Master Hand we were hurled on high 

To celebrate the day. 
We, too, but shine for the moment Time, 

And then we fade for aye. 
But have your way, oh tiny sparks, 

And while ye may, shine on." 
Ere the kindly voices ceased to speak. 

The rocket stars were gone. 



WHITE BIRCHES— FROM "WITHIN THE HEDOE-" BY MARTHA OILBERTDIOKINSON- 
DOUBLEDAY & M*CLURE CO-, PUBLISHERS- 

Dare not the shadows of a hooded road 

That lures thy step within a certain wood, 
Where nightfall makes her chosen lone abode 

And Nature's faithful children find her good ; 
For 'mid the properness of greenery, 

Where weary days outstretched in slumber lie — 
Darkness and dreams in sober wedlock be 

Hashed decorous beneath a summer sky- 
Flaunt the White Birches, mocking ways of sleep; 

Wakeful and eager for thy pleasuring, 
Their white feet turned to forest revels deep— 

Their white arms waving wistful— beckoning 1 
Daughters of joy I To whose remote embrace 

Young moons prefer their silver gallantries, 
And roaming night winds lay a tender face, — 

Soft indiscretions, shamed by blameless trees 1 

However steadfast beat his blood, and be he loth or be he fain— 
Who once hath trembled after these, down paths of dusk will 
seek again 

Their youth-illumined witcheries! 
For leafy measures trod in gauze— elusive laughter, elfin sighs,— 
No mortal venturing his troth but will wear moonshine in his eyes, 
Fee to his sisters of the moth who flit at every sylvan gnise, 



BANKING. 



London and San Francisco Bank. Limited. 

Oapttal8\ib*cilo*d Md F-iiir I'* fl 

N Rideout. Managing Diraotor 

Guatav Friaderich, Caahiar 

Arthur L Black, Assistant Cashier 

I London 
PORTLAND URANcn - Chamber of Commerce Building 

TACOMA BRANCH USA Pact no arenuo 

Bankers— BsDk of EnjMnti.l London Joint Stock Bank, Limited. 

A (roots Id New York— J F. Morgan A Co 

This hank la prepared to grant letters of credit available In any part of 
the world and to transact every description or Banking and Exchange 
tnntnen. 

Bank ol California, San Francisco. 

Capital. 13,000.000 Surplus. II. 000.000 

Profit and Loss Account. January 1, IBM, 12, 150,028 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP.. VlcePres't 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith... AbsH Cashier 1 1. F. Moolton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, NBA. 
BALTiMORE--The National Exchange Bank. Boston— National Shaw- 
mut Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Loots— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nov.)— Agenoy of The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. do Roths- 
child Freres, Berlin— Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschart. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit issued available In all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

532 California Street. 

D jposits July t, 1899 $24,920,395 Reserve Fund $905 315 

Patd-Up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 442,763 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DbFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHJTE, Cashier. R. M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors: George W- Beaver, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, Al- 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, George 
Tasheira, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms and 
Farming Lands In the Country. 

Receives Deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Expresa, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt cf the money. 

No charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. , and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

The German Savings and Loan Societu- 

No. 526 CALIFORNIA Street, San Francisco 
Guarantee capital and surplus. . . .$2 187,6i7.90 
Capital actually paid up in cash.. 1,000 000 00 

Deposits June 30, 1899 27,656,513 03 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President, B. A. Beoker; First Vloe-Presi- 

dent, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. 

R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George 

Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H, Muller; General Attorney, W. S. 

Goodfellow. 

Ign. Steinhart, E. Ronte, H. B. Russ, D. N. Walter, N. Ohlandt 

and John Lloyd. 

Wells Fargo & Go. Bank. 

N. E. CORNER S ANSOMB & SDTTER STtiEETS 

John J. Valentine President 

HomerS. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Ltpman Assistant Cashier 

H. L. Miller Sd Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus »8. 250.000 

BRANCHES. 

N.Y. Olty.H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. MoCook, John 

Benplngham, Dudley Evans. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited* 

N.W. Cor. Sansomh & Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 82,600,000 

Paid Up Capital 82,000,000 

Reserve Fund 8 850,000 

Head Office , 40 Threadneedle Street, London, E. C 

AGENTS— New York— Ageney of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street,N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Potsson iere. Draw direct on the principal oities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

WORTHINGTON AMES, 

nember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Tel. Black 2026. 



Broker in Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities. 

138 Montgomery St., S. F. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July , 1899. 



A GREAT COFFER FIELD 



THOUSANDS OF ACRES OF RICH DEPOSITS.— THE 
PROPERTY OF THE BOSTON AND TEXAS COP- 
PER COMPANY.— ITS ROMANTIC HISTORY AND 
DISCOVERY. 



In 1863, during the late civil war between the states, when almost 
every man in the State of Texas, between the ages of fifteen and fifty 
years, who was physically able to serve his country, was in the Con- 
federate Army, and the Comanche, Kiowa and Apache Indians 
made frequent forays into what is now the most prosperous and 
populous section of Texas, Col. J. B. Barry, in command of a 
battalion of Texas rangers, pursued these predatory savages into 
what is now Archer Co. ; then a beautiful picturesque terra incognita 
' of gentle undulating hill and dale, covered with wild flowers and 
nutritious grasses, upon which were fattened thousands of wild deer, 
antelope and buffalo, making it a favorite hunting ground of the 
nomadic, primeval red man. 

A severe battle was fought, after closing in with the Indians, in 
which through greater prowess and equipment, the Texans were, as 
usual victorious. When about to break camp, copper ore of the 
richest quality was found scattered ail over an area of twenty-five to 
thirty square miles, on the surface of the ground and imbedded in 
the surface clay, and extending several feet below, ranging in size 
from a pea to a goose egg. Also in solid veins running from the sides 
of the hills, and where the soft alluvial soil had been washed away 
by rains, the ore veins, protruding from the hillside without support. 
would break off and roll to the foot of the hill in chunks from two to 
five hundred pounds in weight each, and sometimes as large as a 
man's body; until, at the time of thediscovery.it was estimated that 
there had thus accumulated two thousand tons of copper. It was 
found also in the blue clay, which beginning at or within a few inches 
of the surface, would extend in depth from eight inches to eight feet. 
T-is latter was apparently almost exhaustless in quantity for what- 
ever excavations were madea few inches deep, this copper bearing clay 
was always found. A wagon load of the ore was hastily gathered, 
and hauled to Austin, the capital of tbe state, some three hundred 
miles distant, and assayed by Prof. De Ryee, who was then and for 
many years after, the State Geologist and Chemist of Texas. His 
assay of the ore yielded from 43>£ to 78% per cent, copper, and the 
copper bearing clay an average of about 15 per cent, with an indefin- 
ite quantity of silver, gold, nickel, cobalt azurite and malachite. A 
percussion gun cap factory was at once erected at Austin, and 
operated successfully by Prof. De Ryee; and from that time to the 
close of the Civil war, in May, 1865, nearly all the percussion caps 
and fulminating material used in the Confederate Army were sup- 
plied from these copper deposits. 

State Geologist, Wm. De Ryee, was sent to investigate the source 
and volume of these copper deposits, and he reported that proper 
development would demonstrate the existence of the greatest deposits 
of copper, the cheapest mined, the easiest smelted, and that would 
pav the largest net profit of any in the United States. At the Isbell 
lead or mine, which had been opened, he made a cross cut about 15 
feet, and in ten hours work, with 4 men, raised 6,000 pounds of ore, 
averaging 00 per cent , leaving more than as much again in small 
broken chunks, and nodules, aggregating some 7 or 8 tons, or about 
1900 pounds to the foot. He also found extensive deposits of similar 
ores and clays at various other places on the property, notably at 
the Douglas, Ball, and Winn leads, showing the great diversity of the 
deposits, these four main leads being miles apart. 

Prof. Wm. P. Cummins, wuo was, during four consecutive admin- 
istrations of the State's Government, in charge of the geological 
bureau of the state of Texas, and who subsequently examined the 
property, confirmed Prof. De Ryee's report, and said: "The copper 
ore is practically on the surface. No great shafts to sink at enormous 
costs, no flooding of the mines by water to contend with ; the ore, in- 
stead of passing through 7 different metallurgical processes, passes 
through only two inexpensive ones, and instead of yielding only two 
to five per cent, of copper, as in some of the greatpayingmines.it 
yields from 60 to 70 percent, while the clay alone, running from eight 
inches to eight feet thick, yields 2 to 28 per cent. , an average of per- 
haps quite 15 per cent., and instead of requiring millions of dollars 
for a plant to extract the metal, it will be lixiviated and precipitated 
by chemical means at insignificant expense." 

" After tbe most careful and thorough examination of this property 
at different times for years past, my conviction is firm that no 
rational reason exists why a very great mine may not be developed 
on the property , that would very soon return most gratifying results 
to the stockholders." 

The Federal Government at Washington, having learned of the 
existence of this copper ore, the Secretary of the Interior sent an ex- 
ploring commission under charge of Prof. Roessler, a most compet- 
ent, experienced officer, who made as complete an investigation as 



the hostile Indians would then permit. His report was exceedingly 
interesting, and fully sustained the positions taken by Professors 
De Ryee and Cummins. It can be found in extenso in tne geological 
reports of the U. S. Government. 

Major G. Nelson Smith, late paymaster-general in the Q. S. Army, 
and for a number of years a Senator from Philadelphia, in the legis- 
lature of Pennsylvania, visited the property several times, hauled 
hundreds of tons of copper ore from the surface of the ground a dis- 
tance of several hundred miles by wagon to the then nearest railroad, 
and then shipped it by rail about 2,500 miles to the copper smelters 
at Baltimore and Phcenixville, where it was pronounced the finest 
copper in existence, and sold for from $250 to $400 per ton. 

Prof. T. A. Genth, then consulting and analytical chemist of the 
University of Pennsylvania, and afterwards its president, assayed 
about 31,000 pounds of ore out of different shipme nts mada by Sena- 
tor Smith, which he certified averaged about 62 per cent, pure 
copper. 

The land is also valuable for farming and stock raising. The soil 
consists of a dark, chocolate-colored loam, remarkably fertile and 
producing vast crops of corn, cotton, sorghum, wheat, oats and other 
cereals, potatoes, fruits of every variety, and grapes equal to the best 
in California or Italy. The climate is almost perfection, being a 
happy medium between the long, bleak winters of the north, and the 
almost perpetual summer of the extreme south. The elevation above 
the sea is about 1,200 feet, assuring perfect comfort and health the 
year round, such a thing as sunstroke or prostration never having 
been beard of. 

The property was profitably worked for several years after the 
discovery of copper, and large amounts of the metal marketed in 
Baltimore and Philadelphia, at a time when the ore had to be hauled 
by wagons from 150 to 300 miles to a railroad, and only discontinued 
when the surface ore had been marketed; minium and a plant to 
work the ore on the ground, became necessary. As in the early days 
of California gold mining, the time came that expense was necessary 
and it was not all profit work stopped. These same California mines, 
taken up subsequently by men of capital and enterprise, are now the 
most profitable of all and pay millions of dollars per year in divi- 
dends. 

This great property for the control of which a million dollars was 
once refused, has been held by the owners for a favorable market 
and awaiting the development of a proper method for treating the 
mineral contents economically on a large scale. The Boston and 
Texas Copper Company has secured the property and a system for 
treating the ores and clays successfully employed at Mansfield, Ger- 
many, for hundreds of years on similar deposits, and will operate it 
for all there is in it. 

The deeds for this property call for 12,274 acres as patented by the 
State, but it is believed it will survey nearly 20,000 acres. It is some 
m;.m miles wide and 10 to 12 miles long, and the equivalent of nearly 
1,000 ordinary mines or mining claims. The highest expert and 
engineering authorities pronounce it one of the greatest copper pro- 
perties in the world, and it is believed it will prove equal to the 
Calumet and Hecla, which has paid over $60,000,000 in dividends, 
and returned $500 for every dollar paid in on the stock. 

Copper mining is so uniformly successful and profitable that few 
know any thing of the industry except the fortunate holders of securi- 
ties. Over 500,000,000 pounds of copper is now produced in America, 
worth $60,000,000, or within 10 per cent of our total gold product, and 
this enormous production, netting $25,000,000 to the owners annually, 
is by about twenty properties, located in small territories in Texas, 
Utah, Michigan Montana, California and Arizona. Tbe latter pro- 
duces 110,000,000 lbs., and the Boston and Texas Company's great 
property is on the same geographical line. 

No industry equals copper mining in stability, prompt and uni- 
formly successful results. It is the safest and best American invest- 
ment. The principal companies pay from 15 to 400 per cent per 
annum dividends, and the future is more promising even than the 
past by reason of the constantly increasing use of copper. 

A portion of the full paid unassessable stock of the Boston and 
Texas Copper Company which controls this great property may be 
secured at $5.00 per share (par $10) to provide additional money for 
plant and development; and it is believed that the company will soon 
be on a dividend paying basis, when the stock now offered at $5.00 
per share, will be worth par and more. The shares of the Calumet 
and Hecla Company which once sold in Boston at one dollar per 
share are now worth eight hundred dollars per share. 

It is announced that the price will be advanced as soon as the 
amount is sold that is set aside for this purpose and it is believed the 
stock will have a large value. 

Hon. Emery M. Low, Mayor of Brockton, Mass.. is president of 
the company, George W. Russell, Esq., paper manufacturer, Boston, 
vice president, Ma}or F. M. Spaulding, 2d vice president and financial 
agent, Col. Edward B. Robins, treasury, Col. James M. Wbeaton, 
Boston, Secretary, and its directors are composed of strong men. 

The company's offices are 411 and 412 Tremont Building, Boston, 
Mass. 

Remit by Check, P. O. Order or Registered Letter for stock desired 
to the Treasurer. Prospectus, reports and full information on 
application. 



July 22, 1899. 



SAN FR ■ m:\VS LETTER. 



*7 



INSURANCE. 

A I awes, once at the head of th. 

. ifornia Agency departn 1 I 
■. practic.i mer of tbi 

,i broken down old man*. He has many f ri. 
this . 

T. T. Frith has accepted a position as special acent 
under Wm. J. Laml. 

Frank Young is now established at Salt Lake as special 
agent for Voss, Conrad A Co. 

tier, of Butler A Haldan, has recovered 
from an attack of typhoid fever. 

The examination of the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance 
Company by the Commissioner of Insurance of the 
of Missouri has been completed. The Commissioner has 
returned home without making a report. 

On Friday evening the Quarterly meeting and dinner of 
the San Francisco Life Underwriters' Association took 
place at the California Hotel. About fifteen covers were 
laid. 

Manager Godwin of the Preferred Accident has returned 
from a visit to Washington. 

The Mutual Reserve'Fund Life Association, the largest 
assessment company in the United States, has established 
itself on a legal reserve basis, following the example of the 
Fidelity Mutual Life Association, and others 

J. N. Russell, secretary of a Denver life insurance com- 
pany, is visiting California. 

George C. Pratt is in Massachusetts. 

J. W. G. Cofran, formerly manager with H. K. Belden 
of the Hartford, but now of Chicago, is visiting San 
Francisco. 

The marriage of Leslie A. Wright to Mrs. Charlotte C. 
Moulder was solemnized on the evening of July 12th at the 
First Unitarian Church, Rev. Horatio Stebbins officiating. 
Mr. Wright is acting general agent of the Sun Insurance 
office. 

Manager Purcell of the Sun Fire Office is in the city and 
will appoint a manager for the Coast Department, vice 
W. J. Callingham, deceased. 

H. Folger has returned from a trip East. 

L. L. Bromwell is spending his vacation at Mill Valley. 

H. E. O'Brien has been made a special agent of the New 
Zealand Fire Insurance Company under Manager Thomas. 

The Independent Fire Adjusters Association of the 
Pacific has been organized by A. R. Gurry, Robt. H. 
Naunton, D. A. Spencer, A. A. Andre, Calvert Meade, 
F. G. Argall and E. P. Farnsworth. E. P. Farnsworth 
is president; F. G. Argall, vice president; and R. H. 
Naunton, secretary. 

Insist Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 
Other Eastern Cities read over the Nickel. Plate (N. Y. C. &'St. 
L. R. R.), the popular low-rate short line. Quick time, unexcelled 
accommodations, and no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adama, 
Pacific Coast Passenger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. P., deals 
in all kinds of newspaper Information, business, personal, political, from 
pressot State, Coast, and Country. Tel. Main 1042. 

You never have a "head" In the morning from drinking Jesse Moore 
"AA" Whiskey. 

A well developed appetite for Napa Soda is a good certificate of character 
In looking over the card of liquid re freshm ents do not forget. Napa Soda 

Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insuranoe. 

HOME INSURANCE CO. OF NEW YORK 2&8:i»uft* 

H. L. Roff, General Agent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well organized, competent, and experienced force of Gen 
kral and Special Agents resident in the Paclfio Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents und the in- 
p 'j;:ng public, and Immediate Attention to the adjustment and Pay- 
faflNT of Losses. _____ 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Dp 81,000.000 

Total Assets 3 702.300 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 2,112,546 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 

COLIN M. BOYD. 9 ^Z^ aiSDoAgeD U. 




*_m~ iwuuiim im £b |_Bk 

Cftpiui Subscribed |4 4S2 TOO 

LONDON ASSURANCE, cpu.ip.ia up i,Hi,ni 

A««ou 1S.195.14S 

CpU.l Subscribed gg OOO OOO 

OCEAN MARINE. c.pu.ip.ia up Wooo 

A«boU a 3Q3,ogo 

IN S U R ANGE. 

FIRE, MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OP SAN PRANCISCO OAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000 

PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (Llmltea), OP MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

OHAS. A. LATON, Manager 489 California St., S. P. 
PlRIIHSDRAKCI. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. LIMITED 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

O.plt.l $6,700,000 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 816 California St., S. P 



Pounded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Gompanu ol North America 

OT PHILADELPHIA, PENH. 

Paid-up Capital 18,000,000 

SurpluBto Polloy Holders 6,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., 8. F. 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1726. 

Capital Paid Up, »8,446,100. Assets, 123,879,868. 

Surplus to Polloy Holders, »9,851 324. 

PRANK W DICKSON, Ass't Manager. 

501-503 Montgomery St., corner Sacramento. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY, °» NEW z«a-_<»- 

Capital $5,0 00,000 

UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS. 
Office in company's building, 312 California street. 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager. 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established ww. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. i»°orpor.ted 1799 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

418 California St., S. F. 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital, 12,250.000 Assets, (10,984.248. 
Paciflo Coast Department: 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. P. 

VOSS, CONRAD is CO., General Manager.. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



July 22, 1899. 



Copper Shares 



Safest Investment, Largest Dividends. 



A portion of the fuli-paid and non-assessable capital stock of the 
Boston & Texas Copper Company is offered for sale at Five Dollars 
per share (par $10 for Treasury purposes), and is recommended as a 
safe and highly promising investment. 

The company controls twelve thousand acres of rich copper land 
in North Texas which is also valuable for farming and town site pur- 
poses. The tract is some 10 miles long and about three miles wide. 
It is equivalent in size to five hundred ordinary mining claims. 

The property has been developed sufficiently to begin producing at 
once, large amounts of the richest copper ore (40 to 70 per cent.) 
taken out and marketed, and inexhaustible quantities of copper 
marl and clay running from 3 to 15 per cent copper found. (Calumet 
and Hecla and other great dividend payers are working on 1 to 3 
per cent ore.) 

The property is within 12 miles of a railroad and fuel and water 
are available. The ores and marl are on the surface and a few feet 
down, and can be mined and converted into copper cheaper than any 
other deposits in America. Copper will be produced on the ground 
and a plant of moderate cost will treat 300 to 500 tons of ore and 
material per day, and according to engineers' estimates earn $3000 to 
$5000 per day net, with copper at 15 cents per pound. It is now 18 
cents per pound. 

The property has a historical reputation and a record in the State 
Geological Reports. It has been examined and reported upon by the 
highest engineering, geological and expert authorities, and its merit 
and value are established beyond all question. It is not an experi- 
ment, nor its value speculative, they are proven and demonstrated. 

From Report of Prof. Wm. DeRyfie, former State Chemist of Texas 

" Such numerous outcrops of copper ore have been traced over the 
summit and sides of those hills that out of 12.000 acres of land which 
the company own, hardly a 100 acre tract should be found without 
ore upon the surface. 

A cross-cut to the depth of 15 feet was made upon the Isbell lead, 
and ten hours' work resulted in the raising of (>000 lbs. of rich copper 
ore, averaging about 60 per cent of copper. (Worth $360, net). 

It is easily smelted and the strata in which it is found can also be 
more economically excavated than other in which copper ores occur." 

From Report of Prof. W. F. Cummins, former Geologist of Texas. 

* * * ,l In order that I might see the condition of this lode after 
this amount of work had been done, I employed a few hands and 
cleaned out the tunnels when I found a lode of copper. This is the 
disulphate of copper and will yieid as high as 70 per cent of copper. 
1 drove the tunnel twenty feet further into the bill, following the 
lode. When I had gone about twelve feet I struck another lode of 
copper eighteen inches east and six inches below the second lode. In 
three feet more we struck another lode below the second lode. Im- 
mediately below the lower sandstone is a stratum of cupriferous marl 
schists extending the entire width of the tunnel, say four feet, and is 
probably much wider. This marl will yield about 15 per cent of cop- 
per." 

from Report of Prof. Gustave Westman, Mining Engineer. 

" I beg to express my entire satisfaction with and confidence in the 
report made by Prof. W. F. Cummins. 

1 only had to remove one foot of earth from the surface on the 
three spots already mentioned in order to find large deposits bedded 



into the clay. After washing, this clay was found to contain 15 pe r 
cent of copper ore of same value as above. These ores could of 
course be taeen out and made available at a relatively small expense. 
The cupriferous marl situated below the sandstone, containing 15 
per cent of copper, can be estimated worth at the place at least $10 
per ton, net." 

From Report of George F. Rendall, Mining Engineer. 

" It is a self-evident fact deducible from every report that on this 
property large bodies of copper ore exist and that hundreds of tons 
have been shipped of high grade ore. 

That a deposit of this nature can at a very small expense be made 
to yield handsome profits, from all existing reports, appears not 
only likely but certain." 

From Report of Francis Arthur Reall, Superintendent. 

" This property is all right, and there is all the copper you want 
here. 1 think it is the best in Texas and it seems to have been 
selected as such for copper. It is near the top of a watershed and 
the hills crop out here. I think there is oil here because there is coal. 
Oil has been found at Corsicana. The property is adapted to general 
farming purposes which seems to be very profitable here, and a town 
could be laid out on it and a railroad built to Dundee, 12 miles, to 
great advantage." 

The Great Boom in Copper Shares. 

Copper mining has proved the safest and most profitable industry 
in America, and the largest and most conservative capitalists in the 
world have recently become large investors in copper stocks. 

This company can produce copper as cheaply as any in the world. 
It is capitalized the lowest of any in proportion to its acreage, and at 
the price of copper-bearing land in Michigan ($400 per acre) contain- 
ing a much less per cent nf copper, has a large value in excess of its 
low capitalization ($2,500,000). 

Receipts for ore aud assays by the leading chemists and assayers 
in the country are on file in the company's offices. 

The officers and directors of the company are men of the highest 
standing arid business capacity, aud include: 

Hon. Emery M. Low, manufacturer, mayor of Brockton, Mass., 
President. 

George W. Russell, Esq., paper manufacturer, Boston, Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

Major F. M. Spaulding, Second Vice-President. 

Col. Edward B. Robins, Boston, Treasurer. 

Col. James M. Wheaton, Boston. Secretary. 

Hon. Jas. W. Bennett, Ex-President Erie Telephone Co. 

Only a limited amount of the stock will be sold at the price of $5 
per share and those wishing to secure shares should act at once. As 
stated, the stock is full-paid and non-assessable. As soon as this 
allottment is s*old the price will be advanced. 

Amount of land, quantity and quality of ore, cheapness of mining 
and treatment, nearness to transportation, favorable climate for con- 
tinuous work the year around, the increasing demand and profit in 
producing copper considered, the Boston and Texas Copper Company 
possesses unequaled advantages and affords the best kind of an in- 
vestment. It can easily earn 50 per cent per year on the price at 
which the stock is here offered. 

Stock may be ordered through your banker or broker, or direct as 
below. 



FROM REPORT OF T. BURTON EVERETT, MINING ENGINEER AND EXPERT. 

Archer City, Texas, May 3. 1899, 
Hon. Emery H. Low, President, and others, Boston. Mass.: * * Gentlemen — There is abundant evidence of rich copper deposits, not only at the mines 
already opened, but at various other parts of the property, and it is my opinion that this will prove to be one of the exceptionally rioh copper-bearing 
fields of the United States. 

* * The ores f-'Und in these deposits are immensely rich in copper values and the cupriferous clays thai are also found here in immense beds, while not 
as rich, will und< ubtedly prove of great value on account of the rheapness with which they can be mined and reduced. 

The m'nes are accessible at every point; the cost of mining will be very small, as the ore is not in hard formation; and there is no deep work. 
I have examined the various reports mode by others, and confirm ihem. 

* * As far as I have been able to investigate, and I have done so carefully, I am of the opinion it is one of the richest copper fields in the country 

Very respectfully yours. T. Burton Everett. M. E. 

Mr. G. H Savage. Mine Examiner of Butte. Montana, arter gaining sample of ore from the prop?rty, says: "The ore is the richest in the country. If 
you have the flela you can p^y Jl.OOU uoo dividends per year." 

Major F. M. Spaulding. of Boston, and C. F. Crosby, Esq., of Lowell. Mass., who returned June 16th from an examination of the property on behalf of 
the Company's stockholders and intending investors, report that they found the propeny as represented and confirm the expert reports. They visited 
aid examined the nine mines and explored the entire property. 

The Company is thoroughly organized with substantial business men In the management. It has such extensive acre- 
age of land, rich in copper, and so easily and cheaply mined and converted, that dividends can be earned and paid during 
the current year. Now is the time to make a safe and profitable investment, and those who take advantage of this 
opportunity to buy stock at the low price offered will reap the benefit. 



Remit by P. O. Order, Registered Letter, Check 
Robins, Treasurer, Tremont Building, Boston. Mass. 
ject to advance, 

BOSTON & TEXAS COPPER CO. 



or Express to Edward B. 
Price $5 per share, sub- 



WITH S P, NEWS LETTER 



cJULY 29. 1899 




TEMPLE EMANUEL, SUTTER STREET, SAN FRANGI8G0. 



m*4 par C*pt. M CWi 



E8TABUSHC0 JULY W, ISM. 




NEVSS J&ETTER 

California XiUvcvtiscr. 




Vol.LVIX. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 29, 1899. 



Number 4. 



Prim ed and published every Saturday by the proprietor, FR Kit MARRIOTT 
SVt Kearny street, Sam FrancUco. Entered at Sam Francisco Post, 
ope* as Second-class Matttr. 

The office 0/ the SKWS LSTTSR in Xtw York OUy is at Temple Court, 
{040. A. Kellogg, Kastern Representative f t irhere information maybe 
obtained regarding subscription and advertising rate*. 

Alt toeial item*, announcement*, adrcrtieing. or other matter, fnffflrffrf for 
publication tn the current number of the XKH'S LFTTf-'t. 

'o this office not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 



ft 



MOTION is in order to puree the democracy of the 
malodorous trio — Buckley, Rainey, and the Examiner. 

AN apt illustration of the devil denouncing sin is af- 
forded by the Examiner preaching virtue through its 
"Bible-class." ' 

BY the abatement of the Hotel Nymphia nuisance, the 
moral atmosphere of North Beach has been clarified; 
but the denizens of the district should remember that vigi- 
lance is the price of decency. 

THAT it is possible to hold with the hare and run with 
the hounds is practically demonstrated on the eve of 
the primaries by the politician whom the people applaud 
for denouncing the boss he secretly serves. 

EIGHTEEN thousand applications for pensions are on 
file in Washington on account of the late war with 
Spain. How many millions will that conflict have cost by 
the time the next half-century is completed? 

WHEN the ten thousand departing teachers took their 
feet off Los Angeles, the elastic pavement sprang 
back to the normal level with a suddenness that jarred 
the city and led to the ridiculous story of "earthquakes" 
in orange-land. 

O'ER Killarney's lakes and fells, emerald isles and wind- 
ing bays, mountain paths and woodland dells, a New 
York manufacturer sways. For Muckross lands and 
ruins old, and parks where deer oft fled the hounds, A. G. 
Peck poured out in gold £37,000. 

FOR the display of products ol the vine, California will 
be allowed two- thirds of the wine-exhibit space of the 
United States at the Paris Exposition, affording an un- 
paralleled opportunity of securing universal recognition of 
the surpassing merit of our Golden State wines. 



THAT Brother Jonathan has made tremendous strides 
in the Par East is the testimony of a citizen of this 
country who recently rode into Manchuria over a railroad 
made with American tools, with rails rolled in Philadelphia, 
fastened to sleepers from Oregon by track-laying tools of 
Yankee make; an American engine pulling the train of 
American construction. 

GENERAL Joe Wheeler, who prefers the roar of battle 
to the music of peace, is reported as saying that "he 
does not consider the possession of the Philippines expan- 
sion." It makes a difference when a man talks through a 
General's commission. Our withdrawal from the Philip- 
pines, nevertheless, would comprehend an expansion of Mc- 
Kinley politics into true Republicanism. 

IP trusts are the natural evolution of a greater and 
broader industrial progress; if their economy in organi- 
zation will bring about a reduction in prices, increase the 
wages of labor, and make us all prosperous, the scheme 
ought to be carried to perfection by incorporating the 
whole nation into one sublime trust whose motto should be 
'The greatest good to the greatest number." 



LET volunteers returning from Manila be mustered out 
in the States which gave them to the service of their 
country. Then there will arise no tale of veterans stranded 
by the Golden Gate; the local labor market will not again 
be overrun, and we shall be spared a repetition of the 
Midwinter Fair aftermath, wherein armies of the unem- 
ployed marched the streets clamoring for work or bread. 

BRITISH newspapers indulge in high praise of the 
American collegians who suffered defeat at the bands 
of the Oxford and Cambridge athletes. It would appear 
that the Yankee lads, by their loss, had won the esteem 
of England. Columbia, however, would prefer to hear the 
old-familiar voice of jealous criticism disturbing the echoes 
in the wake of American victories over the sons of Albion. 



BROOKLYN'S trolley strike yielded a newspaper sen- 
sation, and then died out without serious results to 
corporations or employes. When the police had silenced 
those professional trouble-breeders known as the "walk- 
ing delegates," common-sense quickly resumed her seat, 
sweet peace smiled over the scene, and simultaneously the 
electric cars began to buzz and business to hum. 

OOM PAUL, sturdy, stolid, tenacious and true to his 
country, has developed a new trait. He tendered 
his resignation of the Presidency of the Transvaal in order 
to bring his subjects to his own views. The shrewd old 
man had no idea of vacating. He simply played a game 
of bluff. A vote of confidence hastily followed his intention 
of retiring from public life, and for the present at least he 
will continue to twist the tail of the British lion. 

STAND forth, Elihu, thou man of quiddits and quillets, 
of tenures and of tricksl Stand forth, thou chosen of 
the God of War, and teach the world how necessary to the 
martial role is an acquaintance with the code provisions 
on assault and battery! If thou rememberest the people, 
thou wilt be a square Root, Elihu; but if thou considerest 
only the administration, thou wilt be a cube Root, with six 
faces, and no better than a war-club of Michigan lumber. 

WITH death in several forms staring them in the face, 
the army of deputies and clerks at the City Hall 
should be commended for heroic self-sacrifice. Deadly 
sewer-gas and murderous monoxide continuously assail 
their citadels of life, but never a man of them throws up 
his jobl Martyr-like, they fight to remain as long as the 
appropriations hold out, in order that other and better 
men may be kept away from the dangers and the salaries. 

BOSTON'S prestige in the realm of culture has waned 
perceptibly, till now, like a woman piqued, she turns 
upon mankind and threatens to confirm the theory that 
our forefathers were troglodytes and wove their lairs from 
jungle twigs. She is teaching an ourang-outang to talk 
a human language, and expects the educated simian to 
solve the question of the "missing link." Having lost her 
place on the band wagon, Dame Boston is willing to make 
a monkey of herself for a seat on a music-box. 

R TORPEDO-BOAT was launched on the Tyne a few 
days ago which is confidently expected to be able to 
attain a speed of thirty-seven knots, or forty-three miles, 
an hour 1 This boat is called the Viper, and is to be fitted 
with the new turbine engine. The trials are being looked 
forward to with unusual interest, as the introduction of 
turbine engines is at no distant date expected to revolu- 
tionize steam shipping. If all that is claimed for them 
shall prove to be true, it is not unlikely that we shall be 
able to cross the Atlantic Ocean within 72 hours. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1899. 



ROBERT GREEN INGERSOLL 

ROBERT Green Ingersoll, according to the gloomy 
doctrine of the materialist, has gone "to be a brother 
to the insensible ciod which the rude swain turns with his 
plow and treads upon." In the mind of the famous 
agnostic, there seemed to be, not altogether hidden, not 
altogether suppressed, an almost complete assurance of 
an after-death existence, and to the hearts of the sorrow- 
stricken loved ones now taking their last farewell of the 
clay that once was Ingersoll, the word breathed by the 
departed over the grave of his brother years ago must 
come as a ray of holy comfort: "In the night oir death 
hope sees a star, and listening love can hear the rustle of 
a wing." 

Ingersoll was idolized by the few as the apostle of unbe- 
lief, and condemned by the many as the enemy of scriptura 1 
truth and divine revelation. To the Christian and Jewish 
world he was an iconoclast — one who would tear away the 
sole efficient support that frail mortality has leaned upon 
since the morning stars sang together; one who would tear 
away that prop and leave mankind helpless in the mire.of 
a purposeless world amid the blackness of despair. 

The few hailed him as a torch-bearer of mental pro- 
gress; the many, as a friend of darkness who would fain 
extinguish the light of truth. The ideas be advanced in 
his war upon creeds were not original with him; he simply 
dressed the sophistry of the past in an attractive modern 
garb, and struck at religion with weapons forged ages 
ago by skeptics of the French and German schools. The 
theories he preached as against the autheuticity and con- 
sistency of the Bible had been exploited and refuted a 
hundred years before his birth. 

Although his borrowed arguments against the immort- 
ality of the soul, equally brilliant and illogical, were bat- 
tered to pieces by such profound thinkers as William 
Ewart Gladstone, Jeremiah Black and Father Lambert, 
he continued to repeat the old-time fallacies which consti- 
tuted his stock in trade as a platform orator; while un- 
thinking individuals who arrogate to themselves the name 
of "free-thinkers" coutinued to applaud his unsound views 
as if they had never been challenged, and not only chal- 
lenged, but beaten and pulverized. 

Notwithstanding all this, iDgersoll possessed great 
personal magnetism. His presence was •najestic; his elo- 
cution superb. His broad expressive face could portray 
pleasure or pain, pity or anger, with equal facility, and 
his gestures had the studied significance of a finished 
actor. He stood not in the highest rank of lawyers, per- 
haps, but he was a most eloquent pleader at the bar. 
Although neither a great reasonernor a great scholar, he 
covered up his defects before an audience with the tricks 
of a remarkable and resourceful wit. Where he surpassed 
was in the role of a platform orator, and in this resptct 
he had few, if any, equals in his day. 

He will be known in political history as the author of the 
speech nominating "The Plumed Knight" for the Presi- 
dency in 1876; and not forgotten will be his eulogy of 
Lincoln, "the embodiment of the self-denial, the courage, 
the hope and the nobility of the nation." 

Ingersoll has gone the way of all flesh. His private life 
was fraught with many gentle deeds of love, and charity 
now should cover what faults he had like a veil. Take him 
for all in all, he was a man whose like we shall not soon 
again behold. 

Fakers Big "The fool fills the purse of the knave," 
And Little, might well be themotto of that enemy of the 
legitimate business man — the professional 
faker. Sleight-of-hand may be his forte; he may operate 
a shell and ball game, or dispose of gold bricks for their 
weight in silver. You will find him on the pavement ex- 
ploding his trick matches, or expatiating on the merits of 
cheap nostrums, or rattling off the names of barbary 
coast and tenderloin songs that are sold at a nickel a 
pamphlet. His voice rings out from doorways, urging the 
uninitiated to educate themselves at a dime a chance in 
the mysteries that lie hidden behind the gaudy curtains of 
the mountebank. 

The faker dons the mask of patriotism and feathers his 
nest out of the Fourth of July donations, and again we find 



him appealing for a benefit-fund which is calculated to en- 
rich the rogue in the name of some object of charity. 

Those are the lesser lights of fakedom, however. They 
are quite insignificant when compared to that stupendous 
faker who draws the community into one big net, as it 
were, by a scheme that bears the semblance of merit aDd 
honesty, and realizes a fortune in the ransom money. 

The faker who swells his purse with pennies or dimes by 
street-corner operations among the passing throng is a 
harmless jest alongside of that monumental fake-worker, 
the be-diamonded man of elephantine nerve and assurance 
who, like a prince exacting tribute, taxes the people for 
his own enrichment through clever designs, and leads in 
his train, as dupes and figureheads and blinds, men of 
standing in the community who would take offense if ad- 
dressed by a common faker of the pavement. 

San Francisco has proved a most profitable field for this 
past master in the art of faking. His species is not in- 
digenous to our Coast, but it flourishes here, nevertheless, 
like the worst of weeds in the best of soils. Chicago 
emptied a host of smooth gentry into the western oaradise 
during the Midwinter Fair, and the smoothest of these ap- 
pear to have triumphed, like a Caesar of his kind, and to 
be leading bankers and brokers, merchants, lawyers and 
doctors, like so many captives, at his chariot-wheels. 

Our people are generous, sympathetic, charitable, and 
they contribute freely to any worthy cause. It is by tak- 
ing advantage of this noble characteristic that the gigantic 
faker has been able to fill his coffers with the gold that is 
supposed to be used to alleviate woe and put bread in the 
mouths of the hungry poor. 

The faker of the streets performs his business in the 
broad, open light of the day. We know him and the police 
know him, and his power for evil is circumscribed to 
narrow limits. 

But infinitely more injurious to the city at large is the 
professional concocter of schemes that smack of nothing 
so much as plain highway robbery. ■ Our prominent citi- 
zens owe it to the community to withhold the influence of 
their names from enterprises they know nothing about 
save that they have been given to understand that "it is 
a charity." San Francisco needs no fakers from abroad 
to dispense her charities for her. It is not only a crying 
injustice, but a disgrace and an outrage that the money 
given for "charity" should go about seventy-five per cent, 
to the faker and the balance to other expenses. It is time 
the eyes of the citizen were opened in the premises. The 
fake bazaars, fairs, cakewalks, etc. ought to be abolished. 

Looking into the The Merchants' Association is engag- 
City Contracts, ing itself in a good work in looking into 
the various contracts for city supplies. 
Time out of mind the bids have not been proportioned to 
the final payments. The bids of certain contractors for 
articles in not much request have been exceedingly low, 
while goods that are in large demand have been very high. 
By a process of figuring, as original as it is deceptive, the 
higher bidder is made to appear the lower, and gets the 
contract accordingly. It is a scheme of the contractor 
and the men who stand in with him. It means addition, 
subtraction and silence. Men take contracts at lower 
than the market prices, and yet grow abnormally rich. 
But it is not in the bidding process that all the wrong 
lies. There is muoh more of evil in bad qualities and 
short quantities. The city is cheated by obtaining neither 
the quantity nor the quality it pays for. This is especially 
true, unfortunately, at our charitable institutions. At 
the City and County Hospital nothing is up to the standard 
supplied at the time of bidding. Neither the coffee nor 
the tea are what they pretend to be, as may easily be seen 
by examining the waste. The meat is cuts near the Deck, 
as stringy, tough and unsightly as they well can be. Even 
the attendants denounce the evil, and pretty plainly hint 
a.t the cause of it. On visiting days matters are consider- 
ably improved, showing that they might be kept improved 
all the time. There are very few things that appear on 
the bill for luxuries that are ever received by the sick and 
dying patients. A sick inmate may remain in a ward for 
weeks and never see one of his fellow unfortunates receive 
an article classed and paid for as a luxury. Eggs appear 
once in a while, but they are handed to the sick person in 



July »9. 1899. 






tbeir half-cold and urn-racked shell, and ore not olwi 
for human consumption. The oldest-timed Inrooteti have 
seen spirits once in a great while, hut «n > 
cooking on visiting days is not up to the hii-t 

together at 
1, it would pass without gr.n. 
satisfaction Why may it not be made equally good . 
day in the year? Contracting and bidding have 

great and manifold evils in them that ought to be as 
rigidly suppressed as private individuals would undertake 
to do if they appeared in their business. 

A Daemon Important It appears that most, if not oil, 
To irrigators. the irrigation districts are legally 

constituted, and their bonds valid 
and collectable. This results from a recent decision by 
Judge Morrow in the case of George Herring vs. the 
Modesto Irrigation District. Under that decision all 
bonds issued up to within the lost two years are free from 
attack; and since then, as the subject matter has been in 
litigation, few if any bonds have been issued. A total of 
nearly $5,000,000 of indebtedness will thus attach to the 
various districts, and the bondholders will come by their 
own to that amount. It is only fair to the trustees of 
many districts to say that they never favored litigation 
over this matter, but desired to meet every legal and hon- 
orable claim. Of course, they were powerless to inter- 
vene when individual taxpayers chose to test tbeir re- 
sponsibilities in the Courts. In the case at bar, action was 
brought to declare that the Irrigation District of Modesto 
was illegally organized, but Judge Morrow decided that, 
as the district bad been organized and operated as a cor- 
poration under the color of law, and had exercised the 
powers of a municipal corporation, openly and publicly, 
for many years without question or objection, such long- 
continued acquiescence and recognition estops the ques- 
tion of original legality being now raised. The statute 
expressly so declares, and it would be the presumption of 
law in any event. The effects that this decision will pro- 
duce are in every way desirable. The credit of the State 
will be upheld, the Courts will be more highly respected, 
and money in abundance will be forthcoming for the pur- 
poses of irrigation. Judge Morrow has had some very 
knotty points to decide since he reached the United States 
Court of Appeals, but he is handling them with signal 
ability. 

A Curious Constitution for Our California boys will be 
A Philippine Island. receiving their welcome home 
in a very short time now, and 
it is safe to say that none of the volunteers of our various 
States will receive a more rousing time. Our boys were 
among the first to receive their baptism of fire at Cavite. 
Not only did they stand their ground well, but in one of 
the bravest dashes of the whole war rendered material 
assistance in driving the enemy out of Cavite and into the 
far suburbs of Manila. Our men had as much bravery as 
others. They rushed to the front like demons, but therein 
consisted their one fault, which is a good one to find in 
young volunteers. They had not steadiness enough, but 
were always over-eager for a dash, and often when a dash 
was not good military tactics. Had they been given the 
chances of the Nebraskans, the Kansans, or the Utah 
Battery, they would doubtless have won equal renown 
during the whole war. But the risk was looked upon as 
too great. The task in hand needed the steadiest of 
troops. Our men were then given the very choicest piece 
of work that our occupation of the Philippines afforded. 
They were sent to give law and liberty to the friendly 
natives of Negros. Their Colonel, our own "Jim Smith," 
was greater at law than war, and to him was given the 
Governorship of Negros, promotion to a Brigadier-Gen- 
eralship, continued command of the First California Volun- 
teers, and the right to frame a constitution for the island. 
The latter soon became almost his sole occupation. He 
liked it. His heart was in his work. A good lawyer, who 
studied in the office of the late Judge G. W. Tyler, and at- 
tached to California and her laws, he at once proceeded 
to make her constitution, as nearly as possible, fit the 
manners and customs of an interesting section of the 
Filipinos. He has created a State Government, a Legis- 
lature, municipal government for all the small towns. For 



the f)r*t term all the appointment" arc to be mod* brhim 



aon Junge* t roie«- ,trt. or the 

i! on a visit of inspr 
was a- handiwork of t> 

fornian. He thought it went too far. much 

the hands of the Filipinos, and won 
dang* 'ablishing governmn 

other islands. General Smith, however, 
stand by his guns, and declared that as the , 
ratified the contract, it was now good American law. 
The President has since promulgated his assent in Eng- 
lish, Spanish, Tagal and Viscoyan. If it is finally adopted. 
our boys will have been the first home-rulers in the Philip- 
pines, and their commander the writer of the first consti- 
tution for any one of our colonies. 

The Cnanoea Americans are taking it for granted 
Orayfus has or that Dreyfus will be honorably acquitted 
Going Free. and go forth a free man. Their wishes 
are very naturally father to the thought. 
The wretched means taken to procure his conviction, and 
the inhuman cruelties to which he was subjected during 
his confinement on Devil's Island, cause every manly man's 
heart to go out to him in sympathy and affection. It will 
be a sad disappointment if he be not released There are 
many stumbling blocks in his way yet. It is to be remem- 
bered that he is not to be re-tried by a civil court. His 
case is a military one, and must be tried by the same old 
court martial methods. Somehow or other the officers of 
France have got it into their heads that the acquittal of 
Dreyfus means their own condemnation; and in some meas- 
ure it does. Any of those who were concerned in the origi- 
nal charge, trial, conviction on false and forged testimony, 
expatriation to a death-trap, and the cruelties while there, 
will be, and already are, condemned everywhere outside 
of France. But those concerned in the plot are but a few, 
whose condemnation will notconcern any considerable num- 
ber of French officers. Unfortunately, however, the army 
makes the cause of a few of its officers tbeir own, and in 
that case, it is hard to tell what may happen before a mili- 
tary court. The principal ground of hope is that France 
has now a President and cabinet specially constituted to 
end this wretched Dreyfus affair. There will be no rest 
or peace in the country until it is out of the way. There 
are three men in the chief places of power in France to-day 
who will settle the question if any men can. The Presi- 
dent is firm in standing by his cabinet. Waldeck-Reas- 
seau, the new premier, who is an orator and debater of 
skill and experience, may be relied upon to put the case 
before the assembly with matchless force and power. A 
felicitous phrase is often more powerful than a battalion 
at a critical moment in Paris, and a man with a cool head 
at the back of the phrase, is more reassuring than an 
army. But above all the military department is under 
the control of General de Marquis de Gallifet. A veteran 
of better days, he has for some time been shut out of view 
because he is a royalist. His honor is conceded by all 
parties, and his influence with the army is unsurpassed. 
These three men in power are friends of Dreyfus, and in 
them he must rest his principal hope. So far they have made 
no mistakes, and there are no indications that they will. 

S FIXED policy is badly needed in Cuba. We are act- 
ing there within the letter of our mandate, but en- 
terprise languishes, and unrest is promoted by the in- 
definiteness of our occupation of the island. With all pro- 
gress, in relation to granting franchises, stopped by the 
Foraker resolution, with no scheme by which self-govern- 
ment can be definitely fostered, the extremists are given 
an excuse for their vaporings of revolt and renewed de- 
struction. Make an announcement of a ten years' occu- 
pation with a progressive scheme of self-government, and 
the good sense of the vast majority, who long for peace 
and prosperity, will soon put the extremists in their 
proper place. Nothing can be more destructive to mater- 
ial prosperity than uncertainty. It is little less disastrous 
than revolt outright. It destroys security, strangles 
growth, delays improvements, and destroys enterprise. 
There is no proper time in the history of a people for a 
policy of vacilation. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1899. 



The Alaska Sir Wilfred Laurier, the Premier of Canada, 
Boundary. has selected a very unfitting time for bluff- 
ing. There is nothing else in his loud talk 
about war between England and the United States over 
the Alaskan boundary. Those nations have just now more 
important fish to fry than the mere finding of a railroad 
route to Dawson City. They have infinitely greater in- 
terests in common in other parts of the world — in China, 
for instance, and in this particular epoch in the world's 
history it would be a crime for the two most civilized 
nations of the earth to break the peace, and let slip the 
dogs of war, not knowing how and when they could be re- 
called again. The dispute over the boundary question is 
of the paltriest kind. The British have waived the rights 
which the arbitrators at Paris gave them in the Behring 
Sea matter. They have conceded away their monopoly of 
the fishing bait on the Newfoundland coast, and they have 
consented to the taking of unsawn logs out of the forests 
of Canada. They do not concede that the Alaskan bound- 
ary is where we say it is, but they are willing to let it go at 
that, provided that we are willing to give them the right 
of building a telegraph line and a railroad over about fifty 
miles of the disputed territory, so as to gain access to the 
gold fields. They urge with absolute truthfulness that we 
should gain more by the telegraph and the railroad than 
they should. The Klondike buys pretty nearly all the 
merchandise it wants on this side of the border, and most 
of its gold comes either to Seattle or San Francisco. For 
the purposes of trade the Klondike is practically our 
country, and if the British are willing to supply the neces- 
saries of trade, there is no reason why we should say them 
nay. It is a dog in the manger business for us to stand in 
the way. It is not proposed that England shall put any- 
body at a disadvantage as to duties, or fares and freights. 
There can be no war over so paltry a subject. 

Good Being On Monday last the Peace Conference 
Accomplished at The Hague received one of the most 
At The Hague, definite and important reports any of its 
committees has yet prepared. It is to 
be hoped that it will be adopted, and become an inter- 
national law. It declares in favor of an agreement to ab- 
stain from firing projectiles from balloons, or "by other 
new methods;" not to use projectiles intended solely to 
spread noxious sases, and not to use bullets intended to 
spread upon striking the human body. It is to be noted 
that agreement on the report was not unanimous. It may 
be doubted, therefore, if all the participating powers can 
be brought to bind themselves to its terms, especially as 
regards new methods of firing projectiles, and the use of 
the "dum-dum" bullets. But if the conference accomplish 
nothing more definite, it will have illuminated a few pages 
of history, if it adopts the mere declaration, which the 
minority favors, that "a restriction of military burdens, 
will increase the material, and moral welfare of humanity." 
That is where the shoe pinches. Europe is feeling the 
weight of its war burdens, and they are becoming unbear- 
able. The relegation of the standing army to industrial 
employment has got to come at no distant date. Nothing 
less will save the countries of Europe from general 
bankruptcy. 

Some Interesting The Bureau of Statistics at Washing- 
Trade Facts. ton has just issued an advance report 
of the trade and commerce of the 
United States for the first eleven months of the past fiscal 
year. The figures given have a very special interest for 
the Pacific Coast, inasmuch as they show that exports on 
"our ocean" are rapidly advancing, while those on the 
Atlautic are steadily decreasing. Bradstreets figures out 
the percentages in this wise: "Against a decrease of 
3.6 per cent in European takings of our products, has to 
be placed a gain of 12 6 per cent in our shipments (princi- 
pally from the Pacific Coast) to countries of North 
America, 5 5 per cent gain in our shipments to South 
America, 2.6 gain in exports to Asia, 2 3 per cent increase 
to Africa, and, last but not least, a 39 per cent gain to 
Australia, New Zealand, and the isles of the Pacific." 

There is a volume of meaning in those figures. They 
demonstrate that the broad ocean which confronts this 
Queen City of ours, is at last realizing the fulfillment of 
its destiny. Westward the trade of empire is taking its 



way. Increases, some of them very marked ones, dis- 
tinguish our past year's commerce with the countries 
around us. While this is so, our Eastern ports show a 
falling off in trade for the year with Europe. The exports 
to the United Kingdom showed a decrease of $25,000,000, 
to France a decrease of $20,000,000,- to Belgium $4,000,000, 
and to Spain a decrease of $2,000,000. Our total exports 
to Europe, which include wheat, wine, fruit, etc. from the 
Pacific Coast, foot up a total of $868,000,000, while our 
exports to countries bordering on the Pacific amount to 
$263,000,000. Our trade with Europe may well be be- 
lieved to have reached its maximum, whilst that with 
countries of the Pacific is only yet in its infancy. Verily, 
the days of our Salvation draweth nigh! 

The Oregon Boys It is impossible not to be struck with 
On Our Streets. the healthy, dapper appearance of 
Oregon's volunteers, fresh from the 
battle-fields in and around Manila. We saw them depart 
more than a year ago for the seat of war, and have con- 
versed with many of them since their return. We had, 
from the accounts sent out as to the deadly character of 
the swampy land that constituted most of the battle- 
ground, expected to see a lot of pale, wan and emaciated 
creatures whom it were a mercy to bring home again. 
We have not met more than half a dozen men of that kind. 
They are as a regiment blithe and active, and apparently 
equal to any service. They could go and do it all over 
again, and do it better than before. They are now trained 
veterans, who make a much better showing in the line of 
march than when they took their departure. "There is 
nothing the matter with the climate," is their invariable 
reply when interrogated on that subject. But to a man 
they declare that the Philippines are not worth the blood 
and treasure it will cost to conquer and govern them 
The idea appears to be rife among them that Admiral 
Dewey went too far for the United States to fight them 
for their independence, to which they would do no dis- 
credit. It is plain from the men's talk that they did their 
duty because their country had called upon them, but 
that they would not volunteer in a similar service again. 
Many of them would have been willing to settle down in 
the country under Filipino rule, but not whilst two flags 
were fighting for mastery. They say that our California 
boys feel just as they do, and that the same feeling, with 
more or less force, permeates all the volunteer regiments. 

lUf RS. Winslow's Soothing Syrup for half a century has 
J L been regarded as the best friend of little children 
who are teething. Its value is incalculable. It will re- 
lieve the poor little sufferer immediately. It cures diar- 
rhoea, regulates the stomach and bowels, cures wind colic, 
softens the gums, reduces inflammation, and gives tone and 
energy to the whole system. "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 
Syrup" for children teething is pleasant to the taste and 
is the prescription of one of the oldest and best female 
physicians and nurses in the United States, and is for sale 
by all druggists throughout the world. Price, twenty- 
five cents a bottle. 



SOME of the finest water colors ever brought to this 
city have just been received at Kennedy's art store, 
19 and 21 Post street. There are also quite a number of 
excellent oils just in. Kennedy's stock of artists' mater- 
ials is very superior and his prices most reasonable. Pic- 
tures stored and framed. 



STRIP to the top of Mt. Tamalpais, over the pictur- 
esque scenic railway, is one. of the journeys that should 
not be neglected by any tourist. During the recent moon- 
light nights many availed themselves of the trip, which is 
something never to be forgotten. The trains run at con- 
venient hours, so that one may consult bis own pleasure in 
both going and returning. 

No man glories in the fact that he is bald ; take warning in time if 
your scalp itches, it is just a reminder that you will sooner or later 
become bald. Use Smith's Dandruff Pomade, the only positive cure 
for itching scalp. 

There are lotB of "AA" brands of whisky, but only one Jesse Moore *' A A '• 
Do you drink? Then mix Jackson's Napa Soda with your tipple. 



July j.,. 1899. 






r^ c_ 




S0. 



C 



I^musinj; to note the mistakes rua.i. who 

profess to know everything, and yet pi 
lamentably ignorant regarding many topics whir: 
\ contemporary writes in a commiserntin. 
of "those not conversant with early California 
and then goes on to announce that the charminir ' 
Fanny and Josephine Loughborough are gianddaiiL 
of the late General E. D. Keyes. Evidently the writer is 
one of those "not conversant," etc., else he would know 
that the father of these young ladies was the brother of 
General Keyes' second wife: That is all the relationship 
which they bear to the old warrior. 

* • » 

If rumor speaks by the card, there are many married 
men who find Honolulu a most delightful place to have "a 
time" in, and 'tis said the flirting — to put it by no stronger 
term — indulged in by these fellows whom wives at home 
are thinking of as serving their country with zeal, is car- 
ried to an extent bordering on scandalous. 

* # # 

Lake County is having the time of its life; but those who 
make the personnel of the "fleeting show" must not by 
any means flatter themselves that because they are in 
what they consider an out of the way spot, tidings of 
their doiDgs do not reach town. In these days of rapid 
exchange of thought who can hope to be neglected? There 
is one place up there which will merit space for itself be- 
fore long. 

* * # 

San Rafael is not panning out as well as it has in the 
past. The festive paper chase is to be resurrected, but 
the query is, will it be entered into with it sold-time vim? 
The fact that the girls have to depend so largely upon 
married men as partners and players in tennis and golf, 
while possibly equally good fun to the girls themselves, is 
not so gratifying to mammas. 



"By Jove, sir," said an irate old bachelor the other day, 
"by Jove, the women are getting to the front with a ven- 
geance. Just think of a parcel of them marching in a 
procession in uniform, actually, blue coats, brass buttons, 
etc. Now, I move that the dear creatures who want so 
badly to be abreast of the men should have a chance to go 
to the front and fight the Filipinos. Let 'em volunteer, 
sir, and do their duty like the men they wish they were." 

* * * 

What an object lesson was afforded our pretty girls by 
a recent fashionable wedding, when the charming • bride 
(one of the prettiest, most-popular girls in the swim) was 
satisfied to take the man of her choice, albeit he is yet at 
his studies. Several of the bridesmaids would do well to 
ponder on the wisdom of their departing friend and emu- 
late her example. 

* * * 

Rumor used to say that it had once been prophesied for 
Miss Millie Ashe that she should dwell in a royal palace, 
and it looks as though fortune tellers do sometimes strike 
the bull's-eye, for it appears that the Harold Sewalls are 
about to move into the abode lived in by the Princess 
Kapiolani, their lease having expired on the house at Wai- 
kiki, which is to be turned into a seaside hotel. 

* * * 

When men marry and bring their brides out to San 
Francisco, they should, if possible, choose a season of the 
year to introduce the fair dames to our city when the fogs 
and winds have disappeared and the wail over "this hor- 
rid place" would not be heard. 



Baldwin s Dyspepsia Capsules give quiok relief and permanent oure. 
Ferry Drug Store, 8 Market street. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 
Market street, San Francisco. 



Jackson's Napa Soda never tires. 



Cooper & Co.. 746 



I College San Rafael 

For Young Ladies. 



I I I l i l I II H j 



T 

1 



__,. OMKlnctwl by the Slawra ol St. Dominic. * 

Pull collede course or atudle*. A boardlnt ecbool of blf beat * 

grade. Superb modern building, steam be*t«d. Beautiful * 

and eommodlous elate room.. Music aod art noma. * 

Located In tbe lorely Magnolia Valley I 
Cnaurpuaed for beauty and nealthrulneaa. Addrsei. 

* 
MOTHER SUPERIOR. * 

College San Rafael. San Rafael, Oal jjj 

1 m ■ . ' vvMff i iTiiiiiiuiiiiiniiiiniiiim t 



(Founded 1870.1 

3300 Washington St. 

ban Franolaco. 



Trinity School, 

Boarding and Day School for Young Men and Boys 

Prepares for University and College; accredited with tho Univer- 
sity of California and Lelacd Stanford University. A Faculty of 
eleven Professors and Teachers. Boarders limited to thirty Ave. 
Christmas Term opens August 1st 

Ukv. Dr. E. B. Spalding, Rector. 



MILLS COLLEGE AND SEMINARY 

Grants diplomas and cotfers degrees; seminary course accredited to 
the Universities; rare opportunities offered In music, art and elocu- 
tion. Thirty-third year; fall term opens August 2, 1890. Write for 
catalogue to 

MRS C. T. MILLS. Pres , Mills College P. O.. Cal. 



H. J. STEWART, Mus. D. 

Has removed his Music Studio to 

I loo Van Ness Avenue, 
Between Bush and Pine. 

The Solly Walter School of Illustration 

Wll re-open August 1st for the fall and winter term. 
26 O'Farretl St- 

PROF. WALTER WftTSON, &£„«' &W£ElF83Z£ 

Lassons private, in class, or at your resldenoe. 

417 ELLIS STREET, S- F., CAL. 

SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION, DELSARTE, AND VOICE CULTURE. 

Acting and Stage Technique. Course of 75 lessons, $50. 
Zob Rice, 419 McAllister street, Department 3, San Francisco. 

SCIENTIFIC DRESS-CUTTING SIMPLIFIED. 

Just out; something new; wonderful tailor system of Paris, France; the 
most simple, accurate, and rapid system in the world for cutting Ladies', 
Children's, and Gent's Garments. First ten pupils half price. 

Mme. Coon, 504 Eddy street, S. F. 



p^^Ap^^AAAAAAA^/'^^AAAAAAAp^^AA-'V^AA^^^^ 

BEAMISH 

HAS REMOVED to 
209 Montgomery St. 

Dirsctly Opposite Entrance Mills Building. 
Established 30 Years. 
>pww*>p>pv>rwsrwvpvvvv» A >>r>pv>A>vvp>>\**e^rx^»^pvw 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1899. 




We obey no wana but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 



1 CANNOT clearly see why Charles Klein and J. I. C. 
Clarke characterized their play, Heartsease, as a com- 
edy. Whatever extraneous action the melo-dramatic 
form invites, this play presented by Henry Miller and his 
company is not a comedy. It is a drama. Joy and sor- 
row are in the balance; human happiness is at stake; 
sentiment is convulsed; angels and demons are at play; 
love, jealousy, hatred, the passions are wrought up to the 
highest pitch; but vice is defeated, and love fructified by 
the sunshine of smiles and showers of tears continues its 
play in the cycling years. This is the poetry of life, a 
drama, staged 'twixt the laugh of comedy and the sigh of 
tragedy, a mixture of Heartsease and Heartsache, and 
happy if it ends with heartsease for some. 

The plot of the play is the old form, which may be said 
to be the poetry of simplicity. In its composition it seems 
to harmonize with the mathematical precision with which 
Henry Miller loves to move the figures on the chess board, 
otherwise known as the stage. The first position, then, 
is, two men love one girl. Second position, two women 
love one man. Here you behold complications which have 
shaken society ever since Hagar had a joint interest with 
Sarah in the affections of Father Abraham. The posi- 
tions of the various figures on the board are clearly de- 
fined. Each man has his vassalage. One has money and 
station, the other has genius. One puts at the feet of the 
girl a barony with £10,000 a year, the other the wealth of 
his mind, the child of his brain — an unpublished, unsung 
opera. With the natural inconsistency of her sex, the 
girl chooses the latter. Driven by jealousy, the other 
man, seeking to crush his rival, steals his only means of 
advance — the MS. of the opera. Here the second position 
on the board makes its move. When a man is loved by 
two women, it is best for him to be a fatalist and let the 
wind of fortune blow him whither it may. Provided, of 
course, he be conscious of his double misfortune; other- 
wise one of t'nem is sure to ruin him by her kindness. 
That is exactly what happened to Eric Temple, the 
young genius, who is wedded to music; who writes an 
opera and who loves the honorable Miss Neville. But Miss 
Neville has a proud old father, who in his turn has a 
young and pretty wife, who in her turn loves the youog 
genius, and, unknown to him, pays his debts, which com- 
promises her with her husband and the young genius with 
Miss Neville. Now comes the poetry of the plot. Miss 
Neville believes the young genius loves her step-mother, 
and that he had permitted her to pay his debts, which 
makes mince-meat out of the young lady's love. She calls 
him all the names a respectable young woman can spit out 
without blushing, and the young genius goes away covered 
with confusion. The "other man," who is also a "bit of a 
musician," takes the opportunity by the neck and chokes 
it into attesting that the young lady need not mourn her 
lost genius, that Sir Geoffrey's genius is ten thousand 
times, any year, better than the other man's. Sir Geoffrey 
produces the stolen opera under another name. The 
rightful owner returns just in time to hear his work sung 
at the theatre, vice is confounded, virtue triumphs, and 
all ends happily for those who deserve it. 

This is certainly a simple plot. But the execution is 
very little short from being of sublime perfection. In the 
hands of people other than the Miller Company, I have 
serious doubts whether Heartsease would produce the same 
effect. The melodramatic might come to the surface in a 
very cheap form indeed. Only a man of Henry Miller's 
keen sense of the artistic could make the end of the sec- 
ond act, when he takes the hand of his sister to leave the 



house where he had suffered a heart-breaking insult, 
sublime with the power of silence and unspoken agony. 
Only an accomplished artiste like Margaret Dale could 
have given her sympathy to her brother, without pro- 
ducing vulgar shrieks of applause. Only a woman like 
Margaret Anglin could produce the effect of seeming to 
act rightly when she was palpably wrong. As Miss 
Neville her character was like a mimosa, closed and re- 
served when clouds of sorrow passed over the horizon of 
her love; smilingly yielding in the sunshine of true affec- 
tion. Her command to her lover to fight the thief and 
traducer, Sir Geoffrey, when but a moment before she 
had insisted that he should not fight, was positively thrill- 
ing; it was powerful; it was true. Mrs. Thorndyke- 
Boucicault played Lady Neville with perfect grace. Her 
discovery that the musician, Eric Temple, loves, not her, 
but Miss Neville, was a tremendous shock ; but it was done 
so artistically, so naturally, and with such perfect compo- 
sure that the audience had no thought to applaud. And 
yet there is nothing more difficult than just such bits of 
acting. For few people can escape from- the peculiarities 
of their character, and it requires great art to conceal 
tendencies. 

The most difficult part in the play fell to Mr. Guy Stand- 
ing. The more I see of that man's work the more con- 
vinced I grow that he has a great future before him. For 
Guy Standing's nature is as unlike that of Sir Geoffrey's 
as day is from night. But perhaps because of that Stand- 
ing played it so very well. When an actor is forced to be 
on the stage for some time alone, and when, in addition, 
he has not very much to say, he is in danger of hearing 
some calls from the gallery. But Standing's presence on 
the stage was readily understood by the audience. He 
was developing the real plot of the play, the theft of the 
MS. of Eric Temple's opera. Nor did he quite steal it. 
He manipulated the theft by sending it to a place where 
the composer would not look for it, and whence he could 
take it at will. His appearance during the performance 
of the opera which be had filched, his manner, his speech — 
all was perfect. 

Poor James Lindsay was suffering from a severely in- 
jured finger, but did the drunken Major Twombley capi- 
tally well. Earl Brown was more than good as Captain 
Jack O'Hara, the faithful friend of Eric Temple, and made 
a most ingenuous lover. Particularly good was Leslie 
Allen as Peter Padbury, the money lender, who drops his 
Hs and is very eager to come into contact with the nobil- 
ity, though it be by means of His Lordship's foot against 
the extended back of the Padbury person. 

During the performance some fine singing is done behind 
the scenes. Miss Millie Flynn, Frank Coffin, and Homer 
Henley did the work beautifully. All of which goes to show 
that Henry Miller's success is not based upon the chance 
pleasure of the public but that it is due to a tremendous 
lot of hard work. The audience feels that brains were at 
work to present things artistic in the most complete form 
before them. Wherefore it happened that Henry Miller 
received their full meed of appreciation by ten curtain 
calls on the opening night. It will be a long time before 
San Francisco theatre-goers and art lovers will grow tired 
of Henry Miller and his company. 
# *' * 

Madame Hans Gene at the California is, of course, a very 
fine play. The French, and of late particularly Sardou, 
excel in the matter of finesse. The Frawleys, too, gave an 
excellent presentation. Miss Bates more than rose to 
the occasion. As the laundress she was fine, but infinitely 
finer was she as the Duchess. The latter was a very 
difficult role, but Miss Bates did the work with charming 
naturalness. Her emotion when Lefebvre spoke to ber of 
divorce was a splendid bit of acting. Blanche Bates will 
make an excellent Jewish character in The Children of 
the Ghetto. She has the personal force to reserve great 
passion for the proper moment. Whether Augustus 
Conk speaks like Napoleon is not so very material. It is 
sufficient that he presents him and his characteristics in 
the best form I have so far seen. We really see the 
"Little Corsican." What a pity we cannot have the crisp 
and resonant sounds of Napoleon's speech. I am not 
given to worship the grandly heroic in women. I prefer 
the gentle feminine, and would have my goddess consider- 



July » 9 , 1899. 






»bly under six feet, even in her d»in> . 
reason I don't quit? incline towards Miss Van 
I have observed that she was too grandly hor. 
part she has thus far played. In thi 
topped Augustus Cook by something like a head and a 
half. In T she showed us a neck 

and back (and front) which, though rather go< 
at, were too massive, too gigantic for my taste. That she 
is a splendid "personality'' on the stage is undeniable, 
that she can also talk and act has as yet not bee 
vealed to me. Distinctively good was Mr. King as Y 
He insinuated himself into the good grace of the an. 
by bis play with Madame Sans Gene, which seemed to me 
to be far and above the work of all the other actors. II:. 
was keen, calm and dignified acting. As when he coached 
the "Duchess" at the reception to thesistersof Napoleon, 
or when he arranged to free the Austrian Embassador De 
Neipperg, whom Napoleon had condemned to death. In 
fact, during the entire play he divided the honors with 
Miss Bates. Alfred Eickman gave his part an ideality 
which was quite in harmony with the spirit of the times. 
Altogether the play was well staged and well presented, 
and, what is probably of greater importance, well at- 
tended. Adolphe Danzigbb. 



Grand opera in Italian, German and French at popular 
prices is bound to attract crowded houses to the Tivoli 
Opera House during the next two months, and the season 
which opens on Monday evening with a great cast in the 
opera Aifln, has every indication of being the most brilliant 
ever given in this city. Some of the most famous lyric 
singers of Europe have been brought here to sing for the 
first time to an American audience, while others reappear 
to renew former triumphs. Among others, Fraulein Ella 
Prosnitz, Mary Linck, Miss Anna Lichter, Baron Berthald 
from the King's Theatre in Berlin, William Mertens, 
Signor Ferdinand Foneari, and Signor Avedano. Aida 
will be sung Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 
evenings, and Lucia will be produced Tuesday, Thursday, 
Sunday evenings and Saturday matinee. Many operas 
new to this city will be sung during the season. 

The Grand Opera House has been packed during the 
week, and Faust, in English, has been presented in a most 
complete and delightful manner. Monday evening we are 
to have a superlative production of the funniest of all 
funny operas, Boccaccio, which will be mounted with gor- 
geous scenery and beautiful Florentine costumes of the 
15th century. The cast will include the entire company 
and several new and important engagements. 

On Monday evening the Frawley Company will Jpresent 
Bronson Howard's comedy-drama, One Of Our Girls, at 
the California Theatre. Blanche Bates will take the 
title-role, Frawley will take the part of that excellent, 
though stolid English gentleman, Captain John Gregory, 
of the Fifth Lancers; Harrington Reynolds will imperson- 
ate Dr. Girodet, Alfred Hickman will be the French 
noble, and the character of the vivacious little French 
girl will be played by debonair Hope Ross. 

Heartsease, by special request, will be continued at the 
Columbia Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday night, with mati- 
nee Wednesday afternoon. On Monday night a fine auto- 
graph souvenir of Mr. Miller will be given every lady in 
the theatre. Thursday night Hamlet, with Miller in the 
title role. 

To-morrow night, after a week's excellent business, 
Faust will be withdrawn from the Alcazar; and the roman- 
tic play, Romeo and Juliet, will be presented, with Miss 
Roberts and Whittlesey in the leading characters. The 
management will s*age tkis great play in a correct and 
lavish manner, and the costumes will be superior. The 
public will enjoy a great treat in this excellent production. 

The bill at the Orpheum for next week promises to be 
exceptionally strong. Of the new attractions the great- 
est is probably Cotton and Long, two well-known San 
Franciscans, who have become famous in the theatrical 
world since leaving the city. Idalene Cotton, while here, 
will give imitations of famous actresse s, including Mrs. 

For Sale. — House of twelve rooms; newly furnished; central. 
Rooms all occupied. Owner sick. (Terms easy). 595 Ellis St., S. F. 

End up your spree and taper off and sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



7 



aoMh 

will do some UrI I 

w »ll 111 Lands 

of an artist. There are but few hold <- 

J«*t \?r Zinkand miv pveumg and *njoy th* tmp+rb 

ir, cUmIc and rag time ; alto I which 

the patron-* of thai line cafe an 

Momma he sure and use •' lira. Wloalow'i Sooth toe Syrup" (or rovr 
ihiMton while urthiPB. 



IVOll Upera fiOUSe- Proprietor and Manager. 

Last times of WANG— to night and to-morrow evening Fare- 
well appearances of tdwin Stevens at the Tivoll. 
Next Monday evening. Opening of the Grand Opera Season 
Id \ordls masterpiece, 

A I f^ d Monday, Wednesday. Friday, and Saturday evenings. 
I Un. With the most famous cast ever beard In tbla city. 

a>iw . . Praaleia Ella Prosnlli 

The peerless dramatic soprano from J, a Beala, Milan. 
AMRBBM Mi- Marv Linck. 

Reappearance of the great contralto. 

RaDAME* Signor Ferdinand Avedano 

Italy's famous dramatic tenor. 

Amonasko . Signor Guidenzo Salassa 

The unrivaled baritone from La Scala. 
Ramfhm . Signor G.8 Waurell. 

The greatest of bassus. 

Karo OF Egypt ... Herr William Schuster. 

The favorite basso cantante. 

MESSENGER Signor Vincenzo Fonoari. 

From the Royal Opera House Genoa. 
Powerful orchestra and chorus. MagolBient stage settings and 
costumes. 

Popular Prices: 25c. and 50c. Our telephone. Bush 9. 

I I JO I A With another great cast. Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday 
uUvln evening an d Saturday matinee. 

ahtornia I heatre. Manager. 

Never before in the history of Mr. Frawley's entree into the 
Dramatic Field of this city, has bis organization met with sue!) 
Mattering reception, as on ibis occasion House packed at 
every performance Curtain calls nightly. Delighted audi 
ennes. Perfect productions. Commencing with Monday even- 
ing, July 3lst, Miss Blanche Bates and her superb cumpany 
will present Bronson Howard's greatest comedy drama 

ONE OF OUR GIRLS 

Newscenerv; new costumes; new stage effects, for every play 

Reserved seats, 25c, 50c, 7oc, and $1. Matinee prices: 25c, 

50c, ?5o 

CI l' TL J. Gottlob, Marx & Co.. 

Ol UmDia I neaure, Lessees and Managers. 

Next Monday night— Souvenir event. 50tb performance of the 

HENRY MILLER 

Season. Continued success: Last times. Monday, 1 uesdav 
iind Wi.'dn sday evenings, and special matinee Wednesday. 
HEARTSEASE. Important Event: Thursday. Friday and 
Saturday evenings and Saturday matinee, Charles Frohman 
presents his second great Shakespearean revival, HAMLET 
Henry Miller In the title role. 
August 7th: BRutbek OifFlcEHS. 

Gj /"\ LJ Morosco Amusement Co., Inc. 

rand Upera (lOUSe. Lessees. Telephone, Mala 532 

Last performances of FAUST- 

Next Monday, July 31, 1899. Grand production of 

BOGGAGGIO. 

Our prices— Orchestra floor, 35 and 50c. ; Dress Circle, reserved. 
2nc; Family Circle, reserved, 15c; U»Jlery, 10c Matinee 
Saturday. Best reserved seat in the house, 25c 
Branch ticket offloa just inside main entrance or Emporium. 

n I TL -L Fred Belasco, Lessee. Mark Thall, 

/"AlCaZar I neatre. Manager. 'Phone Main a>4, 

Week of July 31st. Elaborate scenic production of Shakes- 
peare's greatest play delineating the power of loee. 

ROMEO, AND clULIET. 

Florence Roberts as Juliet. White Whittlesey as Romeo. 

Supported by the pick of the Alcazar company. 

i -ur prices: l5o. 25c. 35c. 60c. 

In preparation : "The Lady of Lyons " 

Ol San Franolsco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell St. 

rpnSUm. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Sunday matinee, July 30th. 

IDALENE GOTTON AND NIGK LONG, 

Jopeph Adelman. Dave Meier. Herr G Von Palm, Laura Joyoe 
Belt & Co , La Fafalla, Elizabeth Murray, Phoites Pantomime, 
theEldrldges. 
'Reserved seats 25o: baloonylOo; opera chairs and box seats 
sue. Matinees Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 29, 1899. 



THE TRAGIG SEQUEL OF 

A SPIRIT'S VJISIT. 



By Emma Norton. 



IN a few hours strangers will come into this house, and 
they will be horror stricken; for on his bed downstairs 
they will find the material part of Captain Hicks. He was 
my husband. Up stairs in this room where I now sit 
writing the statement which will give to the world the 
history of the Hicks murder and suicide, will be found my 
dead body. 

It is a cold bleak morning, though the middle of June; 
and a dense fog bides the eternal ocean from my sight as 
I sit for the last time before the desk in the window where 
I have sat for many weary hours during the last five years. 
When Captain Hicks brought me to this prison he built 
for me on the forbidding iron bound coast of Marin County, 
be said, "You will always have it before you, always it's 
accusing voice ringing in your ears." It is calling to me 
now, from under it's thick blanket of fog; alternately 
threatening, moaning, lamenting. 

I was born in New York. Orphaned early in life, I 
lived with an aunt who, although she did her duty to me, 
and gave me a good education, cared little for me. When 
barely twenty years of age, I became acquainted with 
Captain Hicks; a well appearing man of the blond type, 
Captain, and part owner of the large well appointed sail- 
ing ship, the Sea Queen. "My ship is Queen of the Sea," 
he said, "and you shall be my Queen and hers." I did not 
love, but I respected him greatly, and, delighted with the 
idea of sailing over the world, married him gladly. For 
a time the novelty of life on shipboard, and the pleasure I 
derived from visiting foreign countries, charmed me. But 
I grew very tired of it all, and my husband, though a good 
man, and as far above me as the stars, as the sequel will 
prove, was self contained, and undemonstrative; and the 
monotony of sea life grew intolerable to me. Too listless 
to read or sew, I would sit for hours in my lounging chair 
on the deck gazing at the interminable waters, longing, 
forever longing, for some intangible something. 

Near the close of the second year of our marriage, we 
were in the port of San Francisco nearly ready for sea. I 
had gained a reluctant consent from my husband to re- 
main in the city with friends for that voyage, and on the 
morning of the day on which the Sea Queen was to sail, I 
went on board to bid good-bye for a year as I thought to 
my floating home. As I prepared to leave the cabin which 
had been fitted up for me as a bride with every comfort, 
and many luxuries, my husband said, "It will be very 
lonely here without you Irene, in the long days and nights 
to come, but I will not be selfish; enjoy yourself on shore, 
and I shall be consoled in thinking you are happy, and in 
anticipation of the welcome you will give me when I re- 
turn." Who can account for the emotions? I who had 
been overjoyed at the prospect of freedom on the green 
earth, now felt an equally strong desire to remain on the 
Sea Queen with my husband, i went close to him; his 
steel blue eyes were moist. He opened his arms; I sprang 
into them, and for one brief moment they enfolded me, and 
his lips — rare occurrence — were pressed to mine. 

Releasing me he said in steady tones, "It is time for you 
to go ashore Irene." 

"Send for my trunks," I replied, "I am going with you." 
He gave the order instantly; and, as though fearing I 
would change my mind, he would not listen to my going on 
land again to superintend the packing of my things. O, 
irony of fate! What seemed a yielding to a wifely im- 
pulse, proved to be the ship-wreck of our lives. 

The weather was stormy for the first few days, and I 
kept my cabin. My husband had told me that his first 
mate had been taken ill a short time prior to our sailing, 
and he had been obliged to take a substitute; a man who 
had been highly recommended. I paid little attention to 
the matter, it not concerning me, as I then thought, in 
the least. On the first fair morning I went on deck, sat 
idly looking at the water, my book unopened in my lap, 
already regretting the land, and envying the freedom of 
the sea birds that circled around the ship. A sudden im- 
pulse made me turn my head. Leaning against the door 



of the forward cabin, was a man I had never seen before. 
The new first mate of the Sea Queen — it could be none 
other. His hat was well down over bis eyes, and I felt 
that they were intently fixed upon myself. I seemed 
powerless to turn my face away. How long the spell 
would have lasted I do Dot know, had not Captain Hicks 
appeared. He beckoned the mate to come forward, and 
very formally presented him to me. He as formally 
acknowledged the introduction and walked away. 

That afternoon I lay in my berth trying to sleep. Im- 
possible. The image of the new mate of the Sea Queen 
haunted me. I gave up trying to sleep, and looked at my 
reflection in the large mirror at the foot of my berth. A 
hebe-like form of a woman in a robe of pale blue negligee, 
hands clasped over her head, her white arms forming a 
pillow for a head of red golden hair; a face rather pale, 
scarlet lips, and restless grey eyes. Not good eyes, not 
eyes to trust. But I was young, innocent of wrong doing, 
and my thoughts were not of evil. I knew vaguely that 
my life was changed, and that I would no longer be dull 
on the Sea Queen. 

I used to sit in my chair, and watch the handsome first 
mate glide over the decks like a panther. He was cruel 
too, like a panther. Once I saw him strike a sailor for a 
trifling offence. In another, the act would have disgusted 
me; but the sudden spring of his graceful sinuous body, 
the quick firm blow such as a panther gives with his velvet 
paw fascinated me. 

My husband in his cold calm way was kindness itself to 
me, but 1 never did, and never could love him. I was 
twenty-two, and possessed of an exuberant animal beauty, 
that arouses the worst in many men. 

Herman Stetson was the opposite of my husband in 
everyway, and as handsome in his dark beauty, as any 
fiend sent as an emissary by the prince of Hades, to lure 
women to their doom: and I loved him passionately; and by 
love's telegraphy I knew his love equaled my own. 

The months rolled on. We were sailing in southern 
sea3. The fiery sun beat down upon us from early dawn, 
till it was engulfed in the sudden tropic night. Dinner 
had been served; Captain Hicks was suffering with a 
headache. I administered some medicine and prepared to 
sit by his couch. "No dear," he said kindly, "go on deck 
and enjoy the cool of the evening; I shall try and sleep." 
My heart gave a guilty throb; it was the first mate's 
watch on deck. How vividly every incident of that night 
comes back to me. The gown I wore, of thin black 
material shot with crimson, and the black lace scarf I 
wound around my head and shoulders, is the same I have 
on now. As the sun sank beneath the ocean line, and I 
watched the fiery train it left behind it on sky and water, 
I knew, someway that my sun had set too; but unlike that 
other sun, it would not arise with the dawn. Soon Herman 
Stetson came to me; we spoke with calmness of the beauty 
of the night. It was a forced calmness, for each had read 
the secret of the other; we knew we were two beings 
whose every throb and breath of life was a mad desire to 
rush into each other's arms. 

I went to the side of the ship and laid my hand on the 
rail to steady myself, for I was trembling with repressed 
emotion. The mellow tropic moon enveloped us in a 
dreamy haze; the glittering southern cross looked down 
upon us; the wind that filled our sails was laden with the 
cerfume of the spice islands we were nearing; the Sea 
Queen was cutting her way through luminous phosphor- 
escent waters. We were on a secluded part of the deck 
screened even from the sight of the man at the wheel, and 
the glamour of a night full of alluring destructive witchery 
was upon us. Herman Stetson let his hand fall heavily 
over mine. 

"What use to struggle longer with fate?" he whispered, 
in a trembling voice. His touch had broken the spell. 

"How dare you " I began, but the words ended in a 

sob. "It is useless Irene, you love me as only women like 
you can love, and I would sacrifice my soul for you; you 
have no right to live with your husband under these con- 
ditions. Trust to me; and on one of these fair southern 
islands you and I will live in an earthly Paradise. Think 
of it my love, you and I together forever." 

The eloquent silence of months was broken, and with it 
the spell that had bound me. I saw the folly and wicked- 



July 2 9 , 1899. 



1 m:\vs letticr. 



ncss of it all, but I loved him still. His breath was on my 
cheek; his great black eves were burning into mv of 
grew reckless. >u madly With one 

of hi-* quick movements he clasped me in his arms and his 
lips found mine. For one mad moment I yielded to my 
first kiss of love. As I freed myself from bis ai 
" I have tasted for the tirst and last time of ths ft 
Paradise, its flavor will never leave my lips: think of me 
what you will, I have made my shameful confession. I 
love you! And I hate myself that it is so! I am going to 
my husband. Never again dare to speak to me of what 
has passed, acd leave the employ of Captain Hicks as soon 

as possible, or What more I had intended to say was 

frozen on my lips, for my husband sprang past me mutter- 
ing a curse. With his panther-like spring Herman Stet- 
son met him and hurled him to the deck. What the ending 
had been but for the interposition of a higher power, it is 
impossible to conjecture. Captain Hicks regained his 
feet almost instantly, but the mate fell prone on the deck. 
No one of the ship's crew had seen the incident; no one but 
my husband and myself knew what had precipitated the 
heart disease that made the first mate of the Sea Queen 
fall dead on bis watch. 

I have lived in a kind of a dream since that time, till I 
was aroused by the terrible events of last night. It was 
characteristic of Captain Hicks that he said very little to 
me of the havoc I had made of our lives. I was content to 
let him order our future as he thought proper. He sold 
his interest in the Sea Queen, built this house in the lonely 
place I have described, invested the money so as to bring 
us in a modest income, and here we have lived isolated 
from the world for five years; keeping no help, performing 
all domestic duties ourselves. We have been regarded by 
our few neighbors as people with a mystery. I have un- 
veiled it. 

Yesterday, when the newspapers were brought to us 
from San Francisco, my attention was attracted to an ar- 
ticle on spiritualism. An eminent divine had declared that 
spirits could and did return to earth. But, he said, they 
were evil spirits; the good did not return. What I read 
impressed me greatly. I had never through all the shad- 
owy years forgotten my love for Herman Stetson. If he 
was a spirit he was an evil one. I, too, would be an evil 
spirit when I passed away. Could I by the force of my 
breathing love, and his in the spirit, bring him to me? 
I would try. His mortal remains lay under' fathoms of 
water thousands of miles away; but his spirit would know 
no obstacle of distance. All that day my mind was intent 
upon the trial I had determined to make when darkness 
fell. 

Night at last. 

My sluggish brain grew abnormally active. My hus- 
band, as was his custom, retired early to his room down- 
stairs. I was free at last to tempt a supernatural phe- 
nomena. The fire and activity ot my nature, so long dor- 
mant, had returned to me. I took from a long-unopened 
trunk the dress and scarf I had worn that tragic night on 
board the Sea Queen, and arranged my hair as it had been 
then. As I stood before the mirror I saw with joy that 
the ecstacy of my expectations had brightened the beauty 
that the last five dreary years had dimmed. When I was 
dressed I raised the curtains to their fullest extent, extin- 
guished the lamp, and went to the window. It was moon- 
light as on that other night, and I could see for miles 
over the ocean. It was singing a dirge. I concentrated 
my brain until it seemed it must break with the tension, 
on the events of that night, and on Herman Stetson — im- 
ploring, beseeching him to come to me. I was growing 
dizzy with the strain on my nerves, when suddenly an odor 
of brine and of spice floated into the room. I felt no fear, 
only great exaltation, for I knew that my will had pre- 
vailed and that his spirit had come at my call. I turned 
from the window; in the center of the room with a faint 
bluish mist around him, my lover stood looking at me. His 
eyes glowed with the passionate love of that tropic night 
which had been so fateful on the deck of the Sea Queen; 
but there was an expression of evil in them I had not seen 
before. His lips moved, but no sound came from them. I 

When your head aohes just read; to burst, that's where Jaolison's Napa 
Soda comes in. 



understood his framed words as though I had boon reading 
fmm a book. 

waited for ■ lor my in shall 

r separate v.mrself from him you ha 
band. He will be with good spirits, yon will 1 
the hereafter, and his path and ours will never cross, 
cannot choose but obey me, for I have all power over you 
now that you have called me." 

He beckoned me to follow him; he conducted me down 
stairs into the room where mv husband lay upon his bed in 
a heavy sleep. The terrible spirit looked at the sleeping 
form a minute, then motioned to a cane of polished wood — 
a cunningly-devised murderous thing we had brought from 
over the sea as a curio. I understood; I took it from its 
restiog place, touched the discreet spring that freed the 
cruel knife, and compelled by the influence of the demon 
I had called, I struck the man whose evil fate I bad been. 
Then something snapped in my brain and I fell. 

When I came to myself it was morning. The horrors of 
the night were vividly impressed on my mind; but had it 
not all been a fevered dream? Ah, no! The cane knife 
was beside me on the floor, and the form on the bed was 
motionless. He looked peaceful, and the subtile blade 
leaves no blood trace, as you, whoever you may be, will 
find when you draw it from my heart. 




Semmgtpn 



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IO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1899. 



"HAST THOU KILLED, AND ALSO TAKEN POSSESSION?" 

EDITOR News Letter— Sir: Tbe Hon. George F. Ed- 
monds, ex-U. S. Senator from Vermont, and one of 
the most esteemed and eminent of living Republicans, re- 
cently said: "As we are stronger than most nations, we 
ought, if we really believe in the great truths on which 
our Government is founded, to be scrupulous in the high- 
est degree in our conduct toward every people with whom 
we have to do. Whether we have been so is a question it 
is the bounden duty of every citizen to consider, and if he 
thinks the officers the people have elected are mistaken 
in their policy, or wrong in their conduct of affairs, he 
ought to say so, and do his best to correct the wrong and 
change or modify the policy. This is the very essence of 
the political duty of a citizen." 

The Constitution of the United States declares: "Con- 
gress shall make no law respecting an establishment of 
. religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or 
abridging the freedom of speech or of the press; or the 
right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition 
the Government for a redress of grievances." 

Last week, under the head of "Forcible Annexation," 
"Criminal Aggression," "Benevolent Assimilation," I 
submitted through the columns of your paper, for the con- 
sideration of the general public, certain official documents. 
Upon the exposition of facts therein contained, which can 
be verified by the Government official records, whence 
they are chiefly drawn, our war upon the Filipinos will be 
judged by the enlightened conscience of all lovers of truth 
and liberty throughout the world. 

I now submit the noble utterances of Mr. Charles M. 
Sturges, in his address at Chicago July 4, 1899, published 
under the appropriate and significant heading, "Hast 
Thou Killed, and Also Taken Possession ? " and especially 
commend them to Aspirants to Office, Clerical Expansion- 
ists, Superserviceable Postmasters, and Such, to read, 
ponder, and inwardly digest: 

"In the yet dark morning of its deliverance from a gall- 
ing bondage, one of Liberty's newest born looked from 
its islands for pledges and succor to the chosen continent 
of freedom, belted across and flashing from nearer to 
farther ocean with all her signal fires to the down-trodden 
and oppressed. To the doors of our capitol were borne 
the urgent petitions of that little one. With doubtful 
rhetoric, nor well at ease in the English tongue — old and 
unconquerable ally of liberty! — those utterances if brokenly, 
yet mightily, pleaded to conscience and our past. They 
might almost have stirred in its slumbers the neighboring 
dust of Washington — almost have moved aright in its 
scabbard his ancient sword. We replied with contumely. 
Our councilors scorned and our press jeered. We an- 
swered with new hastening squadrons, for intimidation or 
slaughter. 

If it were to be so, well hide those petitions, without 
sign, in the most secret strong-place of your capitol; and, 
if you may, set its time-lock for release after the day of 
judgment, that at its tremendous Sittings, when before 
Him shall be gathered all nations, they escape not to tes- 
tify against you: "Ye did it not to one of the least of 
these: " 

Our chief men at war had looked upon the little outly- 
ing vineyard, and it was fair to see "for a garden of 
herbs." Our religion had plausibly declaimed: " I will 
give thee for it a better vineyard." The queenly North- 
west, recreant to that ancient Ordinance whereof she was 
born and greatly dowered, had whispered to her lord: 
"Dost thou now govern the kingdom ? " Thereupon, with 
blood, we demanded the inheritance of their fathers. 

" Thus saith the Lord, Hast Thou Killed, and Also 
Taken Possession?" 

Proudly bearing the Declaration of our Independence 
and all our other holy scriptures of liberty, under the 
shadowing glow of our uplifted flag, and in the presence 
of God, angels and men, and of the departed spirits of our 
fathers, we announce to a people hungering and by our 
examples in revolt for freedom: 

"You, and your country, are ours — bought in at a 
price on war execution against your last master. These 
priceless teachings of liberty are too rich a cordial to 
agree with your constitution, or with our comfortable 



ownership. We will see that you partake of its great 
elixir in safe and frugal doses — out of our lesser United 
States spoon, long stained and odorous with like adminis- 
trations to our native subject races. Our representative 
Congress, which never saw you and knows neither your 
customs nor your speech, shall declare your fundamental 
laws in a foreign tongue, and write levies on your sub- 
stance and earnings, and how they shall be expended. Its 
wise men maintain that, in the nature of things, your citi- 
zens cannot sustain to it those relations upon which de- 
pend even the humble remedy of the constituent by peti- 
tion. An elective president — for whom in no one of your 
thousand islands was ever ballot cast by one of their ten 
millions of inhabitants — shall equip your tribunals and ap- 
point your overseers and taskmasters. It is said that 
even now, with his advisers, he busies himself in pulling 
down irksome safeguards to purity in administration. At 
the end of each four years you shall have the privilege to 
compute new incoming with departing hordes. 

" These gospels of independence are for the masters; for 
Anglo-Saxon blood; for white skins; for intrepid hearts 
willing, even with their women and little ones, highly to 
testify to them unyielding devotion with their blood. They 
are not for you." 

Is this the residuum and deposit of an hundred and 
twenty-four Fourths of July, and was all the rest froth 
and fraud ? 

Having devised a bacterial and microbic liberty to be 
progressively inoculated with attenuated virus, our engi- 
neers and artificers further construct complacent prom- 
ises for humanity and good behavior — with performance 
and maturity at the option of the maker. With such bills 
of exchange in our newly expanded Asiatic commerce, we 
seek to barter for men and independence. " Our priceless 
principles undergo no change under a tropical sun. They 
follow the flag." Have we laden them, with shot, shell 
and powder, into our transports for alternative consump- 
tion by a people kindled for freedom by our home teach- 
ings ? Ask the brown villager, sitting by the ashes of his 
cabin, beholding his desolated industries and the smoulder- 
ing walls of his bumble place of worship, rudely comfort- 
ing his mangled living — whose "dim eyes to Liberty he 
turns " — and mourning for his dead; — ask him for faith in 
those principles which, convoyed by that flag, "running 
across the sea changed naught but sky," and remained 
capable of those things I 

The debate is idle as to who struck the first blow. We 
assaulted when, signing and sealing the great feoffment, 
with livery of seizin to us of ten millions of people, to 
have and to hold their birth-places, their homes and their 
future, we scrupled to write one little word of independ- 
ence on all the mighty scroll. Each Gatling gun hurried 
to the Philippines after war with Spain was ended, 
"though silent, already belched forth " all the slaughter 
it has since accomplished. Then standing in their homes, 
with arms in our hands, each ominous muteness as to our 
intentions was an uplifted blow. 

Equally idle is the assertion that we have gone too far 
to stop — Satan's own maxim to his acolytes. " Let him 
that stole, steal no more." No nation was yet lost in a 
straight road. Having eaten in those islands a bloody 
lotos, in whose delirium and dreadful stupor we forget our 
country and the God of our forefathers, shall we no more 
awaken, nor "smite hoary Ocean with our oars in sorrow- 
ing return ? " 

Not fit to be free I It was always the plea of tyrants. 
No brutal heel but trampled down springing liberties with 
that utterance; no slave but toiled and wept at its bid- 
ding; no plantation lash but fell to its cadence. It was 
the sailing directions for the slave-ship, and the chart to 
the Middle Passage. 

A horticultural liberty — selected, clipped, potted, and 
dealt in to order, over the counter, by shopmen with an 
eye to profit 1 It is a spurious plant I Her tree does not 
so grow. Its seed imperishably awaits, from the beginning 
soil and opportunity. When these have called, it answers 
"lam." That it has sprung up is its voucher of legiti- 
macy. 

Independence is born of its own mighty travail, "with 
groanings that cannot be uttered." Its texts are: "With 
a great sum obtained I thisfreedom," and "These be they 



July 39, 1899. 



SAN FRANCISCO RSW8 LETTER 



which came up out of great tribulation.'' It grows by iU 
own responsibilities and its own endeavors. It 
e»er sing: "Who would be free, themselves mil 
blow." It is greatly nourished even by its o«: 
and excesses, and thereupon by its own bitter 
atoning blood. Though its form be at first crude and mis- 
shapen, by such struggles it stands mightily at la-t in ful- 
filled sovereignty. 

" Now hair appoarr.l 

The tawny lion, pawing to get tree 

His himler part;*, then springs as broke from hon>l«. 

And rampant shake* hi? brinded mane." 

Liberty will never endure that her children shall be half 
slave and half free. August and incorruptible, she stoops 
to no morganatic alliance in which they shall not take the 
full rank of every drop of their superior and descended 
blood. She counts her offsprings highly born even in man- 
gers and rude places of the earth — "among beasts and 
base straw." She will not that anyone of them shall have 
a keeper. 

Quu autodiei ipio» cuslodes ? Who, indeed, shall keep the 
keepers, and shackle the master? 

God made no man fit to be the autocrat and keeper of 
his fellow man. In His whole universe was found no clay 
which, breathed on even by His own breath and fashioned 
by His own hand, could be so tempered and moulded. 
Creating man in His own image, He exhausted His pro- 
found order and resources when He made him Brother of 
his kindred man. Searched out by omniscience was found 
no worthier or loftier name. In the beginning it was the 
Word. In the progress of time the creator Himself wore 
the badge of its exalted order, and, as very God, on earth 
wrought its craft and spoke its pass-words of "peace" 
and "good will." Again, in the ages, His spirit moved 
upon the face of the waters to a new world, and under new 
skies — toward accomplishment of Its ancient promise of a 
new heaven and a new earth — in aid of that word through 
Its inspired ones breathed the august formula, and new 
revelation and beatitude to mankind, of "government by 
just consent." 

The world will never let that word die. Whether dimly 
worshiped in caves of the earth as an unknown god, or 
through storm and stress in ripening civilization insisting 
on its adjudications, it forever remains humanity's hope 
and consolation until, in the fullness of time, the great 
cycle shall have been run and "Man to man, the world 
o'er, shall Brothers be." 

The rest is slavery. Let high priests, statesmen and 
traders wrap up its great falsehood with whatever tissues 
of holiness, policy, and lucre they may, with every such 
enfoldment it becomes more and more a lie, and heavier to 
be carried. Its religion is of those "whose gospel is 
their maw." Its statecraft is Moloch's. Its profits weight 
destiny like the thirty pieces of Judas. Whether soon or 
late, shuddering at its infections and tremendous repri- 
sals, and with whatever of dreadful amends — bewailing 
our first-born and mourning our wasted hopes and sub- 
stance — we will cast the festering burden down, with all 
its noisome cerements, to swift and abhorred burial; and, 
that the place of its sepulchre might always be blotted 
out, and that its contagions might no third time escape in 
our land, we would, if we could, pour over it an hundred- 
fold the bitter and desolating waters wherewith the Al- 
mighty cleansed and forever hid, the burial place of Sodom. 

Our countrymen are "traitors" who think and speak 
these things? Stand forth, mighty and unnumbered shades 
who under that ban wrought and died for Freedom, "of 
whom the world was not worthy," but whose memories 
have found safe sanctuary in God's eternal years I 

John J. Valentine. 

San Francisco, July 24, 1S99. 



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ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Challenge Cons. Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on. the 18th day of July, 1899, an assessment (No. 27) of Ten Cents (10c) 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately In Unitec States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 35, third floor Mills builalng. San Francisco, Oal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
22d DAY OF AUGUST, 1899, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on TUESDAY, the 12th day of Sep- 
tember, 1899, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale By order of the Board of Direotors. 

C, L. McCOY, beorctary. 
Office— Room 35, third floor, Mills Building, San Francisco. Cal, 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Ophlr Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 75 

Amount per Share 15 cents 

Levied July 6, 1899 

Delinquent in Office August 8, 1899 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock August 28, 1809 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Room 60, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Chollar Mining Company. 

Assessment No. <i'.\ 

Amount per share 15 cents 

Levied July 21, 1899 

Delinquent In offloe August 24, 1899 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 14,1899 

CHARLES E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 
Office — Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery streets, San Fran- 
oisco, Cal. 

Ifllfcl'T CC C as well as 1 should, is a complaint you hear not 
Oriii I Out only from older people but from the young as well. 
Age is no criterion for the wearing of glasses. 
Many are born with greater defects than come with age. Young people 
inherit, and cultivate defects by strain and abuse. Young, old, or middle- 
aged, if you arenot getting the servioe from your eyes that you think you 
should, you ought certainly to ascertain the nature of your trouble I can 
tell you. Examination free. SAN FRANCISCO OPTICAL CO, ?37 
Kearny street, S. F., next Bulletin. A. L. Speace, Ida B. Spence, Expert 
Opticians. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1899. 




I 



Reminiscences. Of the writing of biographies, auto- 
biographies, reminiscences and memoirs 
there seems to be no end, and when they are as felicitous, 
familiar and full of good character sketches as Mr. Justin 
McCarthy's "Reminiscences," which have just appeared 
in two large volumes, they are something to be unspeak- 
ably grateful for. It was the writer's happy fortune to 
meet with a great many distinguished men and women, 
and it is the impressions made upon him during his asso- 
ciation with them that he has reproduced from the table 
of his memory for the benefit of his readers. In Febru- 
ary, 1852, when twenty-one years of age, he saw London 
for the first time: 

Every spot I passed brought to me some association out of a book. 
The old inns on" the south side called back Chaucer to my mind. 
The Temple Gardens were alive with Shakespeare and Addison, and 
Dickens and Thackeray. Eastcheap was a place to linger in and to 
haunt because of the memories of Prince Hal and Falstaff. One can 
never again feel as he felt when he first made holiday in London, 
especially if he were a bookish sort of young man, who had filled 
. his provincial life with associations drawn from English literature. 

Some famous figures, which have long since passed into 
history, were to be seen even then in Hyde Park: 

In the Park and at the Horse Guards people still looked out for 
the Duke of Wellington. I have seen him often in Whitehall or 
Piccadilly, walking vigorously along in his blue coat and white duck 
trousers, or driving in that peculiar cab which he invented to suit 
his own ideas of comfort, ease, speed and grace. Everyone knew 
him as he passed. Another figure familiar to anyone who cared to 
watch the entrance to the House of Lords in Palace Yard, was that 
of Lord Brougham. That, indeed, was a figure which, once seen. 
couid not easily be forgotten. Brougham, I should think, was about 
the worst dressed man who ever entered the House of Lords. I 
used to wonder, as I saw him, where he got his hat made, that 
queer, old, shapeless beaver hat— are there any beaver hats in ex- 
istence now?— with the thick fur apparently all rubbed the wrong 
way. 

Speaking of the hold which the great literary triumvir- 
ate of that time — Dickens, Thackeray and Tennyson, had 
on the public mind, he says: 

Dickens, of course, was by far the most popular of the three; no 
one since his time has had anything like the same degree of popu- 
larity. No one born in the younger generation can easily under- 
stand, from any illustration that later years can give him, the im- 
mensity of the popular homage which Dickens then enjoyed. He 
was the very best after-dinner speaker I ever heard; I do not quite 
know whom I should put second to him. Sometimes I feel inclined 
to give Mr. James Russell Lowell that second place, and sometimes 
my mind impells me to give it to Lowell's countryman, Mr. Chaun- 
cey Depew. But, so far as my judgment can go, there is no diffi- 
culty about awarding the first place to Dickens. His voice was 
rich, full, and deep, capable of imparting without effort every tone 
and half-tone of emotion, pathetic, inspiriting, or humorous, that 
any spoken words could demand. * * * I have no doubt that his 
atter-dinner speeches were prepared in some fashion, but they car- 
ried with them no hint of preparation. They seemed to come from 
the very heart of the speaker, and to go straight to the heart of the 
listener. 

Thackeray he met in a casual way several times, and 
heard with delight all his lectures: 

Thackeray was not a magnificent declaimer like Dickens ; he made 
no attempt at dramatic effect of any kind ; his voice though clear and 
penetrating and sometimes thrilling, had nothing like the variety 
and richness of intonation which the voice of Dickens could always 
command; he was simply an educated gentleman reading aloud to 
an educated assembly. But he had to the full the unstudied art of 
expression in all that he read; and after a long and vast variety of 
experiences in the hearing of all manner of public men addressing 
audiences from platforms, from pulpits, from judicial benches, and 
from the benches of the Houses of Parliament. I can remember no 
instance of an audience kept more thoroughly in hushed and anxious 
delight— delight blended with terror lest a single word should be 
lost— than was the audience that listened to the closing passage of 
Thackeray's lecture on George III. 

With Tennyson he had a slight personal acquaintance, 
and Robert Browning he came to know very well in later 
years: 

No man, I think, could be a more delightful acquaintance than 
Browning; no man I am sure, could be a more sincere and steady 
friend to his friend. I have met a great many brilliant talkers in 
different countries in my time, 1 do not know that 1 have ever met a 
talker more brilliant, or who could, when hepleased, go more deeply 



into the heart of a subject than Robert Browning. I can say with- 
out the slightest exaggeration, that I never knew Browning to touch 
any subject in conversation which he did not adorn. His talk all 
ran along and sparkled pleasantly like a bright stream on a cheery 
autumnal day. 

He devotes a chapter to Richard Cobden : 
Mo man detested war more than he did; no one distrusted a war 
olicy as a means of benefiting humanity more than he did; but he 
:new that there were principles which must not be yielded even at 
the risk of war, and he always admitted that some of the purest 
patriots the world has ever known, found themselves driven at the 
last to draw the sword. 

Still another chapter treats of the great orator and 
patriot, John Bright: 

I had many talks with Bright on literary subjects, and especially 
on poetry; and while I have often differed from him as to his esti- 
mates and his conclusions, and sometimes could not even accept his 
point of view when forming a judgment of this or that author or 
passage, 1 have always thought that it would not be possible for him 
to say anything about a book which was not in itself interesting and 
which did not offer some fresh idea for consideration 

Of the exile-world of London, Mr. McCarthy writes most 
interestingly. Of Louis Blanc, who, after the Revolution 
which made Louis Napoleon President of the French Re- 
public, found a home and a shelter in England, he says: 

He lived in a small house in St. John's wood region; and he 
worked for his living. He wrote books and essays and gave popular 
lectures. I always account it one of the privileges of my life to have 
known him, and I shall not forget his genial presence, his sym- 
pathetic nature, and the varied charms of his intercourse and bis 
conversation. 

A journey to America brought Mr. McCarthy into touch 
with famous men: 

The New York which I especially knew was not so much the New 
York of the great merchants and traders and bankers and million- 
aires, as of th j authors, the literary men and women, the journalists, 
the public speakers, the preachers, and the exiles. Among the 
earliest acquaintance I made was that of William Cullen Bryant. 
When I knew him he was an old man, so far as the mere record of 
years could make him ; but there was an eternal youthfulness in his 
spirit and in his feelings, and his movements had a vigour and 
elasticity about them which gave little suggestion of old age. 

Soon after reaching New York he met Horace Greeley, 
then editor and principal owner of the New York Tribune, 
and saw much of him during his stay in America, visiting 
him at his town residence and at his country home: 

One day I met him in Broadway, and we stopped and talked to- 
gether. He told me that some one had unexpectedly left him what 
seemed, according to his modestidecs, a considerable sum of money: 
and he added that he had already got rid of it. He told me of some 
benevolent projects in which he had a strong faith, but had had no 
means of assisting by the advance of any funds; and he had be- 
stowed the money in that way, and was now rid of it. " I am glad 
to have had it," he said, "and I am glad that it is gone"; and then 
he added, with an odd, bright smile, "the past is always secure." I 
have thought of the words many times since that day; 1 have little 
doubt that the benevolent enterprise, whatever it was, turned out a 
dead failure; I had no faith in Horace Greeley's gift of making such 
enterprises succeed; but he had done his best, and "the past is al- 
ways secure." I am glad to have known Horace Greeley, and to be 
able to remember his odd sayings, his quaint kindnesses, bis keen 
criticisms, his humorous illustrations, his Spartan austerity of life. 
yet his thoroughly Greek sense of enjoyment and amusement, the 
astonishing contradictions of his wonderful nature. I am glad to 
have known him : "the past is always secure." 

Of Boston's literary men he has much to say. There he 
went with letters of introduction, and it was not long be- 
fore he made the acquaintance of many people whose 
names were as well known in the Old World as in the New. 
James Russell Lowell was at that time professor at the 
University of Harvard, and Mr. McCarthy speaks of him 
with genuine admiration: 

He had a wonderful gift of conversation, and his discourse was all 
conversation and not talk; at least, he did not talk at his listeners 
or stream away as if he were pouring out words for talking sake. I 
have heard more brilliant men in conversation than Lowell, but I 
have heard no man who seemed more gifted by nature with the happy 
faculty which can respond to the thoughts of his hearers and bring 
out their best thoughts in answers to his own.- 

At Lowell's house he met for the first time a young man 
— he was then a very young man — of whom Lowell thought 
highly, and for whom he predicted a brilliant future. The 
prediction has been well fulfilled: 

The young man of those days is Mr. W. D. Howells, whose writ- 
ings are as popular on one side of the Atlantic as on the other, and 
who has, indeed, created a new school of Hction for the delight of 
all novel readers, and for the imitation of some novel writers. 

Of Emerson, Walt Whitman, Oliver Wendell Holmes, 
Longfellow, Charles Sumner, Henry Ward Beecher, 
Henry George, he has many a kindly word to say. Gen 
erals Grant, Sheridan, Meade, Custer, Banks, McDowell 



July 29. 1899. 



SAN I-RANCrsCO NKW9 LKTTKR. 



«3 






all left their impress on his mind, [a 1871 Mr 
again settled down in London, and I; 
that time deal with people whose names will al« . 
membered in literature and art Dante, 
Brown, Burne Jones, Swinburne, William Mi 
Stuart Mill, George Eliot. Dean Stanley. Matthew Ar- 
nold, George Meredith, Charles Reade, Anthony Tr, 
William Black, and scores of other eminent men and 
women with whom it was Mr. McCarthys good fortune to 
come into touch. The book is a worthy companion of "A 
History of Our Own Timr- 

R<"mlo!»cen(M>!t: by JuMln McCarthy, M. P. Harper & Brothers. Pub 
■libera. New York. For sale at Tbe Emporium, 9 Tola. 13 GO. 



Pictorial England Cassell & Company, of London, have 
And w»ies. just issued in a handsomely bound 
volume a collection of some three hun- 
dred and twenty copyright illustrations, produced by 
photography, which represent scenes of historic interest 
and buildings of note in England and Wales, as well as the 
main features of the scenery. Every lover of the pictur- 
esque will welcome with pleasure these views of a country 
so rich in natural beauty, with a character and charm 
distinctively England's own. The work is very complete 
and diversified. Castles and cathedrals, Houses of Par- 
liament, and the palaces of the Sovereign are pictured, 
and, as far as possible, all the leading features of town 
and country life in England and Wales are represented. 
The illustrations are creditable to both photographers and 
engravers, and the volume is altogether a very interest- 
ing one. It is dedicated, by permission, to "Her Most 
Excellent Majesty Queen Victoria," because "designed to 
illustrate some of the spots of beauty and interest in one 
portion of her dominions." 

Pictorial England and Wales: Cassell & Company, Limited, London, 
Paris and Melbourne. For sale by Payot, Upham & Co. Prloe$3. 

The Short Mr. Merwin- Webster, the author of "The 
Lino War. Short Line War," shows an intimate ac- 
quaintance with the ins and outs of railroad- 
ing. The story turns on the fight for control of a Western 
railroad between two sets of speculators, and the victory 
of Jim Weeks, the president. His struggle for power, 
credit, influence, his energy and his cool, dispassionate 
strategy; his bull-dog tenacity all fitted him for. the battle 
when it came. The character it well drawn, and Jim 
Weeks, who came of good fighting stock, may be taken as 
a typical product of the Middle West. The love story of 
Harvey West and Katherine Porter is a pleasant diver- 
sion from stock manipulation and railroad greed. Jawn 
Donohue, the engineer who makes a run of a hundred and 
three miles in eighty-one minutes in order to land the 
president of the M. & T. in Chicago in time to head off his 
opponent, is well depicted, and some of the minor charac- 
ters are equally well drawn. "The Short Line War" is 
Mr. Merwin- Webster's first novel, and it has met with a 
success that is unusual in an initial effort. 

The Short Line War : by Merwin- Webster. The Macmlllan Co., Pub- 
lishers, New York. For sale by Elder & Shepard. Price. $1.60. 

BOOKS RECEIVED. 

Letitia Berkeley, A. M. : by Josephine Bontecou Steffens. Freder- 
ick A. Stokes Co., Publishers, N. Y. For sale at The Emporium. 

From Sea to Sea : by Kudyard Kipling. Donbleday & McClure 
Co., Publishers, N. Y. For sale at The Emporium. Price, 2 vols., 
$1.50. 

From Comte to Benjamin Kidd: by Robert Mackintosh, M. A., 
D. D. The Macmillan Co., Publishers, New York and London. For 
sale by Elder & Shepard. Price, $1.50. 

The Making of Hawaii: by William Fiemont Blackman. The 
Macmillan Co., Publishers, New York and London. For sale by 
Elder & Shepard. Price, $2.00. 

Tristram Lacy ; by W. H. Mallock. The Macmillan Co., Pub- 
lishers, New Stork, and London. Fur sale by Cunningham, Curtiss 
& Welch. Price, $1.50. 

M. E. B. 

U. S. Goveinmont Buys Typewriters. 
L. & M. Alexander just received an order for ten more Smith 
Premier Typewriters from army headquarters. 

Don't suffer with dyspepsia Baldwin's Dyspepsia Capsules, with 
Baldwin's Health Tablets, will oure. Ferry Drug Store, 8 Market street. 

No other water oan touoh 1 1— Jaokson's Napa Soda. 



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THE AWARD AT 
CHICAGO 1893. 



Joseph Giliotrs Steel Pens, 

Gold Medals, Paris, 1876-1880. These pens are "the 
best Id the world." Sole agent for the United States, 
Mr. Henry Hoe, 01 John street, NewYork. 
Sold by all Stationers. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Hakalau Plantation Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Hakalau Planta- 
tion Co will be held at the office of the company, 3d? Market street, San 
Francisco, Cal. on 

TUESDAY, TBE 1st DAY OF AUGUST, 1899. 
atthehourof 11 o'clock a. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Dlreo- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may be brought before the meeting. Transfer books will close on 
Saturday, July 29, 1899, at 12 o'clock m. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary, 
Office: 327 Market street . San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works, for the election of trustees for tbe ensuing year and the trans- 
action of such other business as may be brought before the meeting, will 
be held at the office of the company, southeast corner of Beale and Howard 
streets, San Francisco, on 

MONDAY, the 7th DAY OF AUGUST, 1899, at 11 o'clook a. m. 

L. R. MEAD, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hana Plantation Company. 
Dividend No. 4, of Fifty Cents per share, of the Hana Plantation Com- 
pany, will be payable at the office of the company, No. 215 Front street. 
San Francisco, on and after Tuesday. August 1, 1890. Transfer books will 
close on Thursday, July 27, 1899, at 3o'clock p. m. 

D. O. BATES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank 
For the half year ending June 30, 1899, a dividend has been deolared 
at the rate of three and six-tenths (8 6-10) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of three (3) per cent, per an- 
num, free of taxes, payable on and after July 1, 1*00. 

S. L. ABBOT JR., Seoretary 
Office— 222 Montgomery street, Mills Building, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Oceanic Steamship Company. 

Dividend No. 95, Fifty cents per share, of the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany, will be payable at tbe office of the company, 327 Market street, on 
and after Tuesday, August 1, 1*00 Transfer books will close on Wednes- 
day. July 26, 1899, at 3 o'clock p. m. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 



lM06t St W.LUAM WOLFF* CO, ! 

< AS-aiv'w^ -mr~ Paclflo Coast Agents, f 

'i! aTTl— J .asanas*. 329 Market St., S. F. % 

I Li?anaoii % 

\ (The largest and oldest champagne house in the world.) \ 

J» White Seal (Grand Cuvee) of exceptional J 

% bouquet and dryness. —Court Journal. 2 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1899. 




ifikft&Hz J&rfrtf 



The issue of shares in the new oil com- 
Oil Shares panies floated of late in this city has been 
In Demand, well received by the investing public. The 

fact seems to be fuliy appreciated that 
a marvelously profitable industry is now in course of de- 
velopment, with resources far beyond any calculation at 
the present moment. Few of the new companies have ex- 
perienced any difficulty in disposing of their working cap- 
ital when the names at the head of the enterprise are 
such as to merit confidence. Of course some of these en- 
terprises may result in failure, owing to the fact that the 
land taken up may prove barren, but it is safe to say that 
those located within what is already recognized as the oil 
zone will earn large profits for those who have invested in 
them. A large amount of land has been taken up by 
speculators, who will try to market it at a large profit to 
unsuspecting buyers, and for this reason the necessity for 
extreme caution is again urged in the selection of invest- 
ments of this kind. Where no oil has been developed over 
a large tract of land remote from what is recognized as a 
productive area, it will be safer to let the promoters do 
some development work on their own account to substan- 
tiate statements regarding possibilities when the sinking 
of wells begins. Wildcat operators of the old school are 
fully alive to the situation, and they will not fail to take 
advantage of another opportunity to bunco the public. 
They will not likely appear in the open for judicious rea- 
sons, but it will be difficult for them to screen their 
identity with an enterprise entirely, and the connection 
will be the best warning to investors to avoid an entangle- 
ment which can only result in having their pockets picked 
by some sleight-of-hand performance. There is still some 
talk of creating an open market for these stocks, and in 
view of the apathy shown by the local stock boards, the 
suggestion is now under consideration to start a separate in- 
stitution, to be known as the Oil Exchange, which will deal 
exclusively in shares of the several companies. With the 
strong financial backing which many of these companies 
possess, there is no reason why their shares should not 
prove a highly interesting feature in local speculation. 
The town is lacking something of the kind very badly to 
liven it up and put money in circulation. 

Somebody hailing from San Francisco 

The Kern-Rand swings a very free axe in the London 

Company. Financial News at a project fathered by 

what is known as the Kern-Rand Com- 
pany, a Los Angeles incorporation, to develop electricity 
on the Kern river, and convey power to Los Angeles, a 
distance of 150 miles. The company has expended about 
$10,000 in preliminary surveys, and has now sent an Eng- 
lishman named Adams to England to get the remainder of 
the money required, $1,990,000. The man with the axe 
says they expect to deliver 20,000 horse-power in Los 
Angeles, and clear about twenty per cent, per annum on 
$2,000,000. The principal power users in the City of 
Angels told him, he says, that they were not in favor of 
the scheme for the reason that the line was so likely to 
be "washed out" in winter and " burned out" in summer 
that they could not take power from it. The line, it is 
said, will cross two mountain ranges and a desert, and, 
assuming that the power can be developed, the continuity 
of supply cannot safely be counted on. The axe wielder 
continues: " Greater power at a fourth of the cost can be 
obtained within sixty miles of Los Angeles, on the Mohave 
river, but the control of that dam site is in the hands of 
some men who are not in a position to handle it. I under- 
stand that Adams has gone to Manchester, or some of the 
large manufacturing centers, and that he will get the 
money. I hope not, as I think it extremely doubtful 
whether the scheme can be carried out for $2,000,000, and 
still more doubtful whether it will pay." The washing 
and burning out suggested seems the weakest point of the 
argument against an enterprise of the kind, the distance 
involved in transmission and the ability to generate a large 
volume of power being more vital points in discussing 
the true merits of the enterprise. 



The State Miners' Association was 
An Attempt to placed in a rather peculiar position 
Undermine tne Law. the other day, as opposed to the 
Caminetti Act, which it was said 
they would endeavor to wipe off the statute books. Of 
course there was never any intention on the part of the 
association to do anything of the kind, the statement to 
the contrary being based upon a misunderstanding of the 
situation, which led to the declaration of another war be- 
tween the people of the hills and the valley folk, represented 
by.the so-called anti-debris association. The trouble arose 
over a suit brought in the name of Sutter County against 
the Red Dog mining company. This company, having 
complied with all the provisions of the Caminetti Act, and 
received permission to begin operations from the State 
Debris Commission, and under the supervision of its officials 
has been working its mines. Now comes the county of 
Sutter with an injunction from a State court restraining 
the owners from further work, nullifying the action of the 
State Debris Commission, a legally constituted body, en- 
dowed with full powers by United States enactment. The 
State Miners' Association, as a body, has taken up the 
fight of the Red Dog people, and proposes to settle the 
question at once and for all time, of interference by State 
officials with the acts of the Debris Commission. In what 
is known as the Kate Hayes case, the United States courts 
have confirmed the constitutionality of the Caminetti Act, 
and it remains to be seen what the State court will do in 
the matter. If they declare the act constitutional, the 
State Debris Commission will be secured against fur- 
ther attacks of the kind, and mine owners will be safe to 
work their mines subject to the law of the land without 
any outside interference, which under the circumstances 
can only be designated as an outrage. It is certain, how- 
ever, that the Caminetti Act will not be wiped out of ex- 
istence without a vigorous fight by the State Miners' As- 
sociation, which was the main factor in securing its pas- 
sage. 

The past week has been very dull in the 
The Comstock Comstock mining market. This is due 
Share Market, in a large measure to the unsettled con- 
dition of affairs in regard to the con- 
templated changes in the methods of working the mines. 
The contract for the supply of cheap power has not yet 
been made, but it may be let at any moment now, when 
the committee in charge is in possession of the necessary 
data to enable it to act safely with a due regard for future 
contingencies. In a case of this kind, "make haste 
slowly" is a good motto, and while the delay may be oner- 
ous for the moment, it is the safest policy in the long run. 
Everything is now ready to begin cross-cutting on the 
1800-level of Con. Cal.- Virginia, and this has served to 
give tone to the stock for some days past. Work is 
being pushed in the middle mines, and Potosi has been a 
strong and active feature of the market, keying up the 
neighboring stocks in good shape. Some of the South-end 
shares have looked firmer of late, and a disposition is ap- 
parent on the part of dealers to take them up at the 
present depressed valuations for a turn. Business, while 
quiet with the commission houses, has picked up a little 
toward the close of the week, and on the whole the situa- 
tion is remarkably healthy, both here and at Virginia 
City. 

The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street is 

More Forged in trouble again. Forgers have once 

Notes Afloat, more succeeded in duplicating notes by 

photo-lithograpby, and no one knows how 

many of the counterfeits are now in circulation. So far 

only £10 notes have turned up, all bearing date May 21, 

1898, and all numbered K-69 50422. They only lack the 

distinguishing characteristics of all Bank of England notes, 

the watermark in the paper. It might be added that a 

£10 note of the same number was actually issued by one 

bank, but it has long since been presented and paid. 

HM. KEEFER, largely interested in mining in 
, Boundary Creek mining district, British Columbia, 
is in the city after an absence of fourteen years. He re- 
ports mining interests in that section as coming rapidly 
to the front. 

Bad breath ? Bad taste? No appetite? Bilious? Dyspepsia, sure I 
Baldwin's Dyspepsia Capsules, with Baldwin's Health Tablets — immediate 
relief; permanent cure. Perry Drug Store, 8 Market street. 



July aa, 1899. 



. n-R. 



<5 



N'ow that copper smelt. 
Min«r» Wuh up all over the State, it Med 1 
Gr«*n H«ir. any one If a rival of the Titian Monde and 
the ivory black cephalic adornment of the 
brunette type, should appear in tool 
For years past a race of green-haired men ha* • 1 
parts of the old world where the smelting of 
carried on extensively. In due time Keswick will likely 
be heard from in the same way, and the appearance of the 
phenomena will serve to create a shortlived sensation. 

Following are the transactions on the 
Stock and Bond Stock and Bond Exchange for the 
Quotations. week beginning July 21st and ending 

T..I.. •>•*, U 



July 27th. 

Miscellaneous Bosos. 

D.S.1. 

Contra Costa Water 5\ 

Los Angeles Killwav 5*, 

Market Street Railway 0", 

Market Street 1st Cons. Mortgage 5*,. 

Nor. Paclno Coast Railway by. 

Northern Rjr ot Cal 5\ 

Oakland Transit Co 6". 

S.F.*N. P.5% 

S. F & S. J. V. Ry 5*i 

8.V. W. W. *y. 

STOCKS. 
Water. Shares. 

Contra Costa Water ... 3.71>5 

Spring Valley Water... S94 

Gas and Electric. 

F.quitablo Gas 100 

Oakland Gas ... ion 

Pacific Gas Improvement 95 

Gas and Electric 560 

Street Railroads. 

Market Street 333 

Powders. 

Slant.. 810 

Vigorlt 200 

Scgar Stocks 



Sales 

. . 6.000 & ir»H 

. 5.000 c* HOti-lll 

. a.ooj is 106H 
.. 5.000 

. 33.000 @ ll«V 

. . 4,000 ® luV,-10f.', 

.. I.OO11 « HIM 

a no 110M 

. P.00O ® I13M 

.. 2.000 @ 115 

.. 1.000 <a i04x 



Highest. 

79* 
102 



4* 
4!* 

72< a 



Hana P. Co 

Hawaiian C&SCo 

Hutchinson S Plantation Co. 
Kllauea 3. Plantation Co . . . 
Makaweli 



810 
150 
955 
5 
615 

Gnomes PI 110 

PaauhauSPCo 895 



63 



72* 
2X 



\1% 
99* 



40* 
40 



Lowest. 
74X 
101X 

4H 

r, 

78* 
71« 

eiM 

7IM 
2« 



17S 

95 

31« 

29 

47« 

40 

39X 



115 
90 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Alaska Packers Association — 100 118 

Oceanic S S Co ... 350 91 

Bankof California 43 205 

First National Bank 10 827 V4 227* 

The transactions during the week amounted to 85,000 bonds and 
10.330 shares, as against 74,500 bonds and 8,071 shares of the 
previous week. 

On Wednesday afternoon the Board of Directors of the Contra 
Costa Water Company met and decided to pay a dividend of 40 cents 
a month on the stock, a large number of shares in which Company 
have been bought during the week. 

The news that Mauna Loa, the volcano on the island of Hawaii, 
was in active eruption, seems to have had a depressing effect upon 
the stock of the Hutchinson Plantation, but there seems little reason 
to fear that the plantation will be touched by the lava flow. 

Gas and Electric Stocks have been little dealt in during the week, 
but the market on this class of investments has been firm, with lit- 
tle fluctuation in prices. 



THE Board of Directors of the Mechanics' Institute 
held a meeting last Tuesday eveniDg, at which the ap- 
proaching exhibition to be given at the pavilion was con- 
sidered. Several communications were received concern- 
ing the fair. The University of California will have a fine 
exhibit, including designs from the college of mechanical 
arts. The directors have determined to offer a prize for 
the best poster of the fair. All posters offered in compe- 
tition will be given a place in the general exhibition. A 
communication was received from C. Tobey, Jr., suggest- 
ing that architects and civil engineers be invited to submit 
plans in competition for some public improvement, the 
prize to go to the plans or idea obtaining the largest vote 
during the exhibition. From present indications the ex- 
hibition of 1899 will be of unusual interest. 

One application of Smith's Dandruff Pomade stops itchine scalp: 
three to six applications removes all dandruff. Try it. Price 50 ■ 
cents, at all druggists. Sample free. Address Smith Brothers, 
Fresno, Cal. 

Why not wear swell clothing? Litchfield & Co., 12 Poststreet, 
make the most fashionable and fine looking business suits seen on 
the streets. Their military garments are always faultlessly made of 
the very finest mate rials. 

Gentlemen can have private rooms for their luncheon without 
extra charge, at the Maison Eiche, corner Grant avenue and Geary 
street. Champagne reduced to $4 per quart and $2 per pint. 



OBITUARY. 

kiaut, millionaire, and wld 
know. nexpectedly died . 

ae, 1316 Taylor street, last Monday evening, after a 
brief and apparently not severe illness. At his bt" 
when he passed awav, were his wife, ami his chilil- 
iv Ham Ti'vis. Hugh Tevls, William s. Tevis, and Mrs. 

in Blanding. Mrs Kred Sharon, another daughter, 
is at present In Paris. The financial history of the Pacific 
;tnd the organization of many of its great corpora- 
tions, would be incomplete without a record of the labors 
and services of Lloyd Tevis. He came to California in 
1- 19 from Kentucky, in which State be was born on March 
20, 1824. Traiued [o the law, he followed various pursuits 
with indifferent success before coming to the West. In 
1860 he met J. B. Haggin in Sacramento, and there en- 
tered into a partnership which terminated only with his 
death. He rarely took any part in politics, and delighted 
in directing large financial transactions. As a lawyer he 
was recognized as the advocate of compromise, and his 
largest fees were earned in settling differences and uniting 
warring interests. His judgment was universally sound, 
and his mature opinions were sought and highly respected 
both in the financial world and legal profession. He held 
immense quantities of land in Kern and other counties, 
and much stock. His realty in the city was also valuable. 
His estate is variously estimated at from $20,000,000 to 
to $25,000,000. His family, by whom he was deeply loved, 
are prostrated by his demise. The remains were deposited 
in the Wilson mausoleum at Laurel Hill Cemetery on Wed- 
nesday. The funeral services were private, and were held 
at the late residence of Mr. Tevis, Dr. Foute officiating. 

On Friday, the 21st, Mrs. C. C. Mc- 
Mrs. C. C. Mclver. Iver, the wife of the well-known 

wine grower of San Jose, died at 
Mission San Jose. Mrs. Mclver's death was not unex- 
pected, as she had for years been a sufferer from asthma. 
Everything that medical skill and loving attention of a de- 
voted husband and family was done to prolong her life, 
but in vain. Mrs. Mclver was the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. L. Stevens, of Romeo, Michigan. She married, 
and sixteen years ago came to this State, where the family 
has lived ever since. Her husband subsequently became 
heavily interested in wine growing, and possesses some of 
the most valuable vineyards in this part of California. 
Her father died about a year ago, but her mother is still 
living. JMrs. Mclver left a husband, a son, Stephen, fifteen 
years old, and two daughters — Katherine, thirteen, and 
Stefney, eleven years old. The funeral took place from 
the residence last Monday and was largely attended. Mrs. 
Mclver was a most lovable character, and had many ac- 
quaintances. Her death is deeply mourned, and much 
sympathy is felt for the family. 

" Thb Frenchman likes his native wine, 
The German likes his beer, 
The Irishman likes his whiskey straight 
Because it gives good cheer; 
The Englishman likes his 'alt and 'air 
Because it makes him frisky; 
But they all go back on their favorite drink 
For Jesse Moore "AA" Whiskey." 



Insist Upon Having Your Ticket to New York, Boston, or 
Other Eastern Cities read over the Nickel Plate (N. Y. C. & St. 
L. R. K.), the popular low-rate short line. Quick time, unexcelled 
accommodations, and no extra fares charged. Jay W. Adams, 
Pacific Coast Passenger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

There is no economy in your buying a new carpet. Take the old 
ones up and send them to Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Works at 
353 Tehama street, where they will be cleaned beautifully and re- 
laid for a small sum. While the folks are in the country is just the 
time to have this work done. Spaulding's is cheapest and best. 



Alger has retired from the Cabinet but this long expected event 
has nothing to do with the quality of J. V. Cutter and Argonaut 
whiskeys, which are always of uniform flavor, excellent quality and 
mellow. They are the finest liquors sold anywhere in the country. 
E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, sole agents for the United States 



Champagne Imports In 1898 
Aggregated 242,319 cases, of which 86,855 cases were G. H. Mumm's 
Extra Dry, the acme, of perfection.. Bottles will bear green neck- 
band and star label. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1899. 




fciCT/' 



WEDDINGS still con- 
tinue to be almost 
the only events now tak- 
ing place, and of these 
there are quite a num- 
ber worthy of mention; 
for instance, what might be termed the international mar- 
riage, of which St. John's Presbyterian Church was the 
scene last Tuesday evening, when the Union Jack and the 
Stars and Stripes entwined, combined with flowers and 
palms, formed the decorations of the chancel at the wed- 
ding of Miss Annie McKay and Charles C. Williamson, 
whose nuptial knot was tied by the Rev. George Eldridge. 
When the bridal party entered the church two little 
flower girls, the Misses Emma and Kate McKay, prettily 
costumed in pink, strewed blossoms for the bride to tread 
upon. She was escorted to the altar by her father, and 
attended by Miss Ruth Colby as maid of honor, and the 
Misses Alice Vail and Charlotte Redmond as bridesmaids. 
A. Hunter supported the groom as best man. The bride 
wore a robe of white satin, a tulle veil, and wreath of 
orange blossoms. Miss Redmond looked very pretty in 
mauve silk, and Miss Vail in pink silk. A reception and 
supper followed the church ceremonial at the home of the 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. McKay, on Howard 
street, and on Tuesday the young couple departed for 
Santa Cruz to pass their honeymoon. 

The wedding of Miss Alice Hinchman and Walter Cook 
took place at the home of the bride's mother in Everett 
street, Alameda, at noon on Monday last, the Rev. T. J. 
Lacey officiating. It was a pretty home ceremony, Mrs. 
Hinchman giving her daughter into the keeping of the 
groom, the bride's sister, Gertrude, appearing as maid of 
honor, and her nieces, the Misses Lucretia and Margery 
Mastick, as her bridesmaids; W. B. Hinchman was best 
man to the groom. After the bridal dejeuner Mr. and 
Mrs. Cook left for their honeymoon trip to Lake Tahoe. 

October 5tb is the date set for the wedding of Miss Sara 
Harnden of Alameda and James W. Wilder, of Honolulu. 
From New York comes the news of the engagement of 
Miss Lucy Chapin, who is still held in warm remembrance 
in San Francisco, to William Wallace Wells of Gotham. 

All who enjoyed the beautiful spectacle of a "night in 
Venice," given at Belvedere a couple of years ago, will be 
glad to hear that it is to be repeated next month, with 
the probabilities that it will far exceed in completeness of 
detail the first one. The committees are already hard at 
work with the different arrangements, and promise that 
everything will be done to make it a brilliant success, indi- 
cations pointing to that result. 

Trinity Church, the oldest Episcopal one in San Fran- 
cisco, celebrated its semi-centennial anniversary last Sun- 
day. The floral decorations were particularly beautiful, 
and , were under the supervision of Mrs. William Alvord, 
who came up from Del Monte especially for the occasion. 
Bishop Nichols consecrated the bronze memorial tablet of 
the church foundation, after which Mr. C. V. S. Gibbs, 
who is the sole survivor of the original founders, gave a 
very interesting account of the progress of the parish. 
The music was under the direction of Mr. H. J. Stewart, 
who presided at the organ. 

Last week mention was made of the loss society had sus- 
tained through the closing of the Borel house by the de- 
parture of the family for Europe. But this week it has 
met with an even greater loss, for the Tevis mansion on 
Taylor street, which has in the past been the scene of so 
many brilliant functions, was to have been re-opened with 
its pristine glory for numerous festivities the coming win- 



ter, consequent upon the social debut of Miss Florer.ce 
Breckinridge; but it will now remain closed, owing to the 
death of her grandfather, Mr. Lloyd Tevis, which took 
place on Monday last. 

Last Saturday, Jerome A. Hart, editor and proprietor 
of the San Francisco Argonaut, was married to Miss Alice 
Ann Clark, of Santa Clara County, the ceremony being 
performed by the Rev. Arthur H. Barnhisel of the Los 
Gatos Presbyterian Church, at Weywold, the family resi- 
dence. Few men are better known in this city or State 
than Mr. Hart, and Miss Clark is the oldest daughter of 
the late W. S. Clark, the capitalist, of Santa Clara County. 
The ceremony was private, owing to the recent bereave- 
ment in the Clark family. The couple are spending their 
honeymoon in the southern part of the State. 

Mrs. M. S. Latham has been receiving the congratula- 
tions of her friends on the probable near return of her son, 
who has been spending the last eighteen months in the 
Klondike. 

Mrs. E. B. Crocker, accompanied by her daughter, 
Mrs. J. Sloat Fassett, and her children, and Miss M. C. 
Field, arrived from New York last Sunday, and General 
and Mrs. C. P. Eagan from their visit to Honolulu, their 
son Charlie coming with them. Another arrival of the 
week was Col. Neil DenDison, who several decades ago was 
a prominent feature of our social life while acting as 
Aide-de-Camp to General McDowell. He is at present a 
resident of Colorado. 

Tennis will be one of the features of the August festivi- 
ties at Del Monte, the 18th and 19th being the days set 
apart for the tournament, for which several handsome 
prizes will be given. Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Laton, Mr. and 
Mrs. Garrett McEuerny, Mrs. I. N. Walter and family, 
Lansing Kellogg, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Walker are among 
the recent additions to the list of arrivals at Del Monte. 
Miss Lillian Follis is there as the guest of her cousin, Miss 
Jenny Flood; Miss Leontine Blakeman, who left this week 
for a visit to Lake Tahoe, Mr. and Mrs. Homer King and 
their daughters go to Del Monte for the month of August. 

Consul John Simpson, Mrs. Simpson, and their pretty 
daughters, have been dividing their time between. Deer 
Park Inn and the Tallac House, Lake Tahoe; the W. F. 
Herrins, James Carolans, Miss Norma Bachman, Mrs. C. 
Sachs, Miss Wangenheim, and Mrs. J. B. Babcock have 
also been visiting the latter place; Miss Charlotte Ellin- 
wood, Dr. Mackenzie, Miss Bessie Shreve, Harry Hough- 
ton, Miss Minnie Houghton, the Misses Brigham, Miss 
Patricia Cosgrove, and Mrs. Horace Hill have been guests 
at Glen Alpine Springs. 

Mr. W. S. Duval, Miss Duval, W. W. Foote, Miss Gar- 
ber, Mrs. W. S. Goodfellow are among those at the Napa 
Soda Springs. Among the acquisitions looked for in San 
Rafael next week are the W. I. Kips, including Mrs. 
Edie, who have been at the Napa Soda Springs since 
their return from the Yosemite Valley. They will remain 
at San Rafael a month or six weeks. The Misses Jol- 
liffe will spend the rest of the season in San Rafael. 

Dr. and Mrs. Albert Hiller, Mrs. Sussman, Miss Alice 
Sussman, Mrs. Colbourne, Miss Maye Colbourne, and C. 
G. Hooker are among those who have recently inscribed 
their names at Castle Crag; Mrs. Gordon Blanding, Miss 
Susie Blanding, Miss Lena Blanding, and Mrs. Henry 
Wood have returned from their visit to that delightful 
summer tavern. 

Among the guests at the Hotel Belvedere are Mrs. 
and Miss Nokes, Mrs. M. E. Pendleton, Dr. and Mrs. 
Frank Wilson, Judge and Mrs. J. M. Sewall. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Wilson, Miss Adelaide Deming, have 
returned from Shasta Springs. 

The guests of Hotel Belvedere, with some of their 
friends, played progressive euchre on Thursday evening 
of last week, There were eight tables, and the contest 
for the handsome prizes was animated. The victory was 
won by Mrs. E. Scott, first prize; Mr. Chas. Kenyon, sec- 

PERSONAL— If your hair is not satisfactory it can bo made so 
safely, quickly, lastingly, and at slight expense. Gray hair 
restored to its original color, bleached hair to any shade, falling hair 
stopped, luxuriant hair produced. Booklet and particulars free. Imperial 
Chem. Mfg. Co.. 292 Fifth ave.. New York, Dept. No. 66. 

In San rancisco sold by : GOLDSTEIN & COHN 822 Market street ; S. 
STKOZYNSKJ, 24 Geary street, OWL DRUG COMPANY, 1128 Market 
street; and all druggists and hairdressers. 



July 39, 1899. 



ISCO VKWS LRTTKIL 



17 



ond. Mr. ('•. Howard Thompson winning 

priie. Afterwards refreshments were served and a social 

hour enjoyed. 

rns and her daughter, I> just 

returned from Portland and vicinity, where thev have 
spent the summer. Her married daujjh- H 

Loof, will leave for Santa Barbara in August to join her 
busband, who has charire of the construction work of the 
Southern Pacific, connecting Santa Barbara and San Luis 
Obispo, where she will reside for the next year, or till the 
work is completed. 

A considerable number of San Franciscans were at the 
Country Club and at Tocoloma, in Marin county, during the 
week. Among others were Herman Oelrichs, Ed. Berg, 
George Maxwell and family, Mr. and Mrs. H. Block. Miss 
Elise Block, E. Hoffman, J. Willigrod, and many others. 
The fishing and shooting in Marin county is tine, and the 
members of the Country Club have killed several fine 
bucks, while the take of trout with the fly has been satis- 
factory. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Levy, of 1302 Post street, are re- 
ceiving congratulations od all sides over their new grand- 
son, born to their only daughter, Dahlia, whose marriage 
some time ago to Mr. Sol Loeb, a wealthy merchant of 
New Orleans, was quite an event in local society circles. 

After several years of indefinable existence, the San 
Mateo Hunt Club has effected permanent organization by 
the election of a board of nine directors, Messrs. Duncan 
Hayne, J. H. P. Howard, W. O. B. McDonough, E. D. 
Beylard, F. J. Carolan, John Parrott, Hugh Hume, J. J. 
Moore, and Walter Hobart. The club will undertake to 
revive the ancient pastime of kings among the glades, the 
pastoral scenes, and sylvan vales of San Mateo County. It 
is a royal outdoor spoi t, and ladies as well as gentlemen 
find in it excitement and relaxation. There are quite a 
number of ladies at Burlingame who ride well. Foxes, ken- 
nels, hunters and all will add a new and picturesque fea- 
ture to the pleasure of that beautiful section. 

Last Monday evening Frank S. Johnson gave a most en- 
joyable and rather original entertainment to a consider- 
able number of San Rafael friends and guests from this 
city. The entertainment consisted of a clam-bake, which 
took place on the beach in view of McNear's Point, where 
every arrangement had been made for the pleasure of Mr. 
and Mrs. Johnson's friends. The guests met in front of 
Hotel Rafael, where, in comfortable conveyances, one of 
which was an immense hay wagon, and preceded by their 
host and hostess, drove to the scene of the out-door feast. 
The adjacent trees had been hung with many Chinase 
lanterns, whose soft and twinkling lights gave an added 
charm and picturesqueness to the beautiful sight. Tables 
were covered with blossomed boughs of crab apples, 
peaches, plums and pears. The clam-bake was a veritable 
feast — the succulent bivaLves, with corn, trout, chicken 
and sweet potatoes, formed a feed fit for the gods. Danc- 
ing and music followed the clam-bake. There were more 
than forty in the party. 

Ed. Pollitz was a passenger on the steamship Aus- 
tralia, which sailed for the Orient on last Wednesday. 

Health Giving 
Qualities to infants are contained in every can of Gail Borden 
Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. " It saved the baby's life " is the 
message received from thousands of mothers. Eagle stands first. 

Luncheon at home however delightful, sometimes becomes 
monotonous, and a change is desired. Ladies of the city have quite 
a fashion of dropping into Swain's, 213 Sutter street, for midday or 
early afternoon luncheon. The service at Swain's and the delicate 
menu and the quiet exclusive atmosphere attract the very best peo- 
ple in the city. Orders for breads, pies, cakes, etc. left or telephoned 
will be promptly delivered. 

Under the new management of Galindo & Epthberg, Eoemer's 
Vienna Cafe at 205 Kearny street is fast becoming one of the most 
popular in the city. The service is unexcelled and visitors to this 
city will always find delicious dishes at moderate prices, and polite 
attendants. 



Wl oonsider scientific testimony to be of the first importance, tint we 
also have letters from ladies all over tbe land telling ot the merits ot 
Cbemb de Lis tor the complexion. It is harmless and eventually 'creates 
a perfect complexion." 

A Jaokson's Napa Soda Lemanade is up to the Queen's taste. 



,R. t rcux aouRtuDt oricntal 

OHIAM, On MAOICAL •CAUTirifN. 
RetnoTwi T»n. I 

f ' 



1 and 




ELECTRIC LAUNDRY is our name, 
Linen we clean, make 
Each article so bright and clean 
Can see your face in polished sheen. 
To catch us quick by telephone 
Ring up our call, South 231. 
In all our work we aim to please, 
Can do so with the greatest ease. 
Let him who well deserves high praise 
And does his best in all his days, 
Unite with all good men and true, 
Nor fail to give each one his due. 
Do this and we will keep you clean, 
Rinse from your conscience all things mean, 
You surely want thus to be seen. 

ELECTRIC LAUNDRY CO., 835 FoLSOM St. 



LA GRANDE LAUNDRY, Telephone Bush IS. 

Principal office, 23 Powell St., opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch— 11 Taylor St., near Golden Gate avenue. 

Laundry— Twelfth St., between Folsom and Howard Sts., San Francisco 

CITY STREET iriPROVEMENT CO., 

FIFTH FLOOR MILLS BUILDING, S. F. 



Proprietors 

Bitumen nines. 

Santa Cruz and King City, 
Monterey County, Cal 



Contractors for all kinds 
of street work, bridges, 
and railway construc- 
tion, wharves, jetties 
and seawalls. 



DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



813 Sutter Street, 
Tel. East 629. 



Dentist 



H. ISAAC dONES, M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office, 384 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton Sts., S. F. 

Hours, 10 A. m. to 4 p. m. Sunday by appointment. 

Tel. Brant 101. 

r»R n F nilNNF Of Olympic Club, Chiropodist, at Luoke's 
LM\. U. U. UUI11U, Shoe Store, 832 Market Street, S. F. 
Hours from 9 A. M. to 18 M. ; 1 P..M. to 6 P. H. Ingrowing toe nails a 
specialty. 



F. C 




F, C. corsets y I 

Both Stylish and | 

Elegant. : : : ». 

Made of fine materials. Sold by leading stores % 



w*w*mf»^<»™«™0W*^*yt!+'rt&-ns* ni 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1899. 




" Hear the Crier t " "What the devil art thou?" 
"One that will play the devil, sir, with you." 

EVER since Adam and Eve sauntered through the fig- 
leafy bowers of fair Eden, beautiful woman has held 
the adoration, paralyzed the brain and manipulated the 
purse-strings of masculinity. Old age, hoarv heads, thin 
hams, as Hamlet says, rheumy eyes and wrinkled necks, 
perk and smirk and cut such silly pranks as make one 
sick when female youth and beauty smile on them. As 
connoisseurs of beauty, uncle Daniel Cole and grandpa Wil- 
liam Montgomery of the Mint have suddenly developed 
gallant propensities and unerring judgment. If one 
doubt, let him go to the Mint in this city, and he will see a 
rare and charming aggregation, from the staturesque 
brunette to the melting blonde. Twenty ladies who were 
verging upon the sear, the yellow leaf, grown gray in the 
service, find themselves looking for work, while in their 
seats sit twenty of the fairest female products of Califor- 
nia. Twenty sweet and smiling buds; and uncle Dan and 
grandpa Billie sit in the reflected glory of raven locks, 
auburn curls, flashing eyes, and rounded forms compared 
to which Tom Moore's Bower of Roses by Bendemere's 
Stream is a cheap and dreary desert. 

SCHOOLS open Monday in San Francisco. The Crier 
hopes, in view of the fact that funds are low, that the 
higher branches which ingenious teachers have been add- 
ing to the curriculum may be dropped. Let the cooking de- 
partment — the pastries, pies, and cakes — the crochet and 
scalloping classes, and all the fool departments that have 
absorbed the time of children and the taxes of citizens — 
let these drop into innocuous desuetude. The perspiring 
thousands of to-day, of whom the Crier is one, whose 
youngsters fill the public schools, are more concerned in 
pork and beans, in corned beef and cabbage, and the gen- 
tle art of sewing on buttons, than they are in the flimsy 
gewgaws tacked on to the school system of this city, for 
the purpose of giving a score of thrifty instructors, who 
do not instruct, fat jobs. If young ladies desire to do 
painting and art needle work, while their mothers are 
getting out the weekly wash in the back yard, the average 
taxpayer should not be called upon to gratify that flatter- 
ing idiosyncracy. Give us more common sense and fewer 
so-called "higher branches." 

WHEN smiling May and sour December make alliance, 
with a mother-in-law looming grimly behind, not all 
the squalls will be little ones. Witness the cheerful ad- 
vertising Joseph Boardman, the wealthy resident of Mod- 
ern Athens, is receiving. Marrying a schoolgirl of seven- 
teen, the tropic old gentleman is sued by an old time flame 
for a half million dollars, damage for a lacerated, yearn- 
ful heart. Desiring to save his gold from the avenger, 
the aged husband is urged to deed his wealth to his wife. 
Between the clamorous attack of one and the coy in- 
sistence of the other, he is between the devil and the 
deep sea. If he yield to the tender mercies of wife and 
mother-in-law, he might be found superfluous as the hub 
of the charming domestic wheel; if he stand by his guns, 
the fair plaintiff at law may wrest away his well-filled de- 
posit vault. 

WARRANT clerks in the police courts are not in their 
places when they are wanted. They put in a half 
day at work, lock up at 11:30 for lunch, and frequently fail 
to come back until nine o'clock next morning. When they 
do happen to be in they are often chargeable with incivil- 
ity, not to say insolence. They should be arrested for ob- 
taining money under false pretenses whenever they sign 
their salary warrants. Clerks Proudt and R. H. E. Lyons 
are particularly effective as demonstrators of official un- 
worth. 



WHEN volunteers were called for last year for service 
in the Philippines, hundreds of San Francisco boys 
promptly gave up lucrative positions and went to the war. 
In many, if not in all cases, it was understood that the 
places voluntarily vacated would be restored to them when 
they should return. The Crijsr hears, now, that some of 
the men who have reached home find quite a different state 
of affairs. Their employers who, in the temporary fever 
of the occasion, were ready to promise anything, have for- 
gotten their pledges, and the volunteers find themselves 
out in the cold world with an overstock of glory but with- 
out employment and without money. Such cases should 
be made public, and the weight of public opinion brought 
to bear upon these gentlemen of short memory. 

THE pull, evidently, is not confined to San Francisco. 
A gilded youth of Alameda, wild with drink, made a 
midnight cavalry charge about the streets of that quiet 
hamlet. He was intercepted by several policemen, and 
for this activity one of them has a bullet-pierced hat to 
tell of his narrow escape. The youth was let off with a 
light fine for disturbing the peace and discharging fire- 
arms within the town limits. Perhaps the forty dollars 
paid by him represented the value of the officer whose 
hat he perforated. Without doubt, the shooter should 
have killed the policeman in order to escape without any 
fine at all. 

GOVERNOR W. A. Poynton, of Nebraska, should not 
be disturbed by the statement in some of San Fran- 
cisco's morning papers, that he sneaked out of his State 
in order to meet some mythical parties and "complete a 
remarkable political deal." His Excellency may be some- 
what startled at the active imagination of San Francisco 
reporters and their truly democratic familiarity with his 
name. Although this is rather an unpleasant introduction, 
and a not very courteous reception of a stranger within 
our gates, the Governor should remember that it is gen- 
erally thought that God also made the reporters. 

ONE Allen was arrested upon suspicion of having bogus 
lottery tickets in his possession. His plea for clem- 
ency was that the tickets were not bogus. There may be 
grades of badness, but the average male has a very clear 
idea that all lottery tickets are bogus. The ordinances 
of the city recognize no distinction. The possession of 
such tickets is an offense punishable by law. There must 
be a difference, however, as some frauds pay for protec- 
tion against other thieves, while both prey upon the public. 

WHEN Malietoa beheaded his enemies, and his followers 
bore the ghastly evidences of their savagery about on 
pike poles, the press of our country shivered and shook at 
the monstrous recital. Malietoa, so far as the records 
show, failed to burn bis prisoners at the stake, neither did 
his soldiers chop them into small bits first, and kill them 
afterwards. We have something to learn from King 
Malietoa, evidently. 

SA. LOWENTHAL and Herbert Choynski, both 
, windy lawyers, engaged in a windy war last Tuesday 
in Judge Troutt's court. Their remarks concerning each 
other were not at all complimentary, but this fact need 
not carry an insinuation that they were not telling the 
truth. The Judge intervened to stop the bloodless fray. 
It was a most un-Christian quarrel: Choynski and Lowen- 
thal. 

IT will be interesting to know if Crit. Thornton has yet 
paid that $50 fine imposed upon him by a Judge, the 
dignity of whose court had been slightly fractured by an 
assault conducted rather disastrously by the sanguinary 
Thornton upon a brother attorney, who had the temerity 
to insinuate that the noted lawyer's examination of a lady 
witness was both irrelevant and ungentlemanly. 

STRANGE people, those Chicagoans. They sent a de- 
tective all the way to Port Angeles, in the State of 
Washington, to capture a jury briber. Their ideas of the 
necessities of the criminal classes is most uncharitable. 
We should have to send a detective no further than the 
City Hall to capture so common a rascal as a jury fixer. 

S DISPATCH from New York says that all the com- 
pressed air companies are going into a great trust. 
The gentlemen will compress their air and inflate their 
stocks, and at the same time squeeze the suckers. 



July 29. 1899. 




>AN IK • RSW8 LETTKR. 19 

LADIES GflN WEAR SHOErS 



WALL street is laughing and sympathizing as well as 
Wall street may with the gentlemen who went into 
Mr. Friek's combination for the purchase of old man 
Andrew Carnegie's iron and steel interests. If the N i:\v~ 
Letter'? readers will remember, they will recall the fact 
that the re-organized company paid the Scotch philan- 
thropist something like $100,000,000 in bonds, and that the 
buyers received stock. Carnegie, relieved from the cares 
of his vast business here, proclaimed it a sin for a man to 
die wealthy, declared that it was his intention to grow old 
gracefully, scatter his gold about his declining years in 
sweet-blooming charities, and finally, with the rattle of 
the last ducat, disappear from earth a poor man but a 
gem-decked soul. The friends of Sir Andrew are pointing 
to the way in which he got out of the iron business; and 
there is no secret on the street as to the opinion that he 
did up his partner in blow-hole steel and labor strikes to 
the extreme taste of her Royal Majesty the Queen. In 
selling his control Andrew received full value; he also will 
receive the earnings of the plant, which will be swallowed 
up in paying interest on the bonds held by the philan- 
thropic Carnegie. In the financial juggle the canny Scot 
has always been able to hold his own with a little to spare. 
His delightful proclamation of dispensing his wealth and 
dying poor provokes a smile from "the street," which sees 
in his latest financial triumph the sprouting of his celestial 

wings. 

* * * 

Your fellow townsman, Edwin Markham, be of the "Man 
with the Hoe," is attracting some attention here. The 
Manhattan Single Tax Club give him a dinner at the Marl- 
borough Hotel this evening, and Henry George's widow 
and son and John A. Parsons, the leader of the Brooklyn 
strike, will be prominent guests. It isevident that Mark- 
ham believes himself to be a man with a mission, and that 
the man with the hoe — otherwise the striker— and the 
germane elements, should have a more liberal supply of 

butter on their bread. 

* * * 

The performances of the Irish yacht Shamrock, tele- 
graphed from the ' other side, supplemented by private 
correspondence received here by yachtsman, are not cal- 
culated to fill the friends of Mr. Iselin's Columbia with joy. 
There is a very perceptible respect entertained for the 
foreigner, and it is no secret that her performances- are 
giving the defender of the cup on this side a good many 
thoughtful moments. Up to date her performances are 
altogether ominous by comparison with our own. It is 
admittedly hard to get a line on the two boats; but so far 
the Columbia has been clearly outfooted. If the weather 
should be good and the breeze stiff, the stranger will cer- 
tainly have the best of it. I regret to say that I imagine 
the Shamrock will carry away that insignificant though 
highly-prized cup next October. 

* * # 

John D. Rockefeller has just completed the purchase of 
twenty sections of forest lands in the Adirondack region. 
This, added to previous holdings, will give the great oil 
baron one hundred square miles in a single body in the 
Adirondacks. We are rapidly acquiring a landed aris- 
tocracy in this country. Rockefeller and his class are 
buying up immense tracts which should belong to the great 
State r